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Small Practice Marketing Strategies Twitter Chat (#KareoChat)

Posted on April 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Health IT Marketing and PR Awards 2016

Last week we held the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference which is organized by Healthcare Scene. By all accounts, the conference ran well and the feedback I’ve gotten is that people really enjoyed the event and the healthcare marketing and PR community we’ve built. During the event, we held the HITMC Awards and Kareo won the award for Best Social Media Program. This is a well deserved honor since they put a lot of work into hosting the weekly #KareoChat.

Coming out of the conference, Kareo asked me if there were some topics from the conference that would work well for the #KareoChat audience of small practice physicians. After reviewing the sessions at the conference, I realized that there was a lot of lessons from the conference that could be applied to small practice marketing. In fact, so many of the topics could be a #KareoChat of their own. With that said, they asked if I’d host this week’s #KareoChat based on topics from the conference. So, I decided to pull together a potpourri of topics that applied well to small practices.

Kareo Chat - HITMC

Here’s a look at the topics for this week’s #KareoChat:

  1. When and why should a physician practice go through a rebranding? #KareoChat @HealthITMKTG
  2. How can you use your and your competitors’ online reviews (good and bad) to your benefit? #KareoChat @mdeiner
  3. Could small practices benefit from their own podcast? Is it worth it?  #KareoChat @GetSocialHealth @Resultant @jaredpiano
  4. How and when should small practices use visual content in their office? #KareoChat @csvishal2222
  5. How can the 4 communication preferences (Facts, Futures, Form, Feelings) help small physician practice marketing? #KareoChat @ChartCapture
  6. Where and how can we use the power of storytelling in small physician practice marketing? #KareoChat @ctrappe @stacygoebel

If you’d like to join us to discuss these topics, just follow the #KareoChat hashtag on Thursday, April 14th at Noon ET (9 AM PT). I expect it will be a really diverse and interesting chat across a wide variety of topics related to small practice marketing.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is an advertiser on one of the Healthcare Scene websites.

#MGMA15 Tweetup and Hosting This Week’s #KareoChat

Posted on October 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The busy fall conference season is upon us and the fun begins. Honestly, I love traveling to all of these events (other than that part about leaving my family). I seriously feel lucky to take part in so many amazing healthcare IT and EHR related events. I know that some people see them as work, but they are all learning and fun for me. I guess I’m weird like that.

MGMA 2015
Next up on my calendar is MGMA this weekend. MGMA 2015 is in Nashville which is exciting for me since I’ve never been to Nashville. I hear that Nashville is chock full of great healthcare IT companies. My schedule is already jam packed with meetings. I’m also excited to see what practice managers are going to say about the current state of healthcare. I’ll be evaluating them for EHR PTSD (Although maybe it will all be ICD-10 PTSD).

If you’re going to be at #MGMA15 or live in Nashville, the good people at Stericycle have put together a tweetup on Monday, October 12th from 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM at the Fuse Sports Club inside the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Covention Center. You can find all the details for the tweetup and RSVP here. Everyone’s welcome to attend the tweetup whether they’re attending MGMA 2015 or not. I hope to see many of you there.

Hosting the #KareoChat
Kareo Chat Hosting by John Lynn
I’ll be once again hosting this week’s #KareoChat where we’ll be discussing Ways to Grow and Market Your Practice. The chat happens every Thursday at 9 AM PT (Noon ET). I hope you’ll be able to join us tomorrow. Here’s the 6 questions we’ll be discussing:

  1. What are the most effective ways to market your practice today?
  2. Which new opportunities are you watching that you believe will eventually help grow your practice?
  3. What tools or technologies do you use to help grow and market your practice?
  4. How do you engage your existing patients in your marketing efforts?
  5. What sources do you look to to stay up to date on the latest marketing practices?
  6. In what ways can small practices compete against large health system competitors when marketing their practices?

This topic is becoming more and more important to small practices who are trying to figure out how to survive. I hope you’ll all join me on the Twitter chat and share your insights into the topic.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is an advertiser on Healthcare Scene.

Are ACOs More About Good Accounting and Reporting Than Improving Care?

Posted on August 28, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently reading David Harlow’s analysis of the recently released data from CMS on ACO performance and found a lot to chew on. Most people have found the results underwhelming unless they’re big proponents of ACOs and value based reimbursement and then they’re trying to spin it as “early on” and “this is just the start.” I agree with both perspectives. Everyone is trying to figure out how to reimburse for value based care, and so far we haven’t really figured it out.

These programs aside, after reading David Harlow’s post, I asked the following question:

The thing I can’t figure out with ACOs is if they’re really changing the cost of healthcare or if they’re mostly a game of good accounting and reporting. Basically, do the measures they’re requiring really cause organizations to change how they care for patients or does it just change how organizations document and report what they’re doing?

I think this is a massive challenge with value based reimbursement. We require certain data to “prove” that there’s been a change in how organizations manage patients. However, I can imagine hundreds of scenarios where the organization just spends time managing how they collect the data as opposed to actually changing the way they care for patients in order to improve the data.

Certainly there’s value in organizations getting their heads around their performance data. So, I don’t want to say that collecting the right data won’t be helpful. However, the healthcare system as a whole isn’t going to benefit from lower costs if most ACOs are just about collecting data as opposed to making changes that influence the data in the right way. The problem is that the former is a program you can build. The later is much harder to build and track.

Plus, this doesn’t even take into account that we may be asking them to collect the wrong data. Do we really know which data we need to collect in order to lower the costs of healthcare and improve the health of patients? There is likely some low hanging fruit, but once we get past that low hanging fruit, then what?

In response to my comment, David Harlow brought up a great point about many of the ACO program successes not being reproducible. Why does an ACO in one area improve quality and reduce costs and in another it doesn’t?

All of this reminds me of the question that Steve Sisko posed in yesterday’s #KareoChat:

There are a lot of things that seem to make sense until you dig into what’s really happening. We still have a lot of digging left to do in healthcare. Although, like Steve, I’m optimistic that many of the things we’re doing with ACOs and value based care will provide benefits. How could they not?

The Power of Twitter Chats – Community

Posted on April 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been a fan of Twitter chats. There’s something great about a group of people coming together regularly to discuss a certain topic. The discussion can be really interesting and insightful. Many people will follow a Twitter chat and learn about a topic they are learning about, but not participate. However, the biggest value for me from participating in Twitter chats is the relationships that are built during the chat.

Mandi Bishop tweeted something at said at HIMSS15:

Considering it’s been retweeted and favorited like crazy, the message has really resonated on social media. Twitter chats are the perfect opportunity to interact with other humans. It’s the quintessential act of being human. Yes, that means that some people will fight over a topic, some people will have good behavior, some people will have bad behavior, some people will go off topic and start talking about hoping on a boat for a vacation, etc. While not all of these things are favorable, it gives a great glimpse into the humanity of a Twitter account. That bonds people in some of the same ways that bonding with someone in person can do.

What comes from all of these human connections is the growth of a community of people interested in a similar topic area. Notice that I said they were interested in a certain topic area and not necessarily that it was a monolithic group of people with the same interests. In fact, every Twitter chat I’ve been in has an amazingly diverse group of participants. No one really knows if you have 10 followers or 33,000 followers. They judge you on the content of your tweet and not your follower count in a Twitter chat.

I’ve seen this first hand as I’ve put together the #HITMC (Healthcare IT Marketing Community) chats. The community that’s come together around these chats has been phenomenal. I think we might have gone a little fast for the community hosting the chat every other week, but we’ll remedy that soon when we move to a monthly #HITMC chat. Regardless, it’s been a fantastic way to bring together the healthcare IT marketing and PR community. It’s become sort of a rallying space for people to share their ideas, learn from their colleagues, and meet new and interesting people. That’s powerful.

I’ve seen the same thing happen in participation in the #KareoChat and #InfoTalk Twitter chats. A community really comes together in a well hosted Twitter chat. One part education and one part meeting really smart people.

I’m not suggesting that Twitter chats are the solution to all your marketing challenges. In fact, in some places, it might not be the answer. However, I’m always amazed at the power of a great Twitter chat to bring together a community of people around an important topic.

Of course, if you don’t have the energy or reach to start your own Twitter chat, you can always piggy back other popular Twitter chats: #HITsm, #hcsm, or #hcldr to name a few.