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April Fool’s Day – Health IT Edition

Posted on April 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you know that I love a good April Fool’s day joke. I don’t like those that hurt people, but I love good humor (ask me about the time my wife said she was going into labor and wasn’t). You may remember my past years’ pranks about the #HIT100 Health IT Company, the ONC Reality TV show, and my personal favorite where we announced we’d be selling our own EHR software. Good memories all around.

This year I’ve been busy organizing the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy other people’s work. I’m sure I’ve missed some of the great health IT related April Fool’s day jokes, so let me know of others in the comments.

The big winner for April Fool’s 2016 for me was SnapChart from Twine Health. You’ll particularly enjoy it if you’re a SnapChat user, but it’s a great one either way. This video should demonstrate what I mean:

Well done Twine Health! I think even patient privacy advocates would appreciate SnapChart. “We all know that EHRs suck. Well this EHR only sucks for 7 seconds….BOOM”

Another honorable mention goes to Epic who has a long standing tradition of offering something entertaining on April Fool’s Day:
Epic April Fool's Day 2016
*Click on the image to see a larger version

Nice work by Epic to keep it topical with reference to Clinton and Sanders. However, the one that takes the cake is Jonathan Bush using MyChart. The only thing that would make me laugh more would be if athenahealth put out a video response from Jonathan Bush. Please?!

Cureatr decided to go old school with a new technology called the Faxenatr:

Howard Green, MD posted this announcement from Alphabet Inc and Google Inc’s company Verily Life Sciences about the UHIT (Universal Health Information Technology).

So many others I could mention outside of health IT. This one from Samsung about a 3D holographic projection was cool:


Although, when you look at what’s happening with VR, maybe it will be more reality than we realize.

Gmail’s Mic Drop is pretty funny. Well, at least it was until people starting losing their job because of it. The concept of a mic drop on email or social media is pretty interesting though. I wonder if there’s a way you could really implement something like it.

What other April Fool’s day jokes have you seen. It’s Friday. We all need a good laugh.

If You Can’t Beat Them, Fund Them!

Posted on September 2, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is CoFounder and CEO of Pristine, a VC backed company based in Austin, TX that builds software for Google Glass for healthcare, life sciences, and industrial environments. Pristine has over 30 healthcare customers. Kyle blogs regularly about business, entrepreneurship, technology, and healthcare at kylesamani.com.

In Where Does It Hurt, Athenahealth CEO Jonathan Bush explicitly calls out a number of businesses that are disrupting hospitals. Specifically, these businesses are performing a single function – e.g. labs, imaging, birthing, urgent care – at a much lower cost with higher quality than general-purpose hospitals. These modular businesses are disrupting hospitals by ruthlessly focusing all of their operations around a single service line to optimize quality and reduce costs. This stands in stark contrast to hospitals, which generally try to be all things to all people (the antithesis of entrepreneurship and general business practices).

I’ve previously outlined how healthcare providers are struggling as they shift to risk-bearing reimbursement models. They’re straddling two dramatically different business models as they try to transform their businesses from fee-for-service to risk-bearing. Inverting a business with thousands of employees and billions of dollars worth of assets and processes is nearly impossible. This is even more challenging in a highly uncertain and fast-changing regulatory environment.

But what if there was a better way?

In the Innovator’s Solution, author Clayton Christensen describes how multi-billion dollar companies such as Apple, IBM, Johnson and Johnson, and Intuit have disrupted themselves. When faced with disruptive changes in their respective businesses, these incumbents disrupted themselves by:

  • Funding a separate operating division with its own P&L
  • In physically removed location
  • With dedicated employees who have no responsibilities to the old business model.

This formula by no means guarantees success, but it creates an environment in which the disruptive division can potentially save the business as a whole, so long as the disrupting business has the operating freedom to disrupt the parent. Employees shouldn’t be bound to the processes, assets, and values of the old business model.

How can providers disrupt themselves?

How can providers, in particular large hospitals and health systems, adopt Christensen’s disruption framework? By funding their disruptors! This strategy drives value across a number of dimensions:

1) Hospital management will have the opportunity to learn about the operational expertise necessary to modularize their existing operations at a lower cost

2) Hospital management will have access to insider information about their own disruption that they would otherwise lack. They can in turn use this information to make smarter decisions about their own businesses, and potentially buy out the disruptees if they become too disruptive.

3) Drive inbound referrals from the periphery to the hubs

4) Generate a financial return

A practical example

My company, Pristine, recently spent some time learning about urgent care centers. We wanted to sell urgent care centers a lightweight telehealth platform so they could beam specialists and hospitalists into the urgent care center. This would allow the urgent care center to generate more revenue by avoiding “leakage” while also generating more revenue for the consulting specialist, guaranteeing more referral traffic to the host hospital, and providing the patient a more convenient experience. All parties would win. The idea was perfect in theory, except…

We discovered that non-hospital owned urgent care centers generally dislike hospitals, and are in fact too proud of the quality of care they provide to patients at much lower cost. These urgent care centers know that they’re disrupting hospitals, but are holding that against the hospitals as a reason not to align interests. Similarly, the hospitals view the urgent care centers as a competitive threat and have no desire to do business with them.

The more I think about this situation, the more I’m convinced that hospitals should invest in their disruptors. A financial tie will massage the hard feelings that exist and create an opportunity in which community resources can be most effectively coordinated across the continuum of care. As we move towards risk-based models, hospitals will need to drive patients to the most capitally efficient cost center that can diagnose and treat the patient.

What are your thoughts? Do you know of any major health systems investing in their disruptors? Or of any health systems that are outright trying to disrupt themselves by establishing modular service lines themselves? (Banner Health and University of Arizona are doing this to some extent!)

You Better Stay Healthy, or Else…

Posted on June 23, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is CoFounder and CEO of Pristine, a VC backed company based in Austin, TX that builds software for Google Glass for healthcare, life sciences, and industrial environments. Pristine has over 30 healthcare customers. Kyle blogs regularly about business, entrepreneurship, technology, and healthcare at kylesamani.com.

As I read Jonathan Bush’s new book, Where Does It Hurt? the most salient problem that Bush discusses is that hospitals can’t effectively measure or attribute their costs. As a result, they can’t make good decisions since they don’t know how to attribute costs and revenues.

Although this has been widely known for sometime, the implications of this are particularly interesting. Since hospitals don’t know how much it costs to actually deliver care (especially multi-faceted, complicated care), their various revenue streams are effectively subsidizing their expenses in an almost random manner. Accounting for costs and attributing revenue is nearly impossible.

Bush notes that more focused care centers – such as standalone labs, imaging centers, and minute clinics – can afford to offer many of the same services as hospitals with equal or greater quality at a lower cost. They can achieve this because they have dramatically less operational overhead than hospitals and have staff performing the same core basic functions repetitively. Indeed, practice makes perfect.

There are hundreds of companies all over the country building healthcare practices based on this very premise: labs, imaging, procedures, home health agencies, ASCs, birthing centers, cath labs, urgent care, retail clinics, and more. Focused-centers are slowly eating away at hospitals by providing better services at lower costs.

Today, hospitals make enormous profits by dramatically marking up routine procedures and services. But that won’t continue forever. As the ACA pushes patients towards high-deductible plans so that patients act more cost consciously, they will seek the more affordable alternatives. Patients will not agree to pay a $300 ER copay and $2000 MRI when the urgent care center down the street offers a $99 copay and $400 MRI. As patients make better decisions, hospitals will lose some of their easiest, most profitable revenues: extremely marked up lab tests, images, procedures, etc.

What will hospitals be left to do when their easiest, most profitable revenue vanishes? They will shift focus to what they do best: performing miracles. Hospitals will compete for high-end services such as-complex surgeries and intensive care. However, because routine services subsidize the hospital’s overhead, they currently offer surgeries and intensive care at a “discount.” When hospitals can no longer subsidize their complex care with routine care, hospitals will raise prices for the highest acuity services that can’t be performed elsewhere. If you thought acute sickcare was unaffordable, think again. The cost of complex care is going to grow dramatically in the coming years.

Open vs Closed EHR Systems with Jonathan Bush

Posted on June 7, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I had a video interview scheduled with Jonathan Bush from athenahealth. It was going to be broadcast live on my burgeoning EHR Videos website (Subscibe for EHR Video Email Updates) using the Google Plus Hangout technology. Everything was set until Google Plus HOA (Hangouts On Air as they’re called) wouldn’t load. It was a system wide problem and so we were unable to broadcast the interview. However, Jonathan and I were able to see each other and so we just did a more traditional interview about the subject of open vs closed EHR systems.

As you can imagine Jonathan had plenty to say on the subject of open versus closed EHR systems. We started the discussion discussing the business model of closed EHR systems and how looking at many EHR companies that seemed to be a very good business model. I asked him what was so bad about being closed.

Jonathan then told me that a closed EHR system is a great business model for the software vendor if you can get it. However, he said that as the product category matures the closed systems will get disrupted by more open options. In fact, at one point in our conversation he suggested that once some of the players become truly open, the other EHR vendors will have to follow along.

I was offered one caveat by Jonathan. He was curious if Epic was the exception to this rule. He wondered if Epic had so much money that they could last well beyond most companies. This cash could provide them the runway and opportunity to reinvent themselves along with those companies trying to disrupt them. Although, the most powerful comment made in regards to Epic was when he suggested that Epic has clients that benefit from Epic’s closed nature as well.

Another powerful comment he made was, “Affordable sounds like decline.” The concept is really interesting. Basically, so many EHR vendors have been able to charge an outrageous premium with amazing margins for their EHR software. If they were to choose to lower their price, many could misinterpret that decision as the company cutting prices to increase sales that have dropped off. Certainly the argument can be made that EHR vendors don’t need to charge what they do. However, image is important and could be influenced by a price drop.

While it’s always fun to talk about Epic with Jonathan, I also pressed him on why athenahealth wasn’t more open in the things they do. Couldn’t some of the same arguments made against closed EHR systems be applied just as easily to athenahealth? For example, why isn’t the athenahealth API more open?

In one of his more contemplative responses, Jonathan acknowledged that athenahealth was heading down the path of closed EHR systems. He saw that they were headed in a similar direction with their business model and so they had to decide if that’s the direction they wanted to continue or if they wanted to move towards a more open EHR model. He mentioned their More Disruption Please program and how the number of companies they were working with in that program was a sign of their move to be more open.

Jonathan admitted that the athenahealth API wasn’t where it should be, but that the goal was to have an API for every surface area of athenahealth. I wish we had this comment on video so we could really hold him to it. I love the idea of every surface area of an EHR being available through an API.

I also pressed Jonathan a little bit about CommonWell and whether it would be open to everyone and anyone that wanted to participate. He responded, “We expect every single maker of health information technology to obtain a key for every patient they have and see where that patient has been.” That was a pretty broad statement about openness. He did suggest that CommonWell was the right approach of knowing where the data was stored as opposed to storing every single person’s data in every clinic. It had to be a distributed patient records model.

Jonathan did also tell me that they’d recently got a call from Epic to work with them to build API connections with all the information in Epic. We’ll see if this is a step towards a more open Epic. Although, it still seems to follow the same pattern Judy discussed when she called Epic the most open EHR system she knew. She’s ok opening up with strategic partners.

I ended the conversation with me asking Jonathan what could be done to make the business model of being open work in healthcare. He mentioned two topics that deserve more time and their own dedicated post: a repriced athenaclinicals based on order and anti kick back laws as an obstacle for exchange of information. Both were preventing a market for health information. Our time ran out so I couldn’t dig into these subjects more. I’m going to see if Jonathan or someone from athenahealth would be willing to do a couple future guest blog posts on the subject.

As you can see, I covered a lot of ground with Jonathan in the 10 minutes we had. Imagine if we’d had the full 30 minutes. Plus, you could have heard it straight from him. I’m certain we’ll be inviting Jonathan back for another interview in our series of EHR Videos.

The TEDMED Experience

Posted on April 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those who follow Hospital EMR and EHR as well, you might have noticed my first post about The Healthcare Forum at TEDMED. That was a great starter event for my experience at TEDMED. A day and a half into TEDMED and I started to wonder if I could describe TEDMED in a couple words. I can’t, but I’m glad I was invited to attend the event as a guest of Xerox.

Instead of trying to describe the experience of TEDMED, I thought I’d offer some of the insights that the TEDMED speakers shared. Just realize that all of these speakers are surrounded by plenty of breathing room where you’re interacting with other TEDMED “delegates.” I’ve had conversations ranging from cancer treatments to genomics to EHR to public health and everything in between and around. In fact, you’re never quite sure who you might meet next and that’s what makes the experience unique.

As for the speakers – you’ll be able to see them all online eventually – but here are some key quotes, insights, comments, and assertions that were made by various speakers.

Anytime Jonathan Bush speaks is a highlight for me. The man does not know how to mince words and so you’re sure to get his raw, unadulterated feelings on a subject. You may disagree with him on some of the things he says, but he often opens your eyes to new areas of healthcare you hadn’t considered. In this case, Jonathan Bush was taking aim at many of the screwed up features of our healthcare system with healthcare costs clearly in focus.

Jonathan offered the following two insights on some of the current healthcare issues:
“The biggest problem is that our profit motive is trapped in a weak marketplace.”

“The tactics non-profit hospitals use would make John D Rockefeller blush.”

Of course, he also followed that up with a number of suggestions on what we need to do to improve healthcare:
“We need to let go of Precious. It will be OK. It’s a $2 trillion baby.”

“Entrepreneurs need to get out there and start delivering care, never mind corporate medical law..Get a lawyer and figure it out.”

“Why do the best doctors in the world only get to treat people in eastern Massachusetts?”

What might have been my favorite talk (and I think the only standing ovation at TEDMED so far) was Zubin Damania (better known as ZDoggMD). It’s not even fair to try and sum up Zubin’s TEDMED talk. I’m certain that once it’s out and available I’ll be embedding the whole video. However, I will highlight one really powerful point he made. When he became a doctor he realized he was “Doing something TO people, rather than something FOR people.” With Zubin’s move to Las Vegas and participation in the Downtown Project, he’s now excited to finally live the physician dream: “Do something FOR people, rather than TO people.”

Deborah Estrin made a really strong case for “packaging up your small data.” She said, “There’s a lot that I can learn about my personal health from my digital behavior.” For example, the app could create a comparative picture of your daily function this month relative to last month, by automatically analyzing motion, location, and vocabulary data plucked from your digital traces. I love the power of small data, but in this case it’s small data because it’s for an individual.

Gary Slutkin provided one of the most insightful TEDMED presentations at this point. He did an amazing job explaining violence as a disease. Even more powerful was how he then showed how violence can be treated similar to the way we treat diseases. The parallels were stunning and provided a unique insight to a challenging problem.

On the first night of TEDMED, the passionate America Bracho offered the following insight “Awareness increases in the presence of contradiction.” America made a number of other passionate comments about community health, but this comment really stood out to me. She highlighted how many of us ignore the plight of our communities so we don’t become aware of the contradictions around us. However, I think this concept applies in so many other areas of healthcare IT. We often turn a blind eye to a healthcare IT issue so we don’t have to recognize the contradiction. Awareness of issues is the first step to solving the contradictions.

One of the most powerful concepts I’ve heard was from Danny Hillis. He talked about the idea of disease preemption instead of disease prevention. Some might argue that disease preemption is just really early stage disease prevention. However, the concept of trying to preempt a disease that could be developing is incredibly powerful. I’ve talked about this from the perspective of treating healthy patients in the past. In this scenario, we could treat someone who appears healthy in order to preempt future health issues. This is a powerful concept that is also incredibly hard to deliver, but we could get closer to it with the right data and sensors.

Mike Pazin, director of ENCODE, called his genome work “fun.” We need more Mikes in healthcare having fun with the genome and we’ll quickly realize the benefits of genomics.

“What if obesity is a cover mechanism? What if diabetes resistance causes obesity as opposed to obesity causing diabetes resistance?” Peter Attia flipped the idea of obesity and diabetes on the head with this question.

Amy Abernethy and Elizabeth Marincola discussed the idea of healthcare information hoarding. Amy asked the important question, “What should healthcare information donation look like?” Elizabeth offered, “Science, Money, and the Public’s Right to Know are on a collision course.” and then “You can have your cake and eat it too. You can be profitable and still share the scientific research.” I’d have loved to hear more examples of how Elizabeth sees this vision happening, but I’m hopeful she’s right that, “The future of medicine is where every student and researcher can access any research done anywhere in the world.”

I know that’s a lot to chew on. Now sprinkle the above knowledge together with the entertainment – the raw dance motions of David Odde & Black Label Movement, the unique one man band of Kishi Bashi, the all star entertainer Richard Simmons, and many other fine artists – and you’ll have a small window into the TEDMED experience.

Read more coverage from TEDMED from Xerox on the Real Business at Xerox Blog and follow @XeroxHealthcare.

CommonWell Health Alliance – The Healthcare Interoperability Enabler?

Posted on March 4, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The biggest news that will likely come out of HIMSS was the big announcement that was made about the newly formed CommonWell Health Alliance. They’ve also rolled out a website for the new organization.

This was originally billed as a Cerner and McKesson announcement and would be a unique announcement from both the CEO of Cerner and McKesson. Of course, the news of what would be announced was leaked well before the press briefing, so we basically already knew that these two EHR companies were working on interoperability.

In what seemed like some final, last minute deals for some of the companies, 5 different software products were represented on stage at the press event announcement for CommonWell Health Alliance. The press event was quite entertaining as each of the various CEOs took some friendly jabs at each other.

Of course, Jonathan Bush stole the show (which is guaranteed to happen if he’s on stage). I think it was Neal Patterson who called Jonathan Bush the most articulate CEO in healthcare and possibly in any industry. Jonathan does definitely have a way with words.

One of Jonathan’s best quote was in response to a question of whether the CommonWell Health Alliance would just be open to any health IT software system, or whether it was just creating another closed garden. Jonathan replied that “even a vendor of epic proportions” would be welcome in the organization. Don Fluckinger from Search Health IT News, decided to ask directly if Judy from Epic had been asked about the alliance and what she said. They adeptly avoided answering the question specifically and instead said that they’d talked to a lot of EHR vendors and were happy to talk to any and all.

Although, this is still the core question that has yet to be answered by the CommonWell Health Alliance. Will it just be another closed garden (albeit with a few more vendors inside the closed garden)? From what I could gather from the press conference, their intent is to make it available to anyone and everyone. This would even include vendors that don’t do EHR. I think their intent is good.

What I’m not so sure about is whether they’ll put up artificial barriers to entry that stop an innovative startup company from participating. This is what was done with EHR certification when it was started. The price was so high that it made no sense for a small EHR vendor to participate. They could have certified as well, but the cost to become certified was so high that it created an artificial barrier to participation for many EHR vendors. Will similar barriers be put up in the CommonWell Health Alliance? Time will tell.

With this said, I think it is a step forward. The direction of working to share data is the right one. I hope the details don’t ruin the intent and direction they’re heading. Plus, the website even says they’re going to do a pretty lengthy pilot period to implement the interoperability. Let’s hope that pilot period doesn’t keep getting extended and extended.

Finally, I loved when Jonathan Bush explained that there were plenty of other points of competition that he was glad that creating a closed garden won’t be one of them. I hope that vision is really achieved. If so, then it will be a real healthcare interoperability enabler. Although, artificially shutting out innovative healthcare IT companies would make it a healthcare interoperability killer.

Do You Trust the Cloud for EHRs?

Posted on May 26, 2011 I Written By

A blog post today by Microsoft’s Dr. Bill Crounse got me thinking again about the cloud.

Crounse cited a new CDW poll showing that 30 percent of healthcare organizations could be considered “cloud adopters,” and for good reason. “The flexibility, scalability and lower costs associated with moving certain line of business applications to the cloud are compelling, especially for an industry like healthcare. After all, the primary focus of hospitals and clinics is caring for patients, not running an IT empire. There’s not a CIO, CFO, CEO, COO, CNO, CMIO, or CMO who wouldn’t love to shift some of their IT spending to delivering better care to the communities they serve,” Crounse wrote.

They were more likely to turn to the cloud for “commodity” services such as e-mail, file storage, videoconferencing and online learning. “Moving your ‘commodity’ applications to the cloud is an excellent place to start,” Crounse said. “I’d suggest first reaching out to your health industry peers and professional organizations to get a better sense of who’s doing what. I think when you’ve learned about some of the best health industry practices in cloud computing, you’ll be ready to explore what might be possible in your own organization.

But the fact that 30 percent of healthcare organizations use the cloud means that 70 percent do not. I suspect a lot of hospitals and physician practices still run aging, legacy client-server management systems in-house, just because that’s how people did things when those systems were first installed. As they replace their legacy technology, expect more healthcare organizations to opt for cloud services for these commodity-type services.

And what about clinical services?

At HIMSS11 back in February, Athenahealth honcho Jonathan Bush, a longtime fan of the cloud, told me he wanted to lead the “Cloud Cavalry” into Las Vegas (there’s no better place for an over-the-top spectacle, of course) next winter for HIMSS12. (See the second video for that.) Athenahealth, which has a certified, cloud-based EHR, straddles the line between clinical and administrative, and it’s not alone. I can’t think of a single ambulatory EHR vendor that doesn’t offer at least a cloud option if not a full-fledged SaaS product.

But is the cloud truly reliable for critical applications such as inpatient EHRs? In the wake of April’s Amazon EC2 cloud outage, I can imagine more than a few CIOs, practice managers and, especially, physicians are a bit skittish now.

What do you think?

“Tell Me Something I Don’t Know” with Jonathan Bush from AthenaHealth

Posted on April 26, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I got the request at HIMSS 11 to be able to sit down and talk with Jonathan Bush, CEO of AthenaHealth, I knew that I had to take it. Him and I had a very interesting conversation and he’s a fascinating individual since you never know what he might say next.

On that note, I decided that I better get Jonathan Bush on video at HIMSS. In fact, I think it might have been the only video I did at HIMSS. Although, once I saw how easy it was to upload this video from my phone, I might have to do more EMR related videos on the future. Although, I’ll probably need to hold it the other way.

Now to the video. The basic idea of “Tell Me Something I Don’t Know” comes from the Sunday show that Chris Matthew’s does. In the segment, the people try and tell you something you probably don’t know. I decided to do the same with Jonathan Bush using the various buzzwords at HIMSS: meaningful use, ACOs, incentive money, and healthcare reform.


Video of Jonathan Bush at HIMSS 11
Sorry the video quality and ambient noise isn’t the best. It was on a cell phone in a crowded exhibit hall.

Side Note: If you like videos, let me know. I’m thinking about doing more of them. Possibly some Q and A style videos. If you are interested, drop a question in the comments and I can use them for a future video.

Athena Health EHR Stimulus Guarantee Program

Posted on March 29, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m always amazed at the ability of businesses to innovate and find new ways to build their business. One of the impressive ones I’ve seen lately is Athena Health‘s EHR stimulus guarantee program. Yes, you might remember that I’ve written about the EMR stimulus guarantees before. Seems like most EMR vendors are providing some sort of guarantee or promise about the EMR stimulus money.

Of course, the Athena Health EHR stimulus guarantee is probably the strongest guarantee I’ve seen. Most other EHR stimulus guarantees still require that the end user fulfill their part of the bargain or else there is no guarantee. Makes sense right? How can an EMR vendor guarantee that you’re going to actually meaningfully use their EHR software? You are the one that’s going to have to show the meaningful use. The EHR vendor can only provide you the software to hopefully make that process easier (although, some probably don’t help this either).

However, Athena Health (from what I can tell) is actually guaranteeing that you’ll be able to get stimulus regardless of if it’s your fault or theres. I imagine they’ll still require that you go through the process, but there guarantee is the broadest of any I’ve seen covering even something that might be the doctors fault. How nice of them right?

Ok, let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves here. From what I can tell, Athena Health makes more of its money from the collections piece than they do from selling software. So, it makes sense why they’re willing to basically give you the software for free if you can’t get the EMR stimulus money. They probably don’t care (that much) about the revenue from selling software. They realize that the real cash cow in their business is the percentage they take from collections. Jonathan Bush never ceases to amaze me. I just wish I could have had a chance to interview him at HIMSS. Maybe next year.