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Will Windows 8 Kill Physician iPad EHR Requirement?

Posted on October 16, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday at the Digital Health Conference I had the chance to catch up with George Cuthbert from Medent. He’d emailed me a few months back about the potential benefit of Windows 8 in the EHR world and the deep integration of Win 8 that they’d been working on to leverage the unique abilities of Windows 8 for their EHR users.

I admit that since I’ve become more of a health IT blogger and less of a techguy, I haven’t kept close track of all that was happening with Windows 8. I knew that it was designed to incorporate touch as a major focal point of the new Operating System and I knew that it was Microsoft’s attempt to integrate the best of touch together with the advantages of data input using a keyboard and mouse.

Based on the short demo that George did for me of Win 8 and the Medent EHR, it has some real promise. In fact, as the title suggests, I think that if an EHR vendor does it right this could solve the issues that so many EHR vendors have of trying to create an iPad EHR application.

This may sound a little outlandish and certainly many doctors have a special love affair with Apple products. However, I think that most doctors don’t care if it’s an iPad or Windows 8. They just want the iPad like touch interface which allows them to smoothly consume data from their EHR. The Fujitsu model that George showed me has the potential to do just that. In fact, it was quite beautiful how seamlessly you could go from the tablet to a laptop workstation and back.

The biggest challenge that most EHR software will have with this idea is that their EHR isn’t built for touch. Just because Windows 8 makes touch possible doesn’t mean that it will be a good experience to use that way. That’s true for iPad as well and is the major reason why Citrix access to your EHR on your iPad isn’t a great solution. Touch requires a very different interface. George and Medent realize this and you could see the thought and effort they’ve been putting in to transform their interface into a touch optimized experience.

Obviously, I think we’ll still see plenty of iPad in healthcare and iPad EHR. However, I have a feeling that many in healthcare will be just as happy with the Windows 8 touch implementation.

The iPad Opportunity – A Decent EMR Interface

Posted on November 4, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday, I created a post on EMR & EHR called The Must Have EMR Feature – An iPad Interface. that post has driven quite a bit of discussion on Twitter and Google Plus. One comment from @2charlie hit me the most though:

2charlie – Charlie Gaddy
A decent web interface wouldn’t hurt either. RT @ehrandhit: The Must Have EMR Feature – An iPad Interface dlvr.it/tYkN7

Charlie’s twitter response highlights a number of interesting ideas. The first point that every SaaS EHR company will point out is that he said a web interface. We could go into the semantics of what is “the web”, but I have little doubt that Charlie meant a browser based interface when he said web. I’ll leave the rest of the discussion of “web” EMR interfaces for another post (plus, we’ve had that discussion many times on this site).

Instead, I want to focus on his use of the word “decent.” That adjective is interesting because no one would really argue that there aren’t plenty of web EMR interfaces out there. If you look at the EHR Scope EMR Comparison site, you’ll see a huge number of web based EMR companies listed. However, when you add the word “decent” to web EMR interface, I think we could have some really interesting discussion.

At least a couple times a week I get a doctor sending me an email or posting a comment on my website saying that “all of the EMR interfaces are terrible.” I don’t necessarily agree that “all” EMR interfaces are terrible, but a lot of them do fit the description quite well. I’m sure at this point all the EMR companies are thinking about their competitors and agreeing with me.

The iPad Opportunity for EMR Interfaces
As I thought on Charlie’s comment of a “decent web interface” as compared with an iPad EMR interface, I realized that the iPad provides a unique opportunity for EMR vendors with less than stellar web interfaces. While it would be great for EMR vendors to create stellar web interfaces or improve their current web interfaces, that’s much easier said than done. Many are working on older technologies. Others have so much company culture built into their interface that it’s hard to change. Many have large user bases that will freak out at the idea of a new web interface. Etc etc etc! The point being that the culture and history of many EMR interfaces make it hard to change.

In these cases, I see the iPad as a great opportunity to start fresh with your EMR interface. Many EHR vendors could use the iPad as a way to be able to create a new interface for their EMR with all the knowledge they’ve learned over the years baked in. Doctors expect the iPad interface to be different and unique.

I’ll be interested to see which EMR companies take this opportunity and make something of it. It’s the perfect chance for EMR companies to create a paradigm shift in their EMR software without having to admit publicly the mistakes they made in their first EMR interface. Unless you happen to be from an EHR company who built the perfect EMR interface from the start. Then, this need not apply.

The $9.99 iPad for Healthcare

Posted on September 8, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Many people in healthcare are still debating the value of the iPad in their medical practice. For example, Dr. West has expressed his iPad hesitations. That’s why I was fascinated when I saw this video which demonstrated a $9.99 iPad like tablet. This tablet even has some features the actual iPad has. Check out the video below to see what I mean:

I’m reminded of a previous post I did (which I can’t find right now) where I discuss the perfect solution to charting. It’s flexible, easy to learn, portable, etc….it’s a paper chart. Of course, don’t let the humor distract you from the benefits of an EMR or EHR.

Random Thoughts: EMR Projects Decentralized; Problems Persist Despite ‘Solutions’

Posted on August 4, 2011 I Written By

Once in a while, I run out of Big Ideas to share and resort to a rundown of short items. This is one of those times. Often, though, that approach turns out to be more interesting than a well-thought-out commentary. (Thus, the popularity of Twitter, right?)

Speaking of Big Ideas, I’m thinking that the age of the massive EMR project may be coming to an end. You may have seen my piece in InformationWeek today about the reported end of the national EMR in England. London’s The Independent reported earlier this week that the Cameron government will announce next month that it will scrap the national strategy in favor of allowing local hospitals and trusts to make independent EMR purchasing and implementation decisions.

This news comes on the heels of a decision by the government of Ontario to give up on hopes for a single EMR for all of Canada’s most populous province.

On the other hand, here in the States, we’ve seen a lot of consolidation among healthcare providers, but I’m guessing that has more to do with administrative Accountable Care Organizations and the prospect of bundled payments than any desire to build a more unified EMR. Though, consolidation does make health information exchange somewhat easier, and that’s going to be key to earning “meaningful use” dollars beyond 2013.

On a somewhat similar note, doesn’t a headline like, “Positive Outlook for Small Practice EHR Adoption” sound like a no-brainer? I mean, isn’t that the segment of healthcare providers that historically has had the slowest adoption rates? More than anyone else, small practices—particularly small, primary care practices—are the intended target of the federal EHR incentive program. And most of the news from health IT vendors of late has been about how they are going after this long-neglected market, right? The innovation seems to be happening in ambulatory EMRs, as evidenced by DrChrono’s newly certified iPad EHR app, aimed squarely at independent physicians.

That said, vendors and publicists, please do not start inundating me with news about other EHRs getting certified. There are hundreds of certified products out there now, and I cannot and will not write about, oh, about 95 percent of them.

While you’re at it, please stop using the word “solution” as a synonym for “product” or “service.” Tech journalists hate this trite, lazy and, frankly, inaccurate term so much that I’ve been instructed by the editors of InformationWeek not to use it, except in direct quotes. In fact, I get reminded not to use it pretty much every time I’m forwarded a press release laden with news about someone’s “solution.” Solution to what? I’ve been seeing that term since I started covering health IT more than a decade ago, and I still don’t see much getting solved in healthcare. With all the “solutions” out there, you’d think that healthcare had been fixed by now.

I could get a whole lot more curmudgeonly on you, but I think I’ll stop now and await your comments.

 

iPad EMR

Posted on April 8, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

EMR and EHR has been getting a ton of traffic related to my posts on the iPad EMR. It’s a really interesting discussion that I think people that love technology and EMR will enjoy. I have no doubt that the interface that the iPad is helping to promote and develop is going to have a major impact on healthcare. Not that everyone will have an iPad in healthcare, but that the technology behind it will be copied and we’ll see lots of interesting documentation methods for EMR software.

Dr. Larry Nathanson, MD from BIDMC seems to disagree with me in his writeup about his experience using the iPad in an Emergency Room. However, what I found most interesting about his writeup is his comments about the challenges of the iPad.

The first was how well it will hold up in a clinical environment. The iPad doesn’t seem to be the most rugged device and clinics like to abuse devices (from my experience). The second was the challenge that plagues all tablets: difficulty entering strong passwords. between the numbers, symbols and mixed case, it’s harder to enter these passwords on a device like the iPad. Is biometrics the solution to that?

What do you all think about the iPad and EMR? Will we see an iPad only EMR develop into a real power player in the industry?