Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

HIEs and Patient Engagement – Why and Why Now?

Posted on June 20, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest post by Jeff Donnell, President of NoMoreClipboard.
Jeff Donnell - NoMoreClipboard PHR
Health information exchanges have become quite adept at moving medical data from provider to provider on behalf of patients, but making that data available to those same patients has rarely been attempted – until recently.

Not including patients at the HIE exchange table is understandable, but ironic. Understandable for reasons ranging from policy challenges to a lack of standards to technical limitations. Ironic because HIEs are ideally positioned to aggregate data from multiple providers – leveraging the interfaces already in place with provider applications – and deliver that data to consumers, overcoming several of the major barriers to patient adoption and use of tools like PHRs and patient portals.

HIEs have recently grown interested in supporting electronic patient engagement, in large part based on provider inquiries regarding meaningful use stage two requirements. Many providers are looking for affordable alternatives to the tethered patient portals being offered by their EHR vendors, and they want to provide their patients with a solution that can be used across the care continuum. Increasingly, providers recognize that a patient who visits five different clinicians is not about to create five different patient portal accounts. Savvy providers realize that the HIE is well equipped to provide portable, interoperable solutions.

For HIEs interested in long-term sustainability, patient engagement makes perfect sense. The HIE can leverage its existing interfaces and aggregated data – making existing medical information available to patients from a single pipe, in a standardized format. The HIE can act as a conduit between consumers and clinicians – adding value for all parties. Providers can transmit data to patients, and recent CMS guidance indicates that all providers who contribute data to a shared portal (like that provided by an HIE) can count patients who use that portal toward their 5% patient participation requirement. Patients avoid having to collect data from every provider they see, and can populate a PHR or HIE portal account with existing electronic data. Everybody wins.

The value is evident, but what about those challenges? In the state of Indiana, we received an ONC Challenge Grant to figure out how to get HIE data in the hands of consumers with a PHR. We are fortunate to reside in a state with five well-established HIEs and a provider community eager to innovate, and we have spent the last two years working on those challenges (giving us a real appreciation for why the ONC affixed the challenge label to this grant program). We have addressed issues ranging from patient ID/Auth/Match to minor consent to provider skepticism to amended data use agreements. We have overcome any number of obstacles to get data flowing, and we are seeing increased levels of engagement and enhanced clinical outcomes.

We have learned any number of lessons to help other HIEs, state agencies and healthcare providers avoid pitfalls and make accelerated progress. We are eager to share what we have learned. Perhaps the most important lesson is to get started now – as crafting and implementing a patient engagement strategy takes time. As nobody appears to be manufacturing more time these days, HIEs and other organizations that envision sharing data with patients even a year or two down the road would be well advised to begin working in earnest, with an eye on making incremental progress.

Jeff Donnell is president of NoMoreClipboard, a web-based, Personal Health Record (PHR) management system designed to consolidate medical information in one convenient and secure location for easy retrieval and updates. NMC enables consumers to share personal or family member medical information with medical professionals electronically, reducing the need for repetitive medical paperwork.  Jeff and the company are committed to developing PHR applications that are consumer-friendly, interactive, secure, mobile and interoperable.  For more information, follow us on Twitter @NoMoreClipboard or visit www.NoMoreClipboard.com.

Private HIE’s Will Make Nationwide HIE Possible

Posted on June 14, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve been working for a long time on creating a nationwide HIE. I still remember when I first started blogging about EMR 7.5 years ago we were talking about implementing RHIO’s. I’m sure someone reading this blog can talk about what the exchange of health data was before RHIO’s. The irony is that we keep talking about creating this beautiful exchange of information, but it never really becomes a reality.

As I look at the landscape, there are very few HIEs that are showing a viable business model. The two leaders I think are probably the Indiana HIE and the Maine HIE. They seem to be the two making the most progress. I think there’s also something going on in Massachusetts, but it’s so complicated of a healthcare environment that I’m not sure how much is reality and hyperbole.

With those exceptions, I’m mostly seeing a lot of talk about some sort of community HIE and not very much action. However, I am seeing quite a few organizations starting to take the idea of a private HIE quite seriously. I’m not sure if this is driven by ACOs, by hospital consolidation, or some other force, but the move to implement a private HIE is happening in many health systems.

For a lot of reasons this makes sense. There is a business reason to create a private HIE and you own all the endpoints, so it’s easier to create consensus.

As I look across the landscape, I think these private HIEs could be what makes the nationwide HIE possible. Once a whole series of large private HIEs are in place, then it’s much easier to just connect the private HIEs than it is to try and connect each of the individual healthcare organizations.

Watch for the major hospital CIOs to meet at events like CHIME or HIMSS and discuss connecting their private HIEs. It will create some unlikely relationships, but it could be our greatest hope for a nationwide HIE.

HIE Waste

Posted on October 30, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a post on LinkedIn, David Angove offered this comment on government HIE funding:

The biggest waste of the new program I’ve seen is the HIE (Health Information Exchange) part. It got much more money than the EHR/MU part (5-10 times) and much of it ended up in the pockets of universities who just absorbed it as personal funding. Just look to see how many HIEs are actually functional in the US now almost 4 years after the grants were awarded. Most of the working HIEs were done by private groups who got tired of waiting for the groups who got all the grant money to do something.

It should be clear that David’s comparing the money spent on HIE’s as compared with RECs (he refers to it as EHR/MU). If you take in the larger EHR incentive money that doctors will receive, then it blows the HIE portion of the funding away.

Instead of focusing on the comparable amounts, I think the question of whether the HIE money the government put out as part of ARRA and the HITECH Act has been generally a waste. I started to think through the successful HIE projects out there. David’s right that the most successful ones I know of (see Indiana’s HIE, Maine’s HIE, and Arizona’s HIE) would have happened regardless of whether the government money came. Does anyone know of government funded HIEs that are seeing success and wouldn’t have without the government money?

The hard part of this question is that we’re not likely to know exactly how well the HIE funding has gone until we see how many HIEs survive post government funding.

Related to this was how many hospital CIOs I’ve talked to that don’t believe that HIE is the future of health information exchange. As one hospital CIO told me, he didn’t think that the HIE was a viable model. Instead he suggested that point to point exchange of information is going to be the winner when it comes to exchanging health information. Considering the issues related to HIE, I have a hard time arguing against that thought.