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Power of the Cloud EHR – Hidden Technology

Posted on August 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s post will be short. I’m hitting up the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas today and tomorrow. For those not familiar with Black Hat, it’s a hackers conference. It’s not quite as hardcore as Defcon when it comes to hacking, but they warn you about getting your devices hacked. I personally plan to play it safe and not bring my laptop and to turn my cell phone off. Anyway, hopefully I’ll do some future posts on security based on what I learn at the event. I always find deep value in going to a conference that doesn’t apply specifically to what I’m doing. Although, in the past they’ve had some medical device hacking sessions, but I digress.

The title of this post describes a concept I was recently considering. In fact, it was inspired by a comment on a previous post by Suzanne McEachron, that talked about a clinic needing to upgrade their in house EHR server from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008. Here’s the full comment:

Your statement, “While it’s sometimes disappointing to look at the old technology that powers healthcare,” must refer to an ambulatory vendor I am aware of, which installed its software onto a Windows Server 2003 just 3 years ago, and is now demanding the provider upgrade to Windows Server 2008. The provider wants to upgrade to Windows Server 2012, but the software company’s software won’t reliably work (yet) on that version. What is a poor country doctor to do?
He will be dumping his current vendor and finding a software company which uses the cloud instead of servers in his office.
Companies which continue to not keep up, will be left with few customers.

The last two lines are probably worthy of their own post. So, we’ll mostly set them aside for now. However, I was struck by Suzanne’s comment that they would be going with a cloud solution after this experience with an in house EHR vendor.

I’d never thought of this before I read this comment, but is one of the benefits of a cloud EHR that the user has no idea what type of back end technology you’re using to deliver the software? Sure, some of them will ask some questions during the EHR selection process, but I’ve never seen anyone ask a cloud EHR vendor how they’re doing at keeping their technology stack up to date. The reality for end users is that they don’t really care what technology is being used. They only care about the end result. Does it work? Yes. Is it fast enough? Yes. Then, since it’s in the cloud, who cares what technology is being used?

Of course, this may be exaggerating the situation a little, but not much. Certainly very few if any people are asking cloud providers how they’re doing at keeping their technology up to date. No doubt some do care about this and run into this problem even with cloud providers. My favorite example of this is when a cloud EHR provider requires a clinic to use an extremely outdated version of IE (internet explorer) to run the EHR. Yes, then they start to care a lot more.

Maybe it’s a mistake that practices don’t keep after their cloud provider more. However, the reality today is that the don’t. That makes it a huge advantage for cloud EHR providers. At least it does until they’re so outdated that they can’t hide it anymore. For example, when they can’t launch an iPad app because there’s no way for their old technology to work with it. Sounds like I need to create a new jokes series called, “Your EHR might be outdated if….” The problem is the jokes won’t be too funny if you’re suffering through it.

Side Note: So much for it being a short post.

The Move to Cloud EHR

Posted on August 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m pretty sure that many people missed the announcement that Amazing Charts now offers a Cloud EHR. For those who don’t eat, sleep and breathe EHR like me, you probably don’t realize that this is a pretty significant announcement on Amazing Charts part and I think represents a larger shift in the EHR industry.

I know the SaaS EHR purists will say that not all “Cloud EHR” are created equal. This is highlighted in the Amazing Charts press release where it says “without a web browser.” It’s an ironic statement when you consider that most SaaS EHR happily say, “with only a web browser.” (Although, the web browser only EHR software companies should read this post by Dr. West) However, my goal here isn’t to highlight the various nuances of hosted or cloud EHR software.

Instead, I wish to highlight how one of the popular, established, client server EHR software vendors was getting enough requests from doctors for a hosted EHR solution that they now offer a cloud based EHR. The reality is that many physician practices want to have to deal with as little IT support as possible. This is the major reason I’ve heard over and over again that many practices want to have a hosted EHR.

It’s worth pointing out that Amazing Charts focuses on the small physician practice market. It’s always been clear that the larger physician practices or hospital owned practices have better capabilities and a greater interest in hosting their EHR in house. While there are strengths and weaknesses to a hosted EHR vs an in house EHR, the hosted EHR is the compelling choice for the IT averse clinic.

Very soon we’re going to see almost all new EHR installs in small ambulatory practices using some sort of hosted EHR software. This doesn’t necessarily spell the death of client server EHR software. Many large practices will continue using and implementing client server EHR software. Not to mention many long time EHR users will continue with their existing client server installs. However, the shift to hosted EHR is happening and will start to really pick up pace in the next couple years.

Full Disclosure: Amazing Charts is an advertiser on this site, but they didn’t know I was doing this post.

Cloud Computing Won’t Be the Death of Client Server EMR – Something Else Will Be

Posted on May 9, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the all time favorite topics of discussion here at EMR and HIPAA is around SaaS EHR software versus client server EHR software. They each go by many other names and the technical among us might know the hard core technical difference between each, but most doctors don’t know and don’t care. SaaS EHR software is often called hosted EHR software or ASP EHR software or even Cloud Computing if you want to use a general term. Client Server EHR software is sometimes called in house EHR software or self hosted EHR software. I’m sure there are other names I missed.

Regardless of what you call it, many people (usually those from SaaS software vendors) believe that client server software will lose out to the cloud. It’s hard to argue with them since in almost every other industry cloud based software has won.

Here’s why I don’t think we’re going to spell the death of client server software for a long time to come. Client server is going to be here for a long time because of such wide adoption by so many doctors. Not to mention, many of the client server EHR systems are really large implementations that would be hard to displace. Plus, there are many doctors who don’t care about the mobile benefits of a SaaS based EHR software. Quite a few doctors want to only use their EHR software in their office.

Certainly there are others on a client server based EHR system which will want to access their EHR outside of their office. Unfortunately, instead of EHR replacement we’re likely to see a hybrid environment that supports client server and some sort of app environment come out of the various client server EHR vendors.

Sure, a lot of doctors will also use Citrix or other remote desktop environments and hate the user experience, but it will pacify them until the hybrid EHR environment is built. In fact, that hate towards the remote desktop environment on a mobile device will drive the development of this hybrid approach. The advantages of a client server environment with an app connection will keep the client server environment around for a while.

So, while many want to declare the death to client server, I’m not ready to do so. Sure, SaaS EHR software has its advantages, but client server software isn’t going to go down without a fight and they’re going to be around for a while since in many cases they hold the high ground.