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Healthcare Data Breach Deja Vu…More Like Groundhog Day

Posted on January 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I was intrigued by Ryan Witt’s comment about it being Deja Vu when it came to more healthcare data breaches. In many ways he’s right. Although, I’d almost compare it more to the movie Groundhog Day than deja vu. If it feels like we’ve been through this before it’s because we have been through it before. The iHealthBeat article he links to outlines a wide variety of healthcare breaches and the pace at which breaches are occurring is accelerating.

I think we know the standard script for when a breach occurs:

  1. Company discovers a breach has occurred (or often someone else discovers it and lets them know)
  2. Company announces that a “very highly sophisticated” breach occurred to their system. (Note: It’s never admitted that they did a poor job protecting their systems. It was always a sophisticated attack)
  3. Details of the breach are outlined along with a notice that all of their other systems are secure (How they know this 2nd part is another question)
  4. They announce that there was no evidence that the data was used inappropriately (As if they really know what happens with the data after it’s breached)
  5. All parties that were impacted by the breach will be notified (Keeping the US postal service in business)
  6. Credit monitoring is offered to all individuals affected by the breach (Makes you want to be a credit monitoring company doesn’t it?)
  7. Everything possible is being done to ensure that a breach like this never happens again (They might need to look up the term “everything” in Webster’s dictionary)

It’s a pretty simple 7 step process, no? Have we seen this before? Absolutely! Will we see it again? Far too much.

Of course, the above just covers the public facing component of a breach. The experience is much more brutal if you’re an organization that experiences a breach of your data. What do they say? An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. That’s never more appropriate than in healthcare security and privacy. Unfortunately, far too many are living in an “ignorance is bliss” state right now. What they don’t tell you is that ignorance is not bliss if you get caught in your ignorance.

EMR Divide Remains Between Larger And Smaller Practices

Posted on January 31, 2014 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study finds that while physicians’ adoption of EMRs has grown substantially between 2009 and 2012, there’s still a big “digital divide” between large and small medical practices, according to a Commonwealth Fund study reported by iHealthBeat.  But it also concluded that there are ways to close the gap, largely through cash incentives and tech help.

According to the study, EMR adoption by primary care physicians increased from 46 percent in 2009 to 69 percent in 2000.  What’s more, Commonwealth Fund found that most doctors are using core health IT functions, including clinical decision support, e-prescribing and electronic ordering of lab tests.  This is clearly a sign that Meaningful Use Stage 1 has had a large impact. (We’re still waiting to see whether doctors continue to drop out and avoid Stage 2’s tougher criteria.)

The study also found that as of 2012, 33 percent of doctors could electronically exchange clinical summaries, and 35 percent could share lab or diagnostic tests with physicians outside their practices electronically.

But these results were not distributed evenly.  Specifically, researchers found that practice size substantially affected EMR adoption.

For example, the research found that 90 percent practices with 20 or more doctors had adopted EMRs, but that just 50 percent of solo physician practices were on board. That being said, the study found higher rates of EMR adoption among small practices that were sharing resources or that took advantage of Meaningful Use incentives.

All told, researchers concluded that technical assistance programs that incentives close the digital divide regarding EMRs between large and small practices.  This just makes sense. If such programs can make it easy and even lucrative to adopt EMRs, we could see the digital gap close soon.

Parents Using PHRs More Likely To Get In All Well-Child Visits

Posted on October 18, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Parents using an integrated PHR were more likely to take their young children to all recommended well-child visits, according to a Kaiser Permanente study reported in iHealthBeat.

More than 4.3 million members are registered to use Kaiser’s PHR, My Health Manager, on kp.org. During the first half of this year, patients have viewed 17.5 million lab test results, sent 7.4 million secure e-mails to their care providers, refilled 7.1 million prescriptions and scheduled 1.8 million appointments, reports News-Medical.

The study, which was published in The Journal of Pediatrics, analyzed data on more than 7,000 children ages zero to two living in the Northwest U.S. and Hawaii.  The children were enrolled in KP health plans between January 2007 and July 2011.  To determine the appropriate number of well-child visits, researchers  used performance measures listed in the 2010 Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set that state that children aged 0 to 15 months should attend at least six well-care visits, News-Medical says.

The study found that in the Northwest region, children whose parents used the Kaiser PHR during the study period were 2.5 times more likely to bring their child to the recommended number of well-child visits. These children were also 1.2 times more likely to get all of their immunizations.

In Hawaii, meanwhile, children in this group were two times more likely to get all well-child visits, but results related to immunizations were statistically insignficant, iHealthBeat notes.

While it may be too soon to call it a trend, this is one of a growing number of projects which use the PHR concept to help patients engage and take responsibility for their health behaviors.

For example, this summer Howard University Hospital rolled out a mobile PHR for pre-diabetic young adults designed to help them take control of their health.  Howard has given the young adults in the program — aged 18 to 24 and diagnosed with pre-diabetes — access to a mobile version of the NoMoreClipboard PHR for their smartphones.

The program sends a variety of text messages to the young adults targeted by this intervention, which include reminders to interact with the PHR. The program participants are also given a FitBit Zip wireless activity tracker which keeps track of steps taken, distance covered and calories burned per user.

Projects like these, which help patients make the PHR the fulcrum point for better health, are a smart way of using the technology. I expect to see a great deal more of this “PHR=patient engagement=better health” model going forward.