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Top 4 HIT Challenges and Opportunities for Healthcare Organizations in 2015 – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on January 15, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Mitchell Woll, Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Mitchell Woll - The Breakaway Group
Healthcare organizations face numerous challenges in 2015: ICD-10 implementation, HIPAA compliance, new Meaningful Use objectives, and the Office of the National Coordinator’s (ONC) interoperability road map.  To adapt successfully, organizations must take advantage of numerous opportunities to prepare.

Healthcare leaders must thoroughly assess, prioritize, prepare, and execute in each area:

  1. Meaningful Use Stage 2 objectives require increased patient engagement and reporting for a full year before earning incentives.
  2. The ONC’s interoperability road map demands a new framework to achieve successful information flow between healthcare systems over the next ten years.
  3. There are 10 months left in which to prepare for the October 1 ICD-10 deadline.
  4. HIPAA compliance will be audited.

1. Meaningful Use
For those who have already implemented an EHR, Meaningful Use Stage 2 focuses new efforts on patient access to personal health data and emphasizes the exchange of health information between patient and providers. Stage 2 also imposes financial penalties for failure to meet requirements.

CMS’s latest deadline for Stage 2 extends through 2016, so healthcare organizations have additional time to fulfill Stage 2 requirements. Stage 3 requirements begin in 2017, so healthcare organizations should take the extra time to build interoperability and foster an internal culture of collaboration between providers and patients. For Stage 3, Medicare incentives will not apply in 2017 and EHR penalties will rise to 3 percent.

CMS has also proposed a 2015 EHR certification, which requests interoperability enhancement to support transitions of care.  Complying with this certification is voluntary, but provides the opportunity to become certified for Medicare and Medicaid EHR incentive programs at the same time.

Meaningful Use Stage 2 and the ONC roadmap require that 2015 efforts concentrate on interoperability. Healthcare organizations should prepare for health information exchange by focusing efforts on building patient portals and integrating communications by automating phone, text, and e-mail messages. After setting up successful exchange methods, healthcare organizations should train staff how to use patient portals. The delay in Stage 2 means providers have more time to become comfortable using the technology to correspond with patients. Hospitals should also educate patients about these resources, describing the benefits of collaboration between providers and patients. Positive collaboration and successful data exchange helps achieve desired health outcomes faster.

2. Interoperability
The three-year goal of the ONC’s 10-year roadmap is for providers and patients to be able to send, receive, find, and use basic health information. The six and ten-year goals then build on the initial objectives, improving interoperability into the future.

Congress has also shown initiative on promoting interoperability asking the ONC to investigate information blocking by EHRs. Most of the ONC’s roadmap for the next three years is similar to Meaningful Use Stage 2 goals.

Sixty-four percent of Americans do not use patient portals, so for 2015 healthcare organizations should focus on creating them, refining their workflows, and encouraging patients to use them. Additionally, 35 percent of patients said they are unaware of patient portals, while 31 percent said their physician has never mentioned them. Fifty-six percent of patients ages 55-64, and 46 percent of patients 65 and older, said they would access medical information more if it were available online. Hospitals need their own staff to use and promote patient portals in order to conquer the challenges of interoperability and Stage 2.

3. HIPAA Compliance
In 2015, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) will audit EHR use, looking closely at HIPAA security, incentive payments, possible fraud, and contingency plan requirements. Also during the HIPAA compliance audit, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) will confirm whether hospitals’ policies and procedures meet updated security criteria.  Healthcare organizations should take this opportunity to verify compliance with 2013 HIPAA standards to prepare for upcoming audits. Many helpful resources exist, including HIPAA compliance toolkits, available from several publishers. These kits include advice on privacy and security models. Healthcare organizations and leaders can also take advantage of online education, or hire consultants to help review and implement the necessary measures. It’s important that action be taken now to educate staff about personal health information security and how to remain HIPAA compliant.

4. ICD-10 Deadline
The new ICD-10 deadline comes as no surprise now that it was delayed several times. In July 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) implemented the most recent delay and set a new date of Oct. 1, 2015, giving hospitals a 10-month window to prepare for the eventual ICD-10 rollout. Because healthcare organizations are more adaptable than ever, they can use their practiced flexibility and experience to meet these demands successfully.

As Health Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) suggests, communication, education and testing must be part of an ICD-10 implementation plan. Informing internal staff and external partners of the transition is a crucial first step. ICD-10 should be tested internally and externally to verify the system works with the new codes before the transition. Healthcare organizations should outline and develop an ICD-10 training program by selecting a training team and assessing the populations who need ICD-10 education. They should perform a gap analysis to understand the training needed and utilize role-based training to educate the proper populations. Finally, organizations should establish the training delivery method, whether online, in the classroom, one-on-one, or some combination of these to teach different topics or levels of proficiency. In my experience at The Breakaway Group, I’ve seen that the most effective and efficient education is role-based, readily-accessible, and offers learners hands-on experience performing tasks essential to their role. This type of targeted education ensures learners are proficient before the implementation. As with any go-live event, healthcare organizations must prepare and deliver the new environment, providing support throughout the event and beyond.

Facing 2015
These challenges require the same preparation, willingness, and audacity needed for prior HIT successes, including EHR implementation and meeting Meaningful Use Stage 1 requirements. ICD-10, HIPAA compliance, Stage 2, and interoperability all have the element of education in common. Healthcare organizations and leaders should apply the same tenacity and discipline to inform, educate, and prepare clinicians for upcoming obligations.

Targeted role-based education will best ensure proficiency and avoid comprehensive, costly, and time-consuming system training. Through role-based education, healthcare organizations gain more knowledgeable personnel who are up to speed on new applications. These organizations probably already have at least a foundation for 2015 expectations, and they should continue to recall the strategies used for prior go-live events. What was successful? It’s important to plan to replicate successful strategies, alleviating processes that caused problems.  This is great opportunity to capitalize efforts for organizational improvements. Healthcare leaders must let the necessity of 2015 government requirements inspire invention and innovation, ultimately strengthening their organizations.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

ICD-10 Flight Delayed, But Keep Your Bags Packed – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer_web

If you’ve ever traveled to a country that doesn’t speak your native tongue, you can appreciate the importance of basic communication. If you learn a second language to the degree that you’re adding nuance and colloquialisms, you’ve experienced how much easier it is to explain a point or to get answers you need. What if you’re expected to actually move to that foreign country under a strict timeline? The pressure is on to get up to speed. The same can be said for learning the detailed coding language of ICD-10.

The healthcare industry has been preparing in earnest to move from ICD-9 coding to the latest version of the international classification of diseases. People have been training, testing and updating information systems, essentially packing their bags to comply with the federal mandate to implement ICD-10 this October — but the trip was postponed. On April 1, President Barrack Obama signed into law a bill that includes an extension for converting to ICD-10 until at least Oct. 1, 2015. What does this mean for your ICD-10 travel plans?

Despite the unexpected delay, you’ll be living in ICD-10 country before you know it. With at least another year until the deadline, the timing is just right to start packing and hitting the books to learn the new codes and to prepare your systems. For those who have a head start, your time and focus has not gone to waste, so don’t throw your suitcases back into the closet. The planning, education and money involved in preparation for the ICD-10 transition doesn’t dissolve with the delay – you’ve collected valuable tools that will be put to use.

Although many people, including myself, are disappointed in the change, we need to continue making progress toward the conversion; learning and using ICD-10 will enable the United States to have more accurate, current and appropriate medical conversations with the rest of the world. Considering that it is almost four decades old, there is only so much communication that ICD-9 can handle; some categories are actually full as the number of new diagnoses continues to grow. ICD-9 uses three to five numeric characters for diagnosis coding, while ICD-10 uses three to seven alphanumeric characters. ICD-10 classifications will provide more specific information about medical conditions and procedures, allowing more depth and accuracy to conversations about a patient’s diagnosis and care.

Making the jump to ICD-10 fluency will be beneficial, albeit challenging. In order to study, understand and use ICD-10, healthcare organizations need to establish a learning system for their teams. The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, provides training for caregivers and coders that eases learning challenges, such as the expanded clinical documentation and new code set for ICD-10. Simply put, there are people can help with your entire ICD-10 travel itinerary, from creating a checklist of needs to planning a successful route.

ICD-10 is the international standard, so the journey from ICD-9 codes to ICD-10 codes will happen. Do not throw away your ICD-10 coding manuals and education materials just yet. All of these items will come in handy to reach the final destination: ICD-10.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

4Med Health IT Courses – HIPAA Training, ICD-10 Training, PQRS Training and More

Posted on January 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ve been sharing a number of different 4Med approved education courses on this site and throughout my various social media channels. I think 4Med’s done a pretty good job putting together training courses that matter to those of us in Healthcare IT. For example, they have HIPAA courses, EHR Courses, ICD-10 courses and they recently added a course on PQRS which I haven’t seen anywhere else. As a partner, those links and the discount code “healthcare20” will get you a 20% discount off the course price. Plus, many of the courses include CMEs for those that need them.

What’s also been amazing to me is how many people I work with sell the 4Med courses as well. Everyone from health IT service providers to EHR consulting companies are signed up as 4Med affiliates and are suggesting these courses to their clients.

It makes sense why so many people are interested in these training courses. HIPAA Omnibus has led many to take another look at their HIPAA compliance. One of those requirements is to have regular HIPAA training. ICD-10 is bearing down on us and many aren’t ready and so ICD-10 training is going to be huge over the next 6 months. PQRS penalties are coming and many have no idea how the PQRS program even works. Hopefully these training courses can be useful for many of you.

Outfitting for the ICD-10 Voyage – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on November 19, 2013 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Laura Speek from The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company) and Honora Roberts from Xerox. Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
ICD-10 Boat
These are challenging times for healthcare providers in every imaginable vessel – and the whitewater ride is not over yet. Just around the bend looms the transition to ICD-10, scheduled for October 1, 2014. Most providers know the wisest course is to start preparing now, yet few have dared to navigate these uncharted waters.

For many, a major problem is not knowing where to start. Others may be suffering from protracted procrastination. And still others may be well on the road to ruin via the path of good intentions.

An effective way to put some wind in your ICD-10 sails is to get real about the serious costs of noncompliance. After October 1, 2014, claims must be submitted using ICD-10 coding to be eligible for reimbursement. In other words, if you don’t bill with ICD-10 codes, you simply won’t get paid. And that’s the cold, hard truth.

The transition to ICD-10 will affect every facet of healthcare, but it begins with understanding the basic differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10. First and foremost, ICD-10 is not just a simple expansion of ICD-9. There is no reliable one-to-one mapping system. Some ICD-9 codes equate to multiple ICD-10 codes, while some do not correspond to any.

ICD-10 codes include much greater specificity; care providers must document etiology, laterality, exact anatomical site, and other information. Patient encounter documentation must include proper detail to enable coders to locate the correct ICD-10 diagnosis and procedure codes. Physicians and mid-level providers should begin to assess their documentation today to identify where ICD-10 coding requirements are already being met and where improvement is needed.

Because clinical documentation is at the core of every patient encounter, it must be complete, precise, and accurately reflect the scope of care and services provided. Assuring depth and consistency of documentation represents a challenge for many organizations.

ICD-10 encompasses a huge increase in accessible codes. The ICD-10-CM diagnostic code set, used in all healthcare settings, increases from roughly 13,000 to 68,000 codes. The ICD-10-PCS procedural code set, used within inpatient settings only, expands from roughly 3,000 to 87,000 codes. It should be noted that ambulatory settings will continue to use CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) procedural codes.

Given this massive growth in coding scope, the importance of detailed clinical documentation becomes even more pronounced. Physicians and other healthcare providers typically are not trained to develop proper documentation skills in medical school or residency; nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) generally do not receive such training during graduate school or clinical rotations. Hospitals and healthcare systems need to compensate for this training deficiency by instituting educational programs and tools that align healthcare providers with proper documentation practices to clear the decks for successful transition to ICD-10.

ICD-10 requires physicians, NPs, and PAs to thoroughly document each and every patient encounter to a much greater level of specificity than is needed in ICD-9. Nonspecific or incomplete documentation within ICD-10 will cause delays, claim denials, cash-flow interruptions, and inaccurate quality reporting. Definition and terminology changes inherent in ICD-10, particularly for surgical procedures, will also require focused education and training.

At the end of the day, providers aren’t coders. They are far less concerned with ICD-10 codes than they are with improving quality of care. This is where ICD-10 can be viewed as a welcoming beacon on a rocky shore. It gives healthcare providers an incentive to establish a clinical documentation improvement (CDI) program. In fact, implementing and sustaining an effective CDI initiative should be a top priority for all healthcare organizations preparing for ICD-10. For those with no CDI program in place, the time to begin is now. Consider improved clinical documentation as essential equipment for maneuvering through the twists, turns, and churns that accompany the voyage to ICD-10.

Honora Roberts - Xerox
Honora Roberts is Vice President of Healthcare Provider Services at Xerox.

Laura Speek  - The Breakaway Group
Laura Speek is a Learning and Development Specialist at The Breakaway Group (a Xerox company).

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Timeline for Healthcare Organizations to Train for ICD-10 – ICD-10 Tuesdays

Posted on November 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Right as the AHIMA exhibit hall was closing (literally they turned out the lights on us), I pulled out my video camera and got the following interview with Garry Huff, MD, CEO and President of Huff DRG Review Services. In the video, Dr. Huff addresses the challenge of training doctors on ICD-10. As a doctor, he offers a unique perspective on what works and what doesn’t work when training doctors on ICD-10. Plus, he looks at the timeline organizations should plan for training doctors on ICD-10.

I really love Dr. Huff’s approach to teaching doctors ICD-10. They realize that doctors have limited time and attention span. They have doctors from a specific specialty training that specialty. They do a gap analysis on the training needs so they can focus that training on what each specific provider needs to learn.

Dr. Huff also suggested that a doctor can be trained on ICD-10 with this type of specialty and provider specific training in 30 minutes to an hour. Is this enough time to train doctors on ICD-10?

Prediction: AHIMA 2013 Will Be ICD-10 All Day All the Time

Posted on October 25, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This will be my third year in a row attending the AHIMA Annual Conference (I think they call it the AHIMA Convention) which starts on Monday in Atlanta. I’m particularly excited for this year’s event because I have so many healthcare IT friends in Atlanta. Plus, I always have a great time at the event and learn a lot.

This year we’ll actually have three different Healthcare Scene bloggers (Jennifer Dennar, Mandi Bishop, and myself). So you can be sure to get some really varied coverage from the event from a number of different perspectives.

As I consider all the pitches I’ve gotten and think about the work of AHIMA, I can already tell that AHIMA 2013 is going to be dominated by one topic: ICD-10.

I honestly don’t think it’s even going to be close. I believe this is a very good thing. Hopefully the focus of attention on ICD-10 a little less than a year out from the ICD-10 implementation date is a good thing for the industry. You can be sure I’ll be doing what I can to help people better understand how they can prepare for ICD-10 and some of the tools out there.

Assuming I’m not too overwhelmed with all the AHIMA ICD-10 talk, next week I’d like to start a weekly series of posts on ICD-10. It feels right to call it ICD-10 Tuesdays. So, look forward to that series in the future.

Also, Agency Ten22 is holding the third annual tweet up at AHIMA on Tuesday evening. You can find more details and RSVP here. I’m reminded of the first tweetup. Beth from Agency Ten22 told me she had a nice suite. I told her I’d bring some Twitter friends and the AHIMA tweetup was born. Big thanks to Beth and her team for carrying on the tradition.

Finally, the rest of my travel for this year is booked. I’ll be at the Digital Health Conference (20% discount if you use the code HCS) in NYC in November and at the mHealth Summit in Washington DC in December. I hope to see many of you at one of these events.