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ICD-10 Claims Monitoring Infographic

Posted on June 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m told that there are only 92 days left for Congress to delay ICD-10 until the deadline to implement ICD-10. A few weeks ago we published a great post from Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum, that talked about a part of ICD-10 preparation that is often forgotten: Claims Monitoring.

I know this is going to be a major problem for many healthcare organizations and is going to cause some major cash flow problems if they don’t get on top of their ICD-10 claims by implementing some sort of ICD-10 claims monitoring process. ICD-10 hiccups are the perfect excuse for a payer not to pay your claims.

For those that prefer a more visual approach to this discussion, Vishal and his team have put together an infographic that shares the same message as his post. Pretty cool. What won’t be cool is if you’re stuck with a lot of unpaid claims thanks to ICD-10. Make sure you and your organization are ready to deal with it.
What Are You Doing to Monitor Your Claims

Full Disclosure: ClinicSpectrum is a sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

ICD-10 Upgrades – Are We All Systems Go?

Posted on June 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I thought that Brad’s characterization of ICD-10 as an upgrade to a system was pretty intriguing. I don’t think most people view it as an upgrade to a system, but a new layer of regulation. Although, maybe we’re just playing with words.

I recently asked a coding expert whether they thought that ICD-10 was finally going to happen or whether it would be delayed again. His response to me was that the republican leadership now sees last years delay of ICD-10 as a major cost to the US health system. So, he said that there’s no way they’re going to delay ICD-10 again.

I’ve seen some of the verbiage coming out of congress as far as the cost of an ICD-10 delay. I’m not sure I trust those numbers, but there are some in congress who have seen those numbers and believe that another delay in ICD-10 would cost the people in the US a lot of money. That’s a powerful force for keeping the current ICD-10 timeline. However, I still know there are a number of people in congress who see the ICD-10 law as a cost much bigger than any costs thanks to a delay. I don’t see these people letting up.

So, I’m not as confident as my coding expert friend that ICD-10 will not be delayed. I think there’s still some risk that another ICD-10 delay could be tagged on to some other unrelated, but important legislation and slips through. However, if I were a betting man, I’d put my money down on ICD-10 not being delayed any more. The advocates for no more ICD-10 delay are much better organized this year and I think their message is getting across to the right people in Washington.

Either way, I think that a healthcare organization has to be prepared for ICD-10 this year. Not doing to is putting the financial health of your healthcare organization at risk. We’d all love some assurance that indeed ICD-10 won’t be delayed anymore. However, I don’t think we’re going to get it. We have what we have and most signs I’ve seen point to no more delay to ICD-10. My suggestion would be to make sure you and your IT systems are prepared for the change. About time for us to start rolling up our ICD-10 preparation posts again.

Top 10 Google Searches in 2014 – What Would Be Healthcare IT’s Top Searches?

Posted on December 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year Google releases it’s top trending searches in the US and the world. This list isn’t the most frequently searched terms (according to Google the most popular searches don’t change) but is a year versus year comparison of what terms were trending in 2014.

US Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
Flappy Bird
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
ISIS
Ferguson
Frozen
Ukraine

Global Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Flappy Bird
Conchita Wurst
ISIS
Frozen
Sochi Olympics

Pretty interesting look into 2014. Also amazing that a mobile app (Flappy Bird) made the list for the first time. There’s two healthcare terms: Ebola and ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I wondered what this list would look like for healthcare IT. So, I decide to take a guess at what I think would be the trending healthcare IT terms of 2014:

ICD-10 Delay
EHR Penalties
Wearables
Meaningful Use Stage 2
Epic
Obamacare
FHIR
Cerner-Siemens
HIPAA Breaches
Patient Engagement

What do you think of the list? Would you order it differently? Are there terms you think should be on the list?

Killing Meaningful Use and Proposals to Change It

Posted on September 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Isn’t it nice that National Health IT Week brings people together to complain about meaningful use? Ok, that’s only partially in jest. Marc Probst, CIO of Intermountain and a member of the original meaningful use/EHR Certification committee (I lost track of the formal name), is making a strong statement as quoted by Don Fluckinger above.

Marc Probst is right that the majority of healthcare would be really happy to put a knife in meaningful use and move on from it. That’s kind of what I proposed when I suggested blowing up meaningful use. Not to mention my comments that meaningful use is on shaky ground. Comments from people like Marc Probst are proof of this fact.

In a related move, CHIME, AMDIS and 15 other healthcare organizations sent a letter to the HHS Secretary calling for immediate action to amend the 2015 meaningful use reporting period. These organizations believed that the final rule on meaningful use flexibility would change the reporting period, but it did not. It seems like they’re coming out guns blazing.

In even bigger news (albeit probably related), Congresswoman Renee Ellmers (R-NC) and Congressman Jim Matheson (D-UT) just introduced the Flexibility in Health IT Reporting (Flex-IT) act. This act would “allow providers to report their Health IT upgrades in 2015 through a 90-day reporting period as opposed to a full year.” I have yet to see any prediction on whether this act has enough support in Congress to get passed, but we could once again see congress act when CMS chose a different course of action like they did with ICD-10.

This story is definitely evolving and the pressure to change the reporting period to 90 days is on. My own personal prediction is that CMS will have to make the change. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Happy National Health IT Week!

Practical Application of Watson with EHR

Posted on July 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since Watson made its debut on Jeopardy, I haven’t been able to not check out what Watson was doing next. No doubt what Watson did on Jeopardy was impressive. However, it’s one thing to do what it did on Watson. It’s another thing to commercialize the Watson into something useful.

I’d long been hearing that Watson was going to be great for healthcare IT and that healthcare would really benefit from the technology. However, everything I saw felt very conceptual as opposed to practical and implemented. So, I was really interested in talking with Modernizing Medicine about their EHR integration with Watson.

You can find my interview with Daniel Cane and Dr. Michael Sherling, Founders of Modernizing Medicine, talking about Watson and some of the other cool ways they’re trying to help doctors make use of the data in an EHR in the video below. Plus, we even talk ICD-10 and MU 2 delay as well.

Note: Modernizing Medicine is a Healthcare Scene advertiser.

What Would Make Us Not Delay ICD-10 in 2015?

Posted on July 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at the HFMA ANI conference in Las Vegas, I talked to a lot of people about the future of healthcare reimbursement. Talk of ICD-10 and the ICD-10 delay came up regularly with most of us rolling our eyes that ICD-10 was delayed again. Some argued that we still need to be prepared, but from what I’m seeing the majority of the market just pushed their plans out a year and will pick them up again later this year or early next year.

With that said, we all agreed that every organization will be much more hesitant preparing for ICD-10 next year since they’re afraid that ICD-10 will just be delayed again.

As I had these discussions, I started thinking about what will be different in 2015 when it comes to ICD-10? As I asked people this question, all of the same arguments that we made in 2014 are what we’re going to have in 2015. Some of them include: the rest of the world adopted this years ago, we’re falling behind on the data we’re capturing, we need more specificity in the way we code so we can improve healthcare, etc etc etc.

Considering these arguments, what will be different next year?

All of the above arguments for not delaying ICD-10 were valid in 2014 and we’ll be just as valid in 2015. Can you think of any reasons that we should not delay ICD-10 in 2015 that weren’t reasons in 2014? I can’t think of any. The closest I’ve come is that with the extra year, we’re better prepared for ICD-10. Although, given people’s propensity to delay, does anyone think we’ll be much better prepared for ICD-10 in 2015 than we were in 2014? In some ways I think we’ll be less prepared because many will likely think the delay will happen again.

Given that the environment will be mostly the same, why wouldn’t we think that ICD-10 will be delayed again in 2015?

Personally, I’ll be watching CMS and HHS closely and see what they say. I think this year they looked really bad when they very publicly proclaimed that ICD-10 was coming at HIMSS just to be hit from the side by the ICD-10 delay. I’d hope that this time CMS will work with Congress to know what they’re planning or thinking before they make such strong assertions. Of course, this would mean that they’d have to understand what Congress is thinking (not an easy task).

What’s unfortunate is that many of the things you need to do to prepare for ICD-10 can also benefit you under ICD-9. The smart organizations understand this and are focusing on clinical documentation improvement (CDI) as the best way to prepare for ICD-10, but still benefit from the program today.

ICD-10 Flight Delayed, But Keep Your Bags Packed – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer_web

If you’ve ever traveled to a country that doesn’t speak your native tongue, you can appreciate the importance of basic communication. If you learn a second language to the degree that you’re adding nuance and colloquialisms, you’ve experienced how much easier it is to explain a point or to get answers you need. What if you’re expected to actually move to that foreign country under a strict timeline? The pressure is on to get up to speed. The same can be said for learning the detailed coding language of ICD-10.

The healthcare industry has been preparing in earnest to move from ICD-9 coding to the latest version of the international classification of diseases. People have been training, testing and updating information systems, essentially packing their bags to comply with the federal mandate to implement ICD-10 this October — but the trip was postponed. On April 1, President Barrack Obama signed into law a bill that includes an extension for converting to ICD-10 until at least Oct. 1, 2015. What does this mean for your ICD-10 travel plans?

Despite the unexpected delay, you’ll be living in ICD-10 country before you know it. With at least another year until the deadline, the timing is just right to start packing and hitting the books to learn the new codes and to prepare your systems. For those who have a head start, your time and focus has not gone to waste, so don’t throw your suitcases back into the closet. The planning, education and money involved in preparation for the ICD-10 transition doesn’t dissolve with the delay – you’ve collected valuable tools that will be put to use.

Although many people, including myself, are disappointed in the change, we need to continue making progress toward the conversion; learning and using ICD-10 will enable the United States to have more accurate, current and appropriate medical conversations with the rest of the world. Considering that it is almost four decades old, there is only so much communication that ICD-9 can handle; some categories are actually full as the number of new diagnoses continues to grow. ICD-9 uses three to five numeric characters for diagnosis coding, while ICD-10 uses three to seven alphanumeric characters. ICD-10 classifications will provide more specific information about medical conditions and procedures, allowing more depth and accuracy to conversations about a patient’s diagnosis and care.

Making the jump to ICD-10 fluency will be beneficial, albeit challenging. In order to study, understand and use ICD-10, healthcare organizations need to establish a learning system for their teams. The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, provides training for caregivers and coders that eases learning challenges, such as the expanded clinical documentation and new code set for ICD-10. Simply put, there are people can help with your entire ICD-10 travel itinerary, from creating a checklist of needs to planning a successful route.

ICD-10 is the international standard, so the journey from ICD-9 codes to ICD-10 codes will happen. Do not throw away your ICD-10 coding manuals and education materials just yet. All of these items will come in handy to reach the final destination: ICD-10.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

To ICD-10 Delay or Not To ICD-10 Delay

Posted on March 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: It looks like this bill has passed the house with a voice vote. I believe it still needs to be passed by Congress and not be vetoed by the President.

UPDATE 2: Late on 3/31/14, the Senate passed the bill which delays ICD-10 by a vote of 64 – 35. Barring a veto from the President, the bill will go forth and the ICD-10 implementation date will be moved to October 1, 2015. All of the discussion for the bill was around the SGR fix with no conversation around the ICD-10 delay. It’s unlikely that the President would even consider a veto of this bill.

We’d already stoked the ICD-10 delay fires in Kyle Samani’s post on “Why ICD-10?” before the news came out yesterday that a one year ICD-10 delay was put in an SGR bill. Word on the street was that the bill would be put up for a vote today. However, I hear now that the vote on the bill is going to be delayed at least until tomorrow.

The reports are saying that this bill was developed by John Boehner and Harry Reid which likely means they have enough votes to make it a reality. I read that Nancy Pelosi said on CSPAN that the bill wasn’t perfect, but needed to be passed. My only question is whether the delay in voting is because they’re still trying to cull votes for the bill or something else.

As I suggested in my post linked above, my guess is that congress is hearing from both those for delaying ICD-10 and those who oppose delaying ICD-10. I bet they consider the response a wash and so it won’t sway them either way. Plus, I bet that most in Congress are only talking about the SGR portion of the bill without much discussion on the ICD-10 delay.

This decision is going to cut many people. Let me share a few of the comments I’ve read.

First, from the LinkedIn AHIMA group, here’s a coder perspective on the delay:

I think of the coder who is a single mom struggling from pay check to pay check who had to spent $500 (or more) to take a course and another $60 on the proficiency exam, spent time away from caring for her family to prepare for the implementation only to have the rug pulled right from under her. The $560 is likely her discretionary income for the month. Who is thinking or her?

Don’t tell us there will absolutely be NO delays, allow us to spend our hard earned money to prepare, and then say “just kidding– we are going to tease you with another year — make you spend more money — promise no delays — then change our mind again!” “Oh, and the check is in the mail.” Yes ladies and gentleman, this is our government working “for the people.” And I ask, why does Congress even care about ICD-10? Do they even have a clue what they are voting for or against? They are trying to quietly slip it into a bill so that no one notices. I could be wrong, but it sounds like the work of a single lobbyist and Senator/Congressman. I would like to know the name of the person who put that language into the bill. Democracy at its finest!

Now a perspective that is likely shared by the thousands of ill-prepared practices and hospitals (although, my guess is that it was their larger organizations that lobbied for it, not the individual practices and hospitals that aren’t prepared):

As bad an idea as it is, a majority of practices, and a significant number of hospitals, health systems and other providers are, or feel, very un-prepared for the transition, and so have lobbied for delay. D.C. insiders say it’s a done deal.

On the other side is the prepared health IT vendors that think that a delay is letting the ill prepared off the hook. One EHR vendor sent me an email with this message:

This really is a pain to a vendor like us that is all ready to launch and take good care of our clients with ICD-10. Everything we programmed came out great and we are ready to go.

This feeling doesn’t just apply to health IT vendors that have procrastinated, but to all the procrastinators:

Why prolong the inevitable, again? The procrastinators should be penalized, not the rest of us who’ve been preparing for it.

What we all want most is certainty. HHS came out with certainty during HIMSS when they said that there would be no more delays with ICD-10. Unfortunately, HHS doesn’t control congress.

I’ve been reading a lot of reports that a delay in ICD-10 would cost billions of dollars. I’m not sure I trust those numbers, but it’s no surprise that those numbers don’t take into account the impact and cost of ICD-10 being implemented. Personally, I see costs in ICD-10 going forward and costs in ICD-10 being delayed. I’m not sure we can quantify either number accurately.

Obviously, this is a fast moving story, so I’ll update this post with any updates as I get them. Feel free to leave comments with updates as well.

Are You Ready for ICD-10?

Posted on May 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve been writing about ICD-10 for a long time now including the delay of ICD-10. Based on the CMS comments at HIMSS, there will be no more delays in the implementation of ICD-10. Barring something crazy, ICD-10 will go into effect on October 1, 2014. The question is, are you ready?

If you’re not ready or you’re not sure if you’re ready, check out this ICD-10 whitepaper. It’s a nice straightforward look at ICD-10 and provides 6 steps you can use to make sure you’re ready for ICD-10. Plus, it has some good background on ICD-10 and the basics of the ICD-10 code structure.

Of course, many of you might be wondering why I’m posting about ICD-10 if it’s still over a year away. If you’re asking this, then you must not have looked into ICD-10 very much. It’s not that I think the switch over from ICD-9 to ICD-10 is really that hard, but it takes some time to ensure that all of your systems are ready for the switch over and that your staff are trained.

As is discussed in the ICD-10 whitepaper I mentioned, the first step is to do an impact analysis so you know how you’re doing on your path to ICD-10. Maybe you won’t need a year to get there, but you’ll want to do that impact analysis now so you know either way.

I won’t be surprised if some EMR vendors aren’t ready for ICD-10. It’s kind of insane to consider, but I can see a few scenarios where this happens. Plus, you want to make sure your EMR is able to send proper ICD-10 codes to your billing systems. In some cases you may need to “ride” your EMR vendor to make sure they’re ready. This may take time.

The reality is that the provider is responsible for ICD-10 whether their various software and billing companies are ready or not. So each practice should be proactive in their approach to ICD-10.

ICD-10 Fact: We’ve been using ICD-9 since 1979 and ICD-10 was first brought to the US in 1994.

ICD-10 Benefits – Where are they?

Posted on March 8, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the interesting topics of discussion at HIMSS was around the delay of ICD-10. However, I have yet to find an answer to what I think is probably the most important question around ICD-10. I posted the question and some other thoughts related to the question on the EHR Guy’s passionate post about ICD-10. Here’s my question and comments:

“What are the true benefits to using ICD-10?”

I’ve read story after story about ICD-10 (including this post) and so far I’ve only seen people giving general lip service to the basic idea that more specifically quantified data will somehow have a benefit to the healthcare system. Darren in the comment above says, “The fact that ICD-10 helps so many electronic and quality initiatives right now, or as pointed out above, are, in fact, required to achieve them”

What are the electronic and quality initiatives to which he speaks? What are the true benefits that we’ll get if we go to ICD-10? I haven’t seen enough of these examples.

We could also look at this same question another way. The rest of the world has been using ICD-10 for a lot longer than us. What have been the benefits that the rest of the world has seen from their use of ICD-10 that we haven’t seen in the US since we’re still on ICD-9?

I’m not trying to say that there aren’t benefits. I’m just saying if there are, then why aren’t we hearing more stories with concrete examples of the benefits? If there are, I’d love to see them and make them more widely known.

The EHR Guy offered this reply:

What you are asking for is reasonable and fair.

I will post, in a future blog, examples of why migrating to ICD-10 has beneficial clinical quality outcomes other than the intended reimbursement aspect of it which has been the main purpose of implementing it here in the United States.

But in essence a deep specificity would eliminate the erroneous coding accompanied by bulk documentation to justify the claim to be reimbursed.

Achieving semantic interoperability with erroneous coding is impossible. I’ve been in aggregation projects where abstracting information from HL7 messages was futile because no one in the healthcare organization seemed to understand what was contained in them.

This will be a very lively topic for months to come. I look forward to your participation in the discussions.

I look forward to the EHR Guy offering some more concrete examples in future blog posts. Although, I think this question deserves much more attention. I’ll admit to not being an expert on ICD-10. I know enough to be dangerous. So, I’d love to hear some of the real life benefits that ICD-10 has provided other countries and/or the benefits the US will get from ICD-10 implementation.

If we don’t have more stories and example of these benefits, then instead the stories related to the cost and inconvenience of ICD-10 (which are easy to find) will dominate the conversation. If that’s the case, then we can be sure that ICD-10 will be delayed.