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Funny Codes Exist in ICD-9 Too…And It Hasn’t Been An Issue

Posted on July 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently thinking about ICD-10 and how in many ways it’s been a punchline of jokes since there are some pretty crazy ICD-10 codes. I’ve enjoyed the crazy and funny ICD-10 codes as much as the next person (we all need a good laugh on occasion), but I think it’s generally been bad for the move of ICD-10. Now that I think ICD-10 will not be delayed again, ICD-10 is no joke.

With that in mind, I wanted to put the funny ICD-10 code discussion to rest. So, I asked on Twitter if there were any “funny” ICD-9 codes (of course if you have any of these things, it wouldn’t be too funny). In response to my tweet, Jennifer Della’Zanna created this great post that puts the “funny” ICD-10 codes in perspective. She also provided me this list of ICD-9 codes that could possibly be considered funny codes as well:

E928.4 External constriction caused by hair
E918 Caught accidentally in or between objects
E005.1 Injury from activities involving yoga
E913.3 Accidental mechanical suffocation by falling earth or other substance
E018.2 Injury from activities involving string instrument playing
E827.4 Animal drawn vehicle accident injuring occupant of streetcar
E845.0 Accident involving spacecraft injuring occupant of spacecraft
E905.4 Centipede and venomous millipede (tropical) bite causing poisoning and toxic reactions
E917.7 Striking against or struck by furniture with subsequent fall
E927.1 Overexertion from prolonged static position
E927.2 Excessive physical exertion
E928.0 Prolonged stay in weightless environment

You could see a nice sticker with a picture for E905.4 as a centipede bite, that’s funnier than the full description. That’s what’s happened with many of the ICD-10 codes that are made into jokes. However, that misses my point. My point is that we’ve had some funny ICD-9 codes for a long time and it’s never been an issue. The ICD-10 codes that have been made into jokes won’t be an issue either. It’s time to move on to the ICD-10 codes that do matter and make sure we’re ready for ICD-10 come October 1st.

Funny ICD-10 Codes Have Ruined the ICD-10 Branding

Posted on October 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The people at online physician community, QuantiaMD, recently sent me a list of the top 3 “Crazy ICD-10 Codes” that they got from their community. It was quite interesting to learn that when they asked their community for these codes, they yielded double the participation the company typically sees. No doubt, physicians have globbed on to these funny and crazy ICD-10 codes. I’ll be honest. I’ve gotten plenty of laughs over some of the funny ICD-10 codes as well. Seriously, you can’t make some of this stuff up. Here’s a look at the top 3 crazy ICD-10 codes they received (and some awesome color commentary from the nominators):

1. W16.221 – Fall into bucket of water, causing drowning and submersion. I didn’t realize mopping the floor was so dangerous!
2. 7. Z63.1 – Problems in relationship with in-laws. Really, Who does not?
3. V9733xD – Sucked into jet engine, subsequent encounter. Oops I did it again.

While these codes are amazing and in many respects ridiculous, they’re so over the top that they’ve branded ICD-10 as a complete joke. For every legitimate story about the value of ICD-10 there have probably been 10 stories talking about the funny and crazy ICD-10 codes. You can imagine which story goes viral. Are you going to share the story that talks about improvement in patient care or the one that makes you laugh? How come the story about their being no ICD-9 code for Ebola hasn’t gone viral (Yes, ICD-10 has a code for Ebola)?

Unfortunately, I don’t think the proponents of ICD-10 have done a great job making sure that the dialog on the benefits of ICD-10 is out there as well. Yes, it’s an uphill battle, but most things of worth require a fight and can easily get drowned out by humor and minutiae if you give up. If ICD-10 really is that valuable, then it’s well worth the fight.

My fear is that it might be too late for ICD-10. Changing the ICD-10 brand that has been labeled as a joke is going to be nearly impossible to change. However, there are some key people on the side of ICD-10. CMS for starters. If you can get the law passed, then the ICD-10 branding won’t matter.

One thing I do know is that doing nothing means we’ll get more and more articles about Funny ICD-10 codes and little coverage of why ICD-10 needs to be implemented. I encourage those who see the value in ICD-10 to make sure their telling that part of the story. If you don’t have your own platform to share that part of the story, I’ll be happy to offer mine. Just drop me a note on my contact us page.

Hilarious ICD-10 Holiday Parody Video

Posted on December 28, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, Nuesoft has a great video team that’s put together some great videos in the past. Most of you will remember the HL7 Interface Lady Gaga video from Nuesoft and for those who don’t know that video, go and watch it. Sometimes we take ourselves too seriously in healthcare and these are some great reminders to keep it lively.

In fact, Nuesoft’s last video was far too formal for me. So much so that I let them know in the comments of the video how disappointing it was to have a formal video when I was use to Nuesoft’s creative masterpieces. I’m happy to report that Nuesoft is back again with a great ICD-10 Holiday parody video. I was laughing through the whole thing and I think you’ll enjoy the video embedded below.

Crazy and Funny ICD-10 Codes

Posted on September 23, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Wall Street Journal put out an interesting article about the switch from ICD-9 coding to ICD-10. The title mocks the ICD-10 codes, Walked Into a Lamppost? Hurt While Crocheting? Help Is on the Way”, and the subtitle is funny as well, “New Medical-Billing System Provides Precision; Nine Codes for Macaw Mishaps”

I must admit that I’m not very well steeped in the history of ICD-9 and ICD-10. Nor am I that familiar with the process that was used for creating the voluminous ICD-10 coding system. I’m more of a practical person and so I’ve been more interested in EHR’s ICD-10 preparedness and the timeline for ICD-10 implementation. Seems like we won’t have much choice.

I guess I should have known that going from 18,000 codes (which doctors can’t even stay up with as is) to 140,000 codes would offer some crazy and hilarious codes. Here’s some examples from the article linked above:

There are codes for injuries in opera houses, art galleries, squash courts and nine locations in and around a mobile home, from the bathroom to the bedroom.

And the appropriate follow up question from a family physician, “Really? Bathroom versus bedroom? What difference does it make?”

Some other interesting codes mentioned in the article:
R46.1 is “bizarre personal appearance”
R46.0 is “very low level of personal hygiene”
W22.02XA, “walked into lamppost, initial encounter
W22.02XD, “walked into lamppost, subsequent encounter”
V91.07XA, “burn due to water-skis on fire”

There are codes for injuries received while sewing, ironing, playing a brass instrument, crocheting, doing handcrafts, or knitting—but not while shopping. There are codes for injuries from birds such as: a duck, macaw, parrot, goose, turkey or chicken. I’d hate for my doctor to choose the “bitten by turtle” versus “struck by turtle” code. My insurance company might not reimburse the second.

Do people know of any other off the wall ICD-10 codes?

While this has me a little concerned to see ICD-10 in action, hopefully it will give all of you a good laugh going into the weekend. I can’t say I saw a code for any sort of Friday inefficiency, but there probably should be.