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A Little Fun at #HIMSS13 – The Harlem Shake Meme

Posted on March 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A lot of business gets done at HIMSS. Although, I think that most would agree that one of the biggest values of going to HIMSS is the relationships you build which lead to business in the future. HIMSS often just lays the groundwork of relationships that can make future things happen.

With that in mind, it’s not surprising that there’s a lot of craziness that happens at HIMSS as well. Turns out a lot of people agreed that doing the Harlem Shake would be a great way to bond with people at HIMSS. Plus, I have to admit that I enjoy the break from the sometimes straight laced HIMSS event.

With that in mind, I’ve aggregated the Harlem Shake videos that were done at HIMSS 2013. They are all pretty entertaining to watch.

First up is a Harlem Shake at the Metro booth. This might be my favorite, because it includes a robot, a couple Healthcare Scene bloggers, and a number of #HITsm friends. I think you’ll enjoy it too. (Watch for the behind the scenes footage to be posted later).

Next up is the Emdeon Harlem Shake video. I love the girl in the chair that’s shaking while spinning. Too funny.

Finally, check out the CDW Harlem Shake. Nice job on the costumes for this one.

Nice work by all involved. I love seeing stuff like this since I think many take things a little bit too seriously. Nothing wrong with having a little fun in the process.

Where You’ll Find Me at HIMSS 2013

Posted on February 28, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I can’t believe that HIMSS 2013 is finally here. Well, it’s almost here. I fly out on Saturday, and I’m seeing the tweets come in from the various vendors who are arriving in New Orleans to setup their booths. For those that can’t attend, we’ll do our best to give you a peek into the event. For those that can attend, I always love to meet those who read EMR and HIPAA in person. The following is a list of events that I’m hosting, participating in or otherwise engaged. All of these events and more are also listed in the Influential Networks HIMSS 2013 Event Guide.

I look forward to seeing many of you at these great events and in the hallways of HIMSS. It’s always great to see old friends and make new ones.

#SocialMedia and #Influence Tweetup
Monday, March 4, 2013
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Description:
Discuss the best approaches to influencing audiences around your ideas, products or services with John Lynn and Shahid Shah, InfluentialNetworks.com. Learn how social media can be used to get your messages out to those who matter. Discover common myths and misconceptions about new media, and learn proven strategies and techniques to get the most out of social media.
Location: Social Media Center

Discussion with Rita Bowen, Chief Privacy Officer at HealthPort, About HIPAA Omnibus Rule
Tuesday, March 5, 2013
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Description:
Come learn from one of the leading experts on HIPAA, Rita Bowen, as she discusses the latest details on the new HIPAA Omnibus rule with John Lynn, HealthcareScene.com.  We’ll talk about all the changes with business associates, how to make sure your compliant, and making a smooth transition to the new rule.
Location: HealthPort Booth #6841

New Media Meetup at #HIMSS13 Sponsored by docBeat
Tuesday, March 5, 2013
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Description:
Great food, free drinks, and time to mingle with the best and brightest that healthcare social media has to offer.  Come and meet people you’ve only connected with online and find new friends.  The New Media Meetup is where the online world meets offline.
Location: Mulate’s Party Hall – 743 Convention Center Boulegvard, New Orleans, LA
Register to attend: http://tinyurl.com/HIMSS13NMM

Point of Care Video with Metro
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
12:30 PM – 1:00 PM
Description:
Come learn more with John Lynn, HealthcareScene.com, about Metro’s latest point-of-care systems, AccessPoint mobile computing system, and their Metro Access platform.  We’ll be shooting a video of their latest products.  Don’t worry, you don’t have to be in the video unless you want to be.
Location: Metro Booth #6312

Interoperability Needs Action, Not Talk – #HIMSS13 Blog Carnival

Posted on February 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When you talk to people outside of healthcare about the value of healthcare IT, you will often get a response that healthcare IT is fantastic because it makes it so easy for medical data to be shared with who needs the data when they need it. Those of us in healthcare IT know that this is far from the reality of what’s possible with healthcare data today. This is really unfortunate, because the promise of technology in healthcare is to make the movement of data possible. We’re currently missing out on the benefits of this promise.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but I’m sick and tired of hearing the excuses for why healthcare data can’t be shared. We’ve heard them all: privacy, security, data governance, payment model, etc etc etc. Yet we go to the HIMSS Interoperability Showcase and see that the technology to start sharing data is there, but what seems to be missing is the willpower to push the data sharing through despite the challenges and naysayers.

Maybe Farzad is on to something when he called for EHR vendors to do what’s “Moral and Right.” There’s no more moral or right thing someone can do in healthcare than to make healthcare data interoperable. It’s not only EHR vendors that need to do this, but hospital institutions and doctors offices as well.

We need some brave leaders in healthcare IT to step up and start sharing data. No, I don’t want an announcement at HIMSS that a healthcare organization has partnered with a vendor to start sharing data. I don’t want a new organization formed to assist with healthcare data sharing initiatives. I don’t need another book on the challenges of HIE. We don’t need a session on HIEs and data sharing standards. No, we need brave organizations that say that sharing healthcare data is the right thing to do and we’re making it happen.

I’m not suggesting an organization should do anything ruthless or reckless. I’m suggesting that healthcare organization start DOing something as opposed to talking about it. The time for talking is over and the time for DOing is here. Healthcare data interoperability won’t happen until we make this choice to DO instead of TALK.

I’m not even asking for a healthcare organization to start sharing all their healthcare data everywhere. In fact, I think that’s another failed interoperability strategy that we seem to keep trying over and over. If you try to solve all of our healthcare interoperability problems in one major project, you’ll end up doing nothing and solve none of the problems.

Instead a successful interoperability strategy will focus on sharing one meaningful piece of healthcare data while still keeping in mind that this is just the start. Connect the healthcare data end points with that one meaningful piece of data. Once you make that connection, others will start to wonder why that same process can’t be used for other important and valuable pieces of healthcare data. This is exactly the push that healthcare interoperability needs. We need departments and providers jealous of other departments and providers that are sharing their data. The same principle of jealousy can apply across institutions as well.

Yes, this will take a forward looking leader that’s willing to take what many in healthcare would consider a risk. Imagine a hospital CIO whose stuck trying to explain why their hospital is sharing data that will help doctors provide better care to their patients. Imagine a hospital CIO explaining why they’re driving healthcare costs down by lowering the number of duplicate tests that are done because they already have the data they need thanks to interoperable healthcare data. I’d hate for a hospital CEO to have to explain why they’ve reduced hospital readmissions because they shared the hospital data with a patient’s primary care doctor.

Maybe implementing interoperability in healthcare isn’t such a brave thing after all. In fact, it’s a brave thing for us not to be sharing data. Why aren’t we holding our healthcare institutions accountable for not sharing data that could save lives, lower costs, and improve healthcare? Why are we ok with non-profit institutions worrying more about profit than the real stakeholders their suppose to be serving? Are we really so far gone that healthcare organizations can’t do something so obvious: sharing healthcare data?

Think of all the other major healthcare initiatives that would benefit from being able to share healthcare data where it’s needed. Meaningful Use, Obamacare (Affordable Care Act if you prefer), Clinical and Business Intelligence, Mobile Health, ACO’s, population health, etc could all benefit from healthcare institutions that embraced interoperable healthcare data.

Who’s going to take the lead and start doing what we all know should be happening? It won’t happen by #HIMSS13, but over cocktails at HIMSS I hope some hospital CIOs, doctor groups, EHR vendors, and other medical providers come together to do what they know is the right thing to do as opposed to just talking about it.

The above blog post is my submission to the #HIMSS13 Blog Carnival.

Using Healthcare Social Media Effectively

Posted on February 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you probably know, Shahid Shah and I recently did a webinar on “how to differentiate your products and services.” In case you missed it, we have an archive of the presentation on the Influential Networks website (The webinar auto plays). I think we do a pretty good job talking at a high level about many of the mistakes that we see companies making when they’re trying to communicate their message.

Turns out that pretty much everything that we talked about in the webinar could be applied to all of social media. Many people try to make social media too complex. At the end of the day social media is simply a platform to connect and communicate with people.

Once you realize that social media connects people, then you realize why many people call it the social media community. It really is a a community of people and just like in person communities they have social norms and expectations. One of the big messages we shared in the webinar above was that the smartest strategy is to Be a Good Member of the Community.

Much like in real life, those on social media are going to quickly make judgments about your involvement in social media. Are you going to be one who gives before you get or are you going to be someone there just trying to sale something. You can imagine which strategy works best.

The idea of give before you get is a powerful one and not always easy to accomplish. By our very nature we start thinking about what we can get out of a situation. The ironic thing is that if you approach social media with a give before you get mentality, you end up getting much more than you give away. Many think that the idea of give before you get is an altruistic type of mentality when in fact it’s really not. It’s incredibly selfish.

The difference with give before you get and altruism is that there’s no transactional relationship. You’re not giving something of value to someone with a fixed requirement that they give something of value in return. Instead you’re giving something of value to multiple members of the community over time and over time the community will return the favor. This is a hard concept for many organizations to understand. It’s a long term investment in community that doesn’t have a direct ROI. Therefore, it makes it difficult for a marketing or PR manager to sell it to their company.

Full Disclosure: The idea of “Give Before You Get” was taken from Brad Feld‘s awesome book called Startup Communities. I don’t think Brad imagined them being applied to online communities, but it’s amazing to see how the philosophy is the same offline as it is online.

With some of the healthcare social media strategies laid out, I want to offer some practical suggestions on how to participate in Healthcare Social media.

My number one social media tool (and the only one I pay to use) is HootSuite. It’s worth every dollar I pay for it (Although, it has a fully functional Free 30 Day Trial and a limited, but useful free version). Here are some of the top features for me:

Supports Multiple Social Media Accounts – I have multiple Twitter accounts and so I find this extremely useful, but you can also use it to manage Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+ all from one interface. I also love that it’s all web based, so regardless of which computer I’m using the interface is the same for me to be able to monitor and participate in social media.

#Hashtag Tracking – I love the way that you can add a stream to your Hootsuite interface for specific hashtags. For example, I have the #HITsm hashtag stored in my Hootsuite account under my @ehrandhit Twitter page. I’ll soon be adding the #HIMSS13 hashtag as we get closer to HIMSS. There are plenty of other ways to track hashtags, but Hootsuite is my favorite. Plus, it makes it easy to reply and/or RT messages using the hashtag.

Mobile – I’ve used a number of mobile interfaces (mostly for Twitter) and all of them were disappointing to me until I found Hootsuite. This is particularly true when you have multiple accounts. It’s really the only social media app I need on my mobile phone.

Scheduled Messages – While most of my tweets are sent when I think of them, there are also times when I don’t want a message to go out until a certain moment in time. The ability to schedule tweets to appear in the future is a real benefit to Hootsuite. For example, before HIMSS, I’m planning to schedule some messages about the New Media Meetup I’ll be hosting on Tuesday (more details tomorrow). It’s much easier to create these messages from my computer before HIMSS than trying to send them out during the business of HIMSS.

Auto Post – I mostly use dlvr.it to automatically send out my blog posts to my social media profiles, but Hootsuite can be used for this as well. I think that dlvr.it does a better job for this, but I do use Hootsuite to auto post to some social media channels that dlvr.it doesn’t support.

Social Analytics – I haven’t used this piece of Hootsuite as much since I have a lot of other analytics programs that I use. However, if I was a large organization trying to justify my social media spend, I’d be looking into the deep reporting that’s possible from Hootsuite.

Collaboration – Hootsuite provides a powerful set of tools for organizations to collaborate on social media. The best way for an organization to do social media is to involve a large portion of the company in the social media efforts. One of the biggest challenges with this approach is knowing who has done what on social media so you don’t have an overlap of effort which wastes time and can be embarrassing. Hootsuite’s team function is a great way to know who responded to which social media message and if there’s a message that still needs a response. Plus, you can do other things like assigning tasks to certain team members. Every organization that has more than one person participating in social media should take a look at these features.

I used Hootsuite’s feature set as a way for me to describe some different ways to use social media. Certainly each of the functions above can be found in many other social media tools. I’ve just found HootSuite to be the best implementation of all these features in one package, but at the end of the day it’s just a tool like many others. However, these tools can make your participation in the healthcare social media community much more efficient and effective.