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#HIMSS16 Mix Tape

Posted on February 5, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

On February 29th the #HealthIT community will descend on Las Vegas for the annual HIMSS conference and exhibition.

One of the best parts about attending HIMSS is getting the chance to meet people in real life who I interact with through social media. There is nothing quite like meeting someone face to face for the first time yet feeling like you already know them. I think hugging and fist bumps are the official greetings at HIMSS. It’s an absolute blast to be able to share stories and laughs with likes of Mandi Bishop, John Lynn , Rasu Shrestha and Wen Dombrowski.

With an expected attendance of 45,000 this year, I’m hoping to meet even more people than ever before at the various HIMSS gatherings.

Last year, ahead of HIMSS15, I decided to do a fun blog post. I asked some friends to send me a song they thought reflected what was happening in #HealthIT at the time. I compiled everyone’s selections along with the reasons behind their choice. I called it the HIMSS15 Mix Tape. The response was amazing. I had so many people DM me and stop me at the conference to give me their song choice. Even John Lynn blogged about it.

This year, I asked an even larger number of friends to contribute a song. So without further rambling, here is the #HIMSS16 Mix Tape. Enjoy!

HIMSS16 Mix Tape

Night on Bald Mountain – Disney’s Fantasia. Chosen by Regina Holliday @ReginaHolliday. “Disney. Because although morning will come, we now walk among the terrors.”

Confident – Demi Levato. Chosen by Mandi Bishop @MandiBPro. “For a couple reasons: 1) it’s beyond time #HealthITChicks / #WomenInHIT got equal recognition and pay for their contributions to the field, and I’m seeing an increasing strength of voice supporting those efforts, 2) patients have had enough of their attempts to engage being discounted by clinicians and other caregivers, and we are all demanding respect and inclusion at the table of our healthcare decisions.”

Stronger – Kelly Clarkson. Chosen by John Lynn @techguy. “This should be the anthem of those of us in healthcare IT.  First, do no harm, but don’t be afraid to take some risks and make mistakes.  Not taking some risks is killing more people than doing something and sometimes making mistakes.  Healthcare will be stronger for the mistakes we make.”

Runnin’ Down A Dream –  Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. Chosen by Melody Smith Jones @melsmithjones. “I got into this industry because my grandmother died of cancer in rural USA in 2003. I’ve been running down the dream of care everywhere ever since. I believe 2016 will bring us the most growth in Connected Health that we have seen to date.”

Talk to Me – Stevie Nicks. Chosen by David Harlow @healthblawg. “The chorus includes the line: “You can talk to me/You can set your secrets free, baby” which can be read as a coded message to legacy systems … One of the verses goes: “Our voices stray from the common ground where they/Could meet/The walls run high/ … / Oh, let the walls burn down, set your secrets free” — a prescient call to interoperability, to communication, to enabling broader collaboration across provider, payor and health care information technology silos. We’re almost there, Stevie.”

Heroes – David Bowie. Chosen by Nick van Terheyden @drnic1. “Because I love that track and was sad to see David Bowie leave this universe. But also: We need to be heroes for Healthcare and I hope Healthcare Technology can beat the madness of our system and Ch-ch-ch-ch-change the world:

A million dead-end streets / And every time I thought I’d got it made / It seemed the taste was not so sweet…… / We can be Heroes, just for one day / We can beat them, for ever and ever … ICYMI – I blended the lyrics from David Bowie’s Changes with Heroes”

Another Brick in the Wall – Pink Floyd. Chosen by Rasu Shrestha @RasuShrestha. “In memory of Meaningful Use ‘All in all it was just a brick in the wall…’ “

Numb – Linkin Park. Chosen by me @Colin_Hung. I think many physicians, nurses, administrators and patients are numb from all the competing priorities this past year and from the years of chasing Meaningful User dollars. I think this verse sums it up:

I’m tired of being what you want me to be / Feeling so faithless, lost under the surface / Don’t know what you’re expecting of me / Put under the pressure of walking in your shoes / (Caught in the undertow, just caught in the undertow) / Every step that I take is another mistake to you

Fire – Jimi Hendrix. Chosen by Chad Johnson @OchoTex. “The reason is simple: HL7 FHIR continues to dominate the headlines and discussions around health data interoperability, and rightfully so. FHIR will bring exciting changes to interoperability.”

Taking Care of Business – Bachman-Turner Overdrive. Chosen by Charles Webster @wareFLO. “Taking care of business in healthcare means getting sh*%$t done. Effectively and efficiently accomplishing goals is only possible with great…wait for it…WORKFLOW”

I Want It All – Queen. Chosen by Joe Lavelle @Resultant. “Because we want it all – Interoperability, “our damn data”, #mhealth, Patient Engagement, Population Health, Telemedicine. etc.”

Robot Rock – Daft Punk. Chosen by AJ Montpetit @ajmontpetit. “We’re heading to the integration of AI into healthcare to create a streamlined experience, and assist in comprehension of all the multiple factors that each patient has individually.”

Upgrade U – Beyoncé. Chosen by Cari McLean @carimclean. “I’ll go with a song that not only always makes me dance but one that reflects a growing happening in healthcare. I chose this song because the EHR replacement market is growing as the rip and replace trend continues and health information exchange is prioritized.”

Give Me Novacaine – Green Day. Chosen by Linda Stotsky @EMRAnswers. “LOL- because providers are in PAIN!!! They need something to soften the blows”

Changes – David Bowie. Chosen by Brad Justus @BradJustus. “A classic from a classic and something that is a constant in #HealthIT”

Fight Song – Rachel Platten. Chosen by Jennifer Dennard @JennDennard. “I think it encapsulates the #healthITchicks ethos – not to mention patient advocates’ – quite well :)”

 What Do You Mean – Justin Bieber. Chosen by Sarah Bennight @sarahbennight. “For SO many reasons. What do you mean MU is going away? What do you mean you need me to fill out ANOTHER demographic profile, what do you mean you don’t have my allergies? What do you mean by interoperable? I could go on all day, but we all have real jobs to do….like to figure out this healthcare IT thing :) Plus in the Justin B song…you hear a clock…do you ever feel like Health IT is running out of time? I don’t agree with JB on ANYTHING, but I agree we are running out of time.”

Shape of Things – David Bowie. Chosen by Pat Rich @pat_health. “In my mind this song evokes the futuristic world of health IT in a steampunk/sci-fi sort of way”

Hello – Adele. Chosen by Bill Bunting @WTBunting. “Because there is an emerging side of healthcare that’s trying to break free and be heard (i.e. adoption), and no one is answering the call to do so”

Under Pressure – Queen & David Bowie. Chosen by Joy Rios @askjoyrios. “There is so much pressure to get through these health IT initiatives unscathed and there’s so much at risk if they get it wrong.  I see providers across the country dealing with so much change, when they mostly just want to focus on their practice. Unfortunately, the changes are not letting up. I feel like the healthcare system is right in the middle of its metamorphosis… not a caterpillar anymore, but by no means a butterfly!”

Please Please Me – The Beatles. Chosen by Jim Tate @jimtate. “Providers want better EHRs”

New New Minglewood Blues – The Grateful Dead. Chosen by Brian Ahier @ahier. “Because I was inspired by this @healthblawg post ‘The New New Meaningful Use’ “

EHR State of Mind – ZDoggMDChosen by Andy DeLaO @CancerGeek. “Does it really need an explanation? J”

Dha Tete – Pandit Shyamal Bose. Chosen by Wen Dombrowski @HealthcareWen. “Some reasons I like this song:

  • Focus, Mindfulness
  • Flow states
  • Collaboration, Staying in Sync with each other (it is actually 2 people duet)
  • Speed, Moving fast
  • Precision, deciveness
  • Artistry, Beauty”

You Can Get It If You Really Want – Jimmy Cliff. Chosen by Steve Sisko @ShimCode. “I believe true, widespread interoperability is not that far away. The technology, standards (FHIR, OpenNotes), and group consensus (outfits like CommonWell, The Sequoia Project) are finally coming together.

You can get it if you really want / But you must try, try and try, try and try / You’ll succeed at last

Do you have a song you think reflects #HealthIT or healthcare at the moment? Add it to the comments below!

[Update: Here is a link to a Spotify playlist of the entire #HIMSS16 Mix Tape https://open.spotify.com/user/12163763158/playlist/7mO6DlpVa4MoJ7roW0bqiG or if you like videos, here is a YouTube playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOxadHqniaPTYUUY5cMSmW14VZQpngUOU]

Making Precision Medicine a Reality with Dr. Delaney, SAP & Curtis Dudley, VP at Mercy

Posted on February 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live interview, you can watch the interview on YouTube below:

You can also watch the “after party” where Shahid Shah joins us and extends the discussion we started:

Making Precision Medicine a Reality-blog

Ever since President Obama announced the precision medicine initiative, it’s become a hot topic in every healthcare organization. While it’s great to talk theoretically about what’s happening with precision medicine, I’m always more interested with what’s actually happening to make medicine more precise. That’s why I’m excited to sit down with a great panel of experts that are actually working in the trenches where precision medicine is being implemented.

On Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Curtis Dudley from Mercy and Dr. David Delaney from SAP where we’re going to dive into the work Curtis Dudley and his team are doing at Mercy around perioperative services analytics that improved quality outcomes and reduced delivery costs.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

If you can’t join our live video discussion or want to learn more, check out Mercy’s session at HIMSS16 called “HANA as the Key to Advanced Analytics for Population Health and Operational Performance” on March 1, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. at SAP Booth #5828.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

7th Annual New Media Meetup at #HIMSS16 Sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions

Posted on January 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

7th Annual New Media Meetup - HIMSS16 in Chicago

For those of you planning to attend the HIMSS 2016 conference in Las Vegas, I’m excited to share the details of the 7th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS. For those who’ve missed the last 6 events, it’s a unique event that brings together healthcare IT bloggers, tweeters, and other social media influencers at the mecca of Healthcare IT conferences.

It’s incredible to think that this will be our 7th year hosting the New Media Meetup during HIMSS. Since HIMSS 2016 is returning to my hometown of Las Vegas, I knew we had to set a new bar for the event. Luckily our sponsor, Stericycle Communication Solutions, was on board with my ambitious plans. I hope everyone will spend some time checking out Stericycle Communication Solutions and thank them for sponsoring the event.

Here’s a quick summary of what we have planned for the event:
When: Wednesday 3/2 6:00-8:00 PM (Unofficial Karaoke after party starts at 8)
Where: Gilley’s at Treasure Island Casino – 3300 S Las Vegas Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89109 MAP (Treasure Island is a short walk across the street from the Venetian/Sands)
Who: Anyone who uses or is interested in New Media (Blogs, Twitter, Social Media, Periscope, Blab, etc)
What: Food, Drinks, Mechanical Bull, Dance Floor, Giveaways, and Amazing People

Register Here!

Note: We have limited space for the event and so like in past years, we’ll have to close registration once we reach capacity.

Sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions
SRCL Communication Solutions
Stericycle Communication Solutions helps bring patients and healthcare organizations closer together. We believe that the key to patient engagement and positive patient experiences is effective and timely communication.

Stericycle Communication Solutions offer a unique combination of Live Agent services and Technology products that allow patients and providers to interact through multiple communication channels: phone, email, voice, text and online. We provide scheduling (phone and online self-serve), physician referral, population health, payment, follow-up, after-hours answering, care coordination and appointment reminder solutions to over 27,000 organizations.

Learn more at www.stericyclecommunications.com

Those interested in the New Media Meetup at HIMSS will want to check out the full scale Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference that we’re hosting in Atlanta April 6-8, 2016. It’s a special 3 days devoted to health IT marketing and PR professionals.

A really big thank you also goes out to all the members of Influential Networks and Healthcare Scene that help promote the New Media Meetup. This event was originally brought together through social media and is still largely organized thanks to social media.

Let me know if you have any questions and I look forward to seeing many of you in Las Vegas very soon!

7th Annual New Media Meetup - HIMSS16 in Las Vegas

Tiny Budgets Undercut Healthcare’s Cyber Security Efforts

Posted on January 4, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

This has been a lousy year for healthcare data security — so bad a year that IBM has dubbed 2015 “The Year of The Healthcare Security Breach.” In a recent report, Big Blue noted that nearly 100 million records were compromised during the first 10 months of this year.

Part of the reason for the growth in healthcare data breaches seems to be due to the growing value of Protected Health Information. PHI is worth 10x as much as credit card information these days, according to some estimates. It’s hardly surprising that cyber criminals are eager to rob PHI databases.

But another reason for the hacks may be — to my way of looking at things — an indefensible refusal to spend enough on cybersecurity. While the average healthcare organization spends about 3% of their IT budget on cybersecurity, they should really allocate 10% , according to HIMSS cybersecurity expert Lisa Gallagher.

If a healthcare organization has an anemic security budget, they may find it difficult to attract a senior healthcare security pro to join their team. Such professionals are costly to recruit, and command salaries in the $200K to $225K range. And unless you’re a high-profile institution, the competition for such seasoned pros can be fierce. In fact, even high-profile institutions have a challenge recruiting security professionals.

Still, that doesn’t let healthcare organizations off the hook. In fact, the need to tighten healthcare data security is likely to grow more urgent over time, not less. Not only are data thieves after existing PHI stores, and prepared to exploit traditional network vulnerabilities, current trends are giving them new ways to crash the gates.

After all, mobile devices are increasingly being granted access to critical data assets, including PHI. Securing the mix of corporate and personal devices that might access the data, as well as any apps an organization rolls out, is not a job for the inexperienced or the unsophisticated. It takes a well-rounded infosec pro to address not only mobile vulnerabilities, but vulnerabilities in the systems that dish data to these devices.

Not only that, hospitals need to take care to secure their networks as devices such as insulin pumps and heart rate monitors become new gateways data thieves can use to attack their networks. In fact, virtually any node on the emerging Internet of Things can easily serve as a point of compromise.

No one is suggesting that healthcare organizations don’t care about security. But as many wiser heads than mine have pointed out, too many seem to base their security budget on the hope-and-pray model — as in hoping and praying that their luck will hold.

But as a professional observer and a patient, I find such an attitude to be extremely reckless. Personally, I would be quite inclined to drop any provider that allowed my information to be compromised, regardless of excuses. And spending far less on security than is appropriate leaves the barn door wide open.

I don’t know about you, readers, but I say “Not with my horses!”

Applying Technology to Healthcare Workforce Management

Posted on June 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I mentioned before that at HIMSS this year I made a shift in focus from EHR technology to a look at what’s next after EHR. In most cases, the technology has some connection or tie to the EHR, but I was really interested to see where else a healthcare organization can apply technology beyond the EHR software.

I found one such case when I met with Ron Rheinheimer from Avantas. For those not familiar with Avantas, they’re a healthcare scheduling and labor management solution. In most cases, their workforce solution is something the nurses choose and often the CNO. I imagine that’s why it’s not talked about nearly as much as things like the EHR. It takes a pretty progressive CIO at a hospital to be able to see through all the noise of other regulations and work with the CNO on a workforce management solution. Or it takes a pretty vocal CNO who can make the case for the solution.

Ron Rheinheimer from Avantas made a pretty good case for why workforce management should have a much higher priority for hospital CIOs. He noted that about 60% of a hospital’s budget is labor expenses and 50% of the labor budget is for nursing. It’s no wonder that nurses take it hard when a hospital goes through layoffs thanks to an EHR implementation. However, given those numbers, optimizing your workforce could save your organization a lot of money.

I think this is particularly true as hospital systems get larger and larger. We’ve all seen the trend around hospital system consolidation and as these organizations get larger their staffing requirements get much more complex. Most of them start moving towards a centralized nurse staffing model. They start working on a floating pool of nurses in the hospital. While humans are amazing, once things get complex, it’s a great place for technology to assist humans.

Ron Rheinheimer also told me about the new incentive models that many hospitals are employing to be able to incentivize nurses to take the hard to fill shifts. Night shift differential has long been apart of every workforce, but with technology you can use analytics to really understand which shifts are the hardest to fill and reward your nurses appropriately for taking those hard to fill shifts. My guess is that we’re still on the leading edge of what will be possible with technology and managing the schedule in a hospital. Real time dynamic pricing for shifts is something that only technology could really do well.

As you can tell, I’m new to this area of healthcare technology. However, I find it fascinating and I believe it’s an area where technology can really improve the current workflow. I look forward to learning more.

HIMSS15: Adoption Still a Problem for Organizations Swapping EHRs – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on May 20, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Todd Stansfield, Instructional Writer from The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Todd Stansfield

Each year the Health Information and Management Systems Society’s (HIMSS) annual conference is the Super Bowl of health IT. No other conference boasts more attendees ranging from health IT innovators and collaborators to pioneers. This year 40,000 plus participants descended on Chicago, all eager to learn about the new direction, trends, and solutions of the industry.

As always, buzzwords were aplenty—interoperability, care coordination, patient experience, and value-based care, to mention a few. During her keynote address on April 16, Karen DeSalvo, National Coordinator for the ONC, called the current state of health IT the “tipping point.” In 2011 the ONC released its four-year strategic plan focused on implementing and adopting electronic health records (EHRs). Now, DeSalvo says the industry is changed and ready to move beyond EHRs to technologies that will create “true interoperability.”

Enlightening conversations were happening among the crowded booths, hallways, and meeting rooms between organizations looking to ‘rip and replace’ their current EHR for a new one. While some organizations are struggling to unlock data across disparate systems, others are looking to upgrade their current system for one compatible with ICD-10, Meaningful Use, analytics solutions, or a combination of these. Still others are looking to replace systems they dislike for lack of functionality, vendor relationships, etc. In many cases, replacing an EHR is needed to ensure interoperability is at the very least viable. This buzz at HIMSS is a strong indicator that EHRs are still an important and essential part of health IT, and perhaps some organizations have not reached the tipping point.

In addition to the many challenges these organizations are facing—from data portability, an issue John Lynn wrote about in August 2012, to the cost of replacing the system—leaders are agonizing over the resistance they are facing from clinician end users. How can these organizations force clinicians to give up systems they once resisted, then embraced and worked so hard to adopt? How can leadership inspire the same level of engagement needed for adoption? The challenge is similar to transitioning from paper to an EHR, only more significant. Whereas the reasons for switching from paper were straightforward—patient safety, efficiency, interoperability, etc.—they are not so clear when switching applications.

Clinicians are also making harsher comparisons between applications—from every drop-down list, to icon, to keyboard shortcut. These comparisons are occurring at drastically different phases in the adoption lifecycle. Consider the example of an end user needing to document a progress note. In the old EHR, this user knew how to copy forward previous documentation, but in the new system she doesn’t know if this functionality even exists. Already the end user is viewing the new system as cumbersome and inefficient compared to the old application. Multiply this comparison by each of the various tasks she completes throughout her day, and the end user is strongly questioning her organization’s decision to make the change.

This highlights an important point: Swapping one EHR for another will take more planning, effort, and strategy than a first-ever implementation. The methods for achieving adoption are the same, but the degree to which they are employed is not. Leadership will not only have to re-engage end users and facilitate buy-in, they will have to address the loss of efficiency and optimization by replacing the old application.

Leadership should start by clearly outlining the reasons for change, a long-term strategy, as well frustrations end users can expect. They should establish a strong governance and support structure to ensure end users adhere to policies, procedures, and best practices for using the application. The organizations that will succeed will provide end users with role-based education complete with hands-on experience completing best practice workflows in the application. Education should include competency tests that assess end users’ ability to complete key components of their workflow. Additionally, organizations must capture and track performance measurements to ensure optimized use of the system and identify areas of need. And because adoption recedes after application upgrades and workflow enhancements, all efforts should be sustained and modified as needed.

While HIMSS15 brought to the stage a wealth of new ideas, solutions, and visions for the future of health IT, the struggle to adopt an EHR has not completely gone away. Many organizations are grappling with their current EHR and choosing to replace it in hopes of meeting the triple aim of improving care, costs, and population health. For these organizations to be prepared for true interoperability, they must overcome challenges unseen in paper to electronic implementations. And if done successfully, only then will our industry uniformly reach the tipping point, a point where we can begin to put buzzwords into practice.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Some High Level Perspectives on FHIR

Posted on April 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Before HIMSS, I posted about my work to understand FHIR. There’s some great information in that post as I progress in my understanding of FHIR, how it’s different than other standards, where it’s at in its evolution, and whether FHIR is going to really change healthcare or not. What’s clear to me is that many are on board with FHIR and we’ll hear a lot more about it in the future. Many at HIMSS were trying to figure it out like me.

What isn’t as clear to me is whether FHIR is really all that better. Based on many of my discussions, FHIR really feels like the next iteration of what we’ve been doing forever. Sure, the foundation is more flexible and is a better standard than what we’ve had with CCDA and any version of HL7. However, I feel like it’s still just an evolution of the same.

I’m working on a future post that will look at the data for each of the healthcare standards and how they’ve evolved. I’m hopeful that it will illustrate well how the data has (or has not) evolved over time. More on that to come in the future.

One vendor even touted how their FHIR expert has been working on these standards for decades (I can’t remember the exact number of years). While I think there’s tremendous value that comes from experience with past standards, it also has me asking the question of why we think we’ll get different results when we have more or less the same people working on these new standards.

My guess is that they’d argue that they’ve learned a lot from the past standards that they can incorporate or avoid in the new standards. I don’t think these experienced people should be left out of the process because their background and knowledge of history can really help. However, if there isn’t some added outside perspective, then how can we expect to get anything more than what we’ve been getting forever (and we all know what we’ve gotten to date has been disappointing).

Needless to say, while the industry is extremely interested in FHIR, my take coming out of HIMSS is much more skeptical that FHIR will really move the industry forward the way people are describing. Will it be better than what we have today? I think it could be, but that’s not really a high bar. Will FHIR really helps us achieve healthcare interoperability nirvana? It seems to me that it’s really not designed to push that agenda forward.

What do you think of FHIR? Am I missing something important about FHIR and it’s potential to transform healthcare? Do you agree with the assessment that FHIR very well could be more of the same limited thinking on healthcare data exchange? I look forward to continue my learning about FHIR in the comments.

My Overall View of Healthcare IT After HIMSS15

Posted on April 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I fly home from HIMSS15 (literally), I’ve been thinking how to summarize my annual visit to the mecca of healthcare IT conferences we know as HIMSS. I’ve seen a bunch of numbers around attendance and exhibitors and I believe they’re somewhere around 43,000 attendees and 1300 exhibitors. It definitely felt that massive. The interest in using technology to improve healthcare has never been higher. This shouldn’t be a surprise for anyone. When I look at the path forward for healthcare, every single scenario has technology playing a massive role.

With that in mind, I think that the healthcare IT world is experiencing a massive war between a large number of competing interests. Many of those interests are deeply entrenched in what they’ve been doing for seemingly ever. Some of these companies are really trying to dig in and continue to enjoy the high ground that they’ve enjoyed for many years. This includes vendors at HIMSS, but also many large and small healthcare organizations (the small entrenched healthcare organizations weren’t likely at HIMSS though) who enjoyed the status quo.

The problem with this battlefield is that they’re battling against a massive shift in reimbursement model. They can try and stay entrenched, but the shift in healthcare business model is going to absolutely force them to change. This is not a question of if, but when. This doesn’t keep these organizations from bombing away as they resist the changes.

If you’re a healthcare startup company entering the battlefield (to continue the analogy), you’re out in the open and absolutely vulnerable. You’re very rarely the target of this major entrenched players, but sometimes you get impacted by collateral damage. As the various organizations throw bombs at each other you have to work hard to avoid getting in their way. This is a tricky challenge.

Even more challenging to these startup companies is they don’t have a way to access many of the entrenched companies so they can work together around a common vision. Most of the startups would love to work with the entrenched healthcare companies, but they don’t even have a way to start the conversation.

The mid size healthcare IT companies are even more interesting. They’ve started to carve a space for them in the battle and many of the entrenched healthcare IT vendors are scared at what this means for them. They’re using every means possible to disrupt the competition. At HIMSS I saw the scars from many of these battles.

Certainly this description is true of many industries. Welcome to economic competition and capitalism. Although, this year at HIMSS I found the battle to be much more intense. In the past couple years meaningful use opened up new territories to be “conquered.” There was enough “land” to go around that companies were often working to capture new territories as opposed to battling their competitors for the same opportunities. That’s why I think we’re in a very different market today versus the past couple years.

The great thing is that in periods of turmoil often comes the most amazing innovations. I believe that’s what we’re going to see over the next couple years. Although, I predict that most of these innovations are going to come from places we don’t expect. It’s just too hard for companies to innovate themselves out of business. There are a few exceptions in history and we might see a few exceptions in healthcare. However, my bet is on the most successful companies being those that choose to obliterate as opposed to automate.

What’s most exciting to me is that healthcare organizations and patients seem to be ready for change. There are varying degrees of readiness, but I believe I’ve seen a groundswell of change that’s coming for healthcare. As a blogger this of course has me excited, but as a patient it has me excited as well.

What were your thoughts of HIMSS 2015? What do you think of the analogy?

While the battle is on in healthcare IT, the best part of HIMSS is always the people. Every industry has some bad apples, but for the most part I’m always deeply impacted by the good nature of so many people I meet at HIMSS. They are sincere in their efforts to try and improve healthcare for good. We certainly have our challenges in healthcare, but similar to what George Bush said in his keynote, I’m optimistic that the good people in healthcare will be able to produce amazing results. The best days of healthcare are not behind us, but are ahead of us.

Some Inspiring and Thought Provoking Ideas from the HIMSS15 Final Keynote

Posted on April 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The last keynote at HIMSS is always inspiring for me. They’ve almost always ended up being one of the more prominent memories for me from HIMSS. This year was no different. I really need to chew on a bunch of what was said still, but Jeremy Gutsche was throwing out nuggets of wisdom throughout his talk. Here are some tweets that show what I mean:

HIMSS15 Social Media and Influencer Thoughts

Posted on April 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think this has been the case the past couple years. The Tuesday of HIMSS seems to always be my day of social media. This year was no different. This was highlighted by a meetup that Shahid Shah and myself did at the HIMSS spot. At first I wasn’t sure if anyone would show for the event. Luckily, 1-2 people were there early and so at least we wouldn’t be talking to ourselves. In fact, Shahid asked for those that weren’t there for the meetup to free up the seats for those that were there for it. Luckily, when I wasn’t watching a whole bunch of people showed up and the event was standing room only. I guess Shahid can really draw a crowd.

What was impressive was the mix of the audience. There was a large group of some of the most influential people in social media (I won’t name names since there were too many and I’ll forget someone), along with a number of newer people. I love that mix and particularly love the new people that are still finding their way. Sometimes they seem a bit like dear in the headlights. That’s ok. That’s part of the fun of learning.

What’s clear to me is that social influencing as really matured for many people, but there are still a lot of people that are trying to figure it out. It’s amazing to see the difference. I’ll be interested to watch this evolve. I still see so much opportunity with it and many aren’t taking advantage of it.

Then, my night was capped off with the New Media Meetup at HIMSS15. This is the 6th year I’ve hosted this event and it seems to get better each year. I’m always humbled by the list of people that register to attend. Plus, I’m extremely appreciative of Stericycle and Patient Prompt that basically through a big party for all these amazing people. It’s always amazing to see the broad spectrum of people that attend and how down to earth they are even given many of their significant social influence. Plus, what an amazing preview for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference.

I didn’t go into many details on what was at the session or who attending the New Media Meetup, but you can get a lot of that information by checking out the #HITMC hashtag. Thanks to all of my new and old social media friends that made today special. I keep learning from you.

I’ll leave this with just one insight that really hit home to me when I shared it in the meetup. Really caring about the people you’re connecting with, the topics you’re sharing and the work you’re doing really comes through in social media. If you’re faking it, people will usually see that. Plus, really caring about those you connect with on social media and the things you share will change your life in really amazing ways.

Reminds me of the wrestler, Jessie Ventura who became governor of Minnesota. One time I heard him say he didn’t have to have a good memory, because he always said what he thought and never told things that were half true. On social media, if you’re faking it, it makes it hard to remember all the things you’ve faked. If you’re authentic and real, it makes it so much easier.