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The Future Of…Patient Engagement

Posted on March 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Healthcare has a major challenge when it comes to the term “Patient Engagement.” $36 billion of government money and something called meaningful use has corrupted the word Patient Engagement. While meaningful use requires “5% patient engagement”, that’s a far cry from actually engaging with patients. Anyone that’s attested to meaningful use knows what I mean.

As we move past meaningful use, what then will patient engagement actually look like?

When I start to think about the future of patient engagement, I’m taken back to my experience with a new primary care provider that’s trying to Restore Humanity to Healthcare (see Restore Humanity to Healthcare part 2 as well). In this case, I’m exploring the idea of unlimited primary care along with a primary care team that includes a doctor, but also includes a wellness coordinator that’s interested in my wellness and not just my presenting problem.

Once you take the payment portion out of primary care, it dramatically changes the equation for me. Gone are the fears of going to the doctor because you don’t want to pay the co-pay. Gone are the days where a doctor needs to see you in the office in order to be able to make money from the visit. With unlimited primary care, an email, phone call or text message that solves the problem is a great solution for the doctor and the patient.

Of course, this model of primary care is only one example of the shift that’s going to drive us to patient engagement. ACOs and value based care models are going to require a much deeper relationship between doctors and patients. Trust me that 5% patient engagement through an online portal isn’t going to be enough in these new models.

Plus, these new models are going to really convert our current sick care system into a true healthcare system. I like to call this new model “Treating Healthy Patients.” Quite frankly we’re not ready for this change right now, but in the future we’ll have to adapt. The biggest change is going to be in how we define “patient” and “healthy.”

The wave of connected medical devices and innovation are going to completely reframe how we look at health. Instead of describing ourselves as healthy, the data will tell us that we’re all sick. We’re just at different points in the continuum of sickness.

In the future, patient engagement will be the key to treating each of us individually. The symptoms will change from coughing and vomiting to 85% risk for diabetes and 76% risk for a heart attack. We thought we had patient compliance issues when someone is coughing and vomiting (ie. something they want to fix). Now imagine patient compliance challenges when the patient isn’t feeling any pain, but they need to change something in order to avoid some major health problem.

I think this describes perfectly why we’re entering one of the most challenging times in healthcare. It’s a dramatic shift in how we think about healthcare and has a new set of more challenging problems that we’ve never solved. One of the keys to solving these new challenges is patient engagement.

The Future Of…Healthcare Innovation

Posted on March 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Innovation is a fascinating concept. Historians and philosophers have been thinking and investigating the key to innovation forever. I’m not sure anyone has ever found the true secret sauce to innovation. Every innovation I’ve ever seen has been a mix of timing, luck, and hard work.

Some times the timing is not right for a product and therefore it fails. The product might have been great, but the timing wasn’t right for it to be rolled out. Innovation always requires a little luck. Maybe it was the chance meeting with an investor that helps take and idea to the next level. Maybe it’s the luck of getting the right exposure that catapults your idea into a business. Maybe it’s the luck of the right initial end users which shape the direction of the product. Every innovation has also required hard work. In fact, the key to ensuring you’re ready for luck to be heaped upon you or to test if your timing is right is to put in the work.

The great thing is that it’s a brilliant time to be working on innovations in healthcare. We’re currently at the beginning of a confluence of healthcare innovations. Each one on its own might seem like a rather small innovation, but taken together they’re going to provide amazing healthcare innovations that shape the future of healthcare as we know it.

Let me give a few examples of the wave of innovations that are happening. Health sensors are exploding. Are ability to know in real time how well our body is performing is off the charts. There are sensors out there for just about every measurable aspect of the human body. The next innovation will be to take all this sensor data and collapse it down into appropriate communication and actions.

Another example, is the innovations in genomic medicine. The cost and speed required to map your genome is collapsing faster than Moore’s law. All of that genomic data is going to be available to innovators who want to build something on top of it.

3D printing is progressing at light speed. Don’t think this applies to healthcare? Check out this 3D printed prosthetic hand or this 3D printed heart. If you really want your mind blown, check out people’s work to provide blood to 3D printed organs.

If you think we’ve gotten value out of healthcare data, you’re kidding yourself. There are so many innovations in healthcare data that are sitting there waiting in healthcare data hoards. We just need to tap into that data and start sharing those findings with a connected healthcare system.

The mobile device is an incredible innovation just waiting for healthcare. We are all essentially walking around with a computer in our pocket now. We’ve already started to see the innovations this will provide healthcare, but it’s only just the beginning. This computer in our pocket will become the brain and communication hub for our healthcare needs.

I’m sure you can think of other innovations that I haven’t mentioned including robotics, health literacy, healthcare gaming, etc. What’s most exciting to me about the future of healthcare innovation is that each of these innovations will combine into a unforeseen innovation. The most powerful innovations in healthcare will not be a single innovative idea. Instead, it will come from someone who combines multiple innovations into one beautiful package.

The most exciting part of innovation is that it’s usually unexpected and surprising. I love surprises. What do you see as the future building blocks of innovation in healthcare?

6th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2015 Sponsored by Stericycle

Posted on March 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you planning to attend the HIMSS 2015 conference in Chicago, I’m excited to share the details of the 6th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS. For those who’ve missed the last 5 events, it’s the premiere coming together of healthcare IT bloggers, tweeters, and other social media influencers at the mecca of Healthcare IT conferences.

We’ve secured a great venue for the event that’s a perfect match for Chicago and social media. We know that many of you will be looking to satisfy your need for deep dish pizza while in Chicago and so we’re happy to solve that problem for you. Plus, along with some great food and drinks, we know you’ll love connecting and taking selfies with all the healthcare IT social media rockstars that will be in attendance.

A sincere thanks to Stericycle and one of their products, Patient Prompt, for sponsoring the New Media Meeetup and making it possible for those of us in New Media to enjoy a wonderful evening of food and drink together at HIMSS. I hope everyone will check out Stericycle and thank them for sponsoring the event.

Also, those interested in this event will want to check out the full scale Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference that we’re hosting in Las Vegas May 7-8, 2015. It’s a special 2 days devoted to health IT marketing and PR professionals.

Now for the details of the New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2015:

Register Here!

When: Tuesday 4/14 6:00-8:00 PM
Where: Gino’s East – 162 E Superior Street, Chicago, IL 60611 MAP
Who: Anyone who uses or is interested in New Media (Blogs, Twitter, Social Media, etc)
What: Food, Drinks, and Amazing People

Note: We have limited space for the event and so like in past years, we’ll have to close registration once we reach capacity.

Sponsored by Stericycle
Stericycle-1ColorSmall_2015
Stericycle help hospitals and providers acquire and retain patients through outsourced contact center services.

Our focus includes expanding patient access with one call resolution 24/7, identifying providers, scheduling appointments and helping consumers and patients to stay engaged in the health system while also meeting revenue objectives.

We also specialize in patient satisfaction and care compliance, including follow-up solutions after receiving care from physician, hospital, ED or other service provider. Learn more at www.stericyclecommunications.com

Sponsored by Patient Prompt
Patient Prompt
PatientPrompt is a cloud-based communications platform that delivers messages via email, voice and text. Through direct, real-time synchronization with over 100 EHR and Practice Management Systems, the platform can construct highly customized notifications based on the system data, a patient’s preferences and an organization’s needs. Learn more at patientprompt.com

A really big thank you also goes out to all the members of Influential Networks and Healthcare Scene that help promote the New Media Meetup. This event was originally brought together through social media and still today is organized using social media.

Let me know if you have any questions and I look forward to seeing many of you in Chicago very soon!

The Future Of…Healthcare Security

Posted on March 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Security is on the top of mind of most healthcare boards. I think the instruction from these boards to CIOs is simple: Keep Us Out of the News!

That’s an order that’s much easier said than done. If Google and Anthem can’t stay out of the news because of a breach, then a hospital or doctor’s office is fighting an uphill battle. Still don’t believe me, check out this visualization of internet attacks. It’s pretty scary stuff.

The reality is that you don’t really win a security battle. You can just defend against attacks as well as possible with the limited resources you have available. What is clear is that while still limited, healthcare will be investing more resources in security and privacy than they’ve ever done before.

The future of effective security in healthcare is going to be organizations who bake security into everything they do. Instead of hiring a chief security officer that worries about and advocates for security, we need a culture of security in healthcare organizations. This starts at the top where the leader is always asking about how we’re addressing security. That leadership will then trickle down into the culture of a company.

Let’s also be clear that security doesn’t have to be at odds with innovation and technology. In fact, technology can take our approach to security and privacy to the next level. Tell me how you knew who read the chart in a paper chart world? Oh yes, that sign out sheet that people always forgot to sign. Oh wait, the fingerprints on the chart were checked. It’s almost ludicrous to think about. Let’s be real. In the paper chart world we put in processes to try to avoid the wrong people getting their hands on the chart, but we really had no idea who saw it. The opposite is true in an EHR world. We know exactly who saw what and who changed what and when and where (Note: Some EHR are better than others at this, but a few lawsuits will get them all up to par on it).

The reality is that technology can take security and privacy to another level that we could have never dreamed. We can implement granular access controls that are hard and fast and monitored and audited. That’s a powerful part of the future of security and privacy in healthcare. Remember that many of the healthcare breaches come from people who have a username and password and not from some outside hacker.

A culture of security and privacy embraces the ability to track when and what happens to every piece of PHI in their organization. Plus, this culture has to be built into the procurement process, the implementation process, the training process, etc. Gone are the days of the chief security officer scapegoat. Technology is going to show very clearly who is responsible.

While I’ve described a rosy future built around a culture of privacy and security, I’m not naive. The future of healthcare security also includes a large number of organizations who continue to live a security life of “ignorance is bliss.” These people will pay lip service to privacy and security, but won’t actually address the culture change that’s needed to address privacy and security. They’ll continue the “Just Enough Culture of HIPAA Compliance.”

In the future we’ll have to be careful to not include one organization’s ignorance in a broad description of healthcare in general. A great example of this can be learned from the Sutter Health breach. In this incident, Sutter Health CPMC found the breach during a proactive audit of their EHR. Here’s the lesson learned from that breach:

The other lesson we need to take from this HIPAA breach notification is that we shouldn’t be so quick to judge an organization that proactively discovers a breach. If we’re too punitive with healthcare organizations that find and effectively address a breach like this, then organizations will stop finding and reporting these issues. We should want healthcare organizations that have a culture and privacy and security. Part of that culture is that they’re going to sometimes catch bad actors which they need to correct.

Healthcare IT software like EHRs have a great ability to track everything that’s done and they’re only going to get better at doing it. That’s a good thing and healthcare information security and privacy will benefit from it. We should encourage rather than ridicule organizations like CPMC for their proactive efforts to take care of the privacy of their patients’ information. I hope we see more organizations like Sutter Health who take a proactive approach to the security and privacy of healthcare information.

In fact the title of the blog post linked above is a warning for the future of healthcare IT: “Will Hospitals Be At Risk for HIPAA Audits If They Don’t Have HIPAA Violations?”

Security and privacy will be part of the fabric of everything we do in healthcare IT. We can’t ignore them. In order for patients to trust these healthcare apps, security will have to be a feature. Those in healthcare IT that don’t include security as a feature will be on shaky ground.

The Future Of…Healthcare Big Data

Posted on March 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

In yesterday’s post about The Future of…The Connected Healthcare System, I talked a lot about healthcare data and the importance of that data. So, I won’t rehash those topics in this post. However, that post will serve as background for why I believe healthcare has no clue about what big data really is and what it will mean for patients.

Healthcare Big Data History
If we take a quick look back in the history of big data in healthcare, most people will think about the massive enterprise data warehouses that hospitals invested in over the years. Sadly, I say they were massive because the cost of the project was massive and not because the amount of data was massive. In most cases it was a significant amount of data, but it wasn’t overwhelming. The other massive part was the massive amount of work that was required to acquire and store the data in a usable format.

This is what most people think about when they think of big data in healthcare. A massive store of a healthcare system’s data that’s been taken from a variety of disparate systems and normalized into one enterprise data warehouse. The next question we should be asking is, “what were the results of this effort?”

The results of this effort is a massive data store of health information. You might say, “Fantastic! Now we can leverage this massive data store to improve patient health, lower costs, improve revenue, and make our healthcare organization great.” That’s a lovely idea, but unfortunately it’s far from the reality of most enterprise data warehouses in healthcare.

The reality is that the only outcome was the enterprise data warehouse. Most project plans didn’t include any sort of guiding framework on how the enterprise data warehouse would be used once it was in place. Most didn’t include budget for someone (let alone a team of people) to mine the data for key organization and patient insights. Nope. Their funding was just to roll out the data warehouse. Organizations therefore got what they paid for.

So many organizations (and there might be a few exceptions out there) thought that by having this new resource at their fingertips, their staff would somehow magically do the work required to find meaning in all that data. It’s a wonderful thought, but we all know that it doesn’t work that way. If you don’t plan and pay for something, it rarely happens.

Focused Data Efforts
Back in 2013, I wrote about a new trend towards what one company called Skinny Data. No doubt that was a reaction to many people’s poor experiences spending massive amounts of money on an enterprise data warehouse without any significant results. Healthcare executives had no doubt grown weary of the “big data” pitch and were shifting to only want to know what results the data could produce.

I believe this was a really healthy shift in the use of data in a healthcare organization. By focusing on the end result, you can do a focused analysis and aggregation of the right data to be able to produce high quality results for an organization. Plus, if done right, that focused analysis and aggregation of data can serve as the basis for other future projects that will use some of the same data.

We’re still deep in the heart of this smart, focused healthcare data experience. The reality is that healthcare can still benefit so much from small slices of data that we don’t need to go after the big data analysis. Talk about low hanging fruit. It’s everywhere in healthcare data.

The Future of Big Data
In the future, big data will matter in healthcare. However, we’re still laying the foundation for that work. Many healthcare organizations are laying a great foundation for using their data. Brick by brick (data slice by data slice if you will), the data is being brought together and will build something amazingly beautiful.

This house analogy is a great one. There are very few people in the world that can build an entire house by themselves. Instead, you need some architects, framers, plumbers, electricians, carpenters, roofers, painters, designers, gardeners, etc. Each one contributes their expertise to build something that’s amazing. If any one of them is missing, the end result isn’t as great. Imagine a house without a plumber.

The same is true for big data. In most healthcare organizations they’ve only employed the architect and possibly bought some raw materials. However, the real value of leveraging big data in healthcare is going to require dozens of people across an organization to share their expertise and build something that’s amazing. That will require a serious commitment and visionary leadership to achieve.

Plus, we can’t be afraid to share our expertise with other healthcare organizations. Imagine if you had to invent cement every time you built a house. That’s what we’re still doing with big data in healthcare. Every organization that starts digging into their data is having to reinvent things that have already been solved in other organizations.

I believe we’ll solve this problem. Healthcare organizations I know are happy to share their findings. However, we need to make it easy for them to share, easy for other organizations to consume, and provide appropriate compensation (financial and non-financial). This is not an easy problem to solve, but most things worth doing aren’t easy.

The future of big data in healthcare is extraordinary. As of today, we’ve barely scraped the surface. While many may consider this a disappointment, I consider it an amazing opportunity.

The Future Of…The Connected Healthcare System

Posted on March 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

As I think about the future of a connected healthcare system, I get very excited. Although, that excitement is partially tamed by the realization that many of these connections could have been happening for a long time. A connected healthcare system is not a technological challenge, but is a major cultural challenge for healthcare.

The Data Connected Healthcare System
Implementation challenges aside, the future of healthcare absolutely revolves around a connected healthcare system. In the short term these connections will focus on sharing the right data with the right person at the right time. Most of that data will be limited to data inside the EHR. What’s shocking is that we’re not doing this already. I guess we are doing this already, but in a really disconnected fashion (see Fax machine). That’s what’s so shocking. We already have the policies in place that allow us to share healthcare data with other providers. We’re sharing that data across fax machines all day every day. Over the next 3-5 years we’ll see a continuous flow of this data across other electronic channels (Direct Project, FHIR, HIEs, etc).

More exciting to consider is the future integration of consumer health device data into the healthcare system. I’m certain I’ll see a number of stories talking about this integration at HIMSS already. These “pilot” integrations will set the groundwork for much wider adoption of external consumer health data. The key tipping point to watch for in this is when EHR vendors start accepting this data and presenting the data to doctors in a really intuitive way. This integration will absolutely change the game when it comes to connecting patient collected data with the healthcare system.

What seems even more clear to me is that we all still have a very myopic view of how much data we’re going to have available to us about a person’s health. In my above two examples I talk about the EHR patient record (basically physician’s charts) and consumer health devices. In the later example I’m pretty sure you’re translating that to the simple examples of health tracking we have today: steps, heart rate, weight, blood pressure, etc. While all of this data is important, I think it’s a short sighted view of the explosion of patient data we’ll have at our fingertips.

I still remember when I first heard the concept of an IP Address on Every Organ in your body reporting back health data that we would have never dreamed imaginable. The creativity in sensors that are detecting anything and everything that’s happening in your blood, sweat and tears is absolutely remarkable. All of that data will need to be connected, processed, and addressed. How amazing will it be for the healthcare system to automatically schedule you for heart surgery that will prevent a heart attack before you even experience any symptoms?

Of course, we haven’t even talked about genomic data which will be infiltrating the healthcare system as well. Genomic data use to take years to process. Now it’s being done in weeks at a price point that’s doable for many. Genomic medicine is going to become a standard for healthcare and in some areas it is already.

The connected healthcare system will have to process more data than we can even imagine today. Good luck processing genomic data, sensor data, device data, and medical chart data using paper.

It’s All About Communication
While I’ve focused on connecting the data in the healthcare system of the future, that doesn’t downplay the need for better communication tools in the future connected healthcare system. Healthcare data can discover engagement points, but communication with patients will cause the change in our healthcare system.

Do you feel connected to your doctor today? My guess is that most of you would be like me and say no (Although, I’m working to change that culture for me and my family). The future connected healthcare system is going to have to change that culture if we want to improve healthcare and lower healthcare costs. Plus, every healthcare reimbursement model of the future focuses on this type of engagement.

The future connected healthcare system actually connects the doctor’s office and the patient to treat even the healthy patient. In fact, I won’t be surprised if we stop talking about going for a doctor’s visit and start talking about a health check up or some health maintenance. Plus, who says the health check up or maintenance has to be in the doctors office. It might very well be over a video chat, email, instant message, social media, or even text.

This might concern many. However, I’d describe this as healthcare integration into your life. We’ll have some stumbles along the way. We’ll have some integrations that dig too deeply into your life. We’ll have some times when we rely too heavily on the system and it fails us. Sometimes we’ll fail to show the right amount of empathy in the communication. Sometimes we’ll fail to give you the needed kick in the pants. Sometimes, we’ll make mistakes. However, over time we’ll calibrate the system to integrate seamlessly into your life and improve your health based on your personalized needs.

The future Connected Healthcare System is a data driven system which facilitates the right communication when and where it’s needed in a seamless fashion.

Congress Asks ONC to Decertify EHRs That Proactively Block Information Sharing

Posted on December 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A big thanks to A. Akhter, MD for pointing out the 2014 Omnibus Appropriations bill (word is in Washington they’re calling it the CRomnibus bill) which asks ONC to address the interoperability challenges. HIMSS highlighted the 2 sections which apply to ONC and healthcare interoperability:

Office of the National Coordinator for Information Technology – Information Blocking.

The Office of the National Coordinator for Information Technology (ONC) is urged to use its certification program judiciously in order to ensure certified electronic health record technology provides value to eligible hospitals, eligible providers and taxpayers. ONC should use its authority to certify only those products that clearly meet current meaningful use program standards and that do not block health information exchange. ONC should take steps to decertify products that proactively block the sharing of information because those practices frustrate congressional intent, devalue taxpayer investments in CEHRT, and make CEHRT less valuable and more burdensome for eligible hospitals and eligible providers to use. The Committee requests a detailed report from ONC no later than 90 days after enactment of this act regarding the extent of the information blocking problem, including an estimate of the number of vendors or eligible hospitals or providers who block information. This detailed report should also include a comprehensive strategy on how to address the information blocking issue.”

Office of the National Coordinator for Information Technology – Interoperability.

The agreement directs the Health IT Policy Committee to submit a report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations and the appropriate authorizing committees no later than 12 months after enactment of this act regarding the challenges and barriers to interoperability. The report should cover the technical, operational and financial barriers to interoperability, the role of certification in advancing or hindering interoperability across various providers, as well as any other barriers identified by the Policy Committee.”

Everyone is talking about the first section which talks about taking “steps to decertify products that proactively block the sharing of information.” This could be a really big deal. Unfortunately, I don’t see how this will have any impact.

First, it would be really hard to prove that an EHR vendor is proactively blocking information sharing as required by EHR certification. I believe it will be pretty easy for an EHR vendor to show that they meet the EHR certification criteria and can exchange information using those standards. From what I understand, the bigger problem is that you can pass EHR certification using various flavors of the standard.

It seems to me that Congress should have really focused on why the meaningful use requirements were so open ended as to not actually get us to a proper standard for interoperability. They kind of get to this with their comment “certify only those products that clearly meet current meaningful use program standards.” However, if the MU standards aren’t good, then it doesn’t do any good to make sure that EHR vendors are meeting the MU program standard.

Of course, I imagine ONC wasn’t ready to admit that the MU standard wasn’t sufficiently defined for quality interoperability. Hopefully this is what will be discovered in the second piece of direction ONC received.

I could be wrong, but I don’t think the problem is EHR vendors not meeting the MU certification criteria for interoperability. Instead, I think the problem is that the MU certification criteria isn’t good enough to achieve simple interoperability between EHR systems.

If you think otherwise, I’d love to be proven wrong. Does this really give ONC some power to go after bad actors?

As an extension to this discussion, Carl Bergman has a great post on EMR and EHR which talks about what’s been removed from this bill. It seems that the Unique Patient Identifier gag rule has been removed.

mHealth and Where It’s Heading with Alan Portela

Posted on May 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite healthcare IT people to interview is Alan Portela, CEO of AirStrip. Having been in the healthcare IT industry and seen it from so many angles, he always has some interesting insight into what’s happening in the industry. It’s hard to understand the value that having attended HIMSS almost as many years I’ve been alive (Ok, not quite, but not too far off either) provides.

With this as a preface, I think you’ll really enjoy this interview I did with Alan. We talk about how to build a successful mHealth application, the changing EHR market, and the impact of FDA regulation. He provides some really great insights into the market.

Population Health Management (PHM) – The New Health IT Buzzword

Posted on May 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For some reason in healthcare IT we like to go through a series of buzzwords. They rotate through the years, but usually have a very similar meaning. The best example is EMR and EHR. You could nuance a difference between the two terms, but in practice they both are used interchangeably and we all know what it means.

With this in mind, I was intrigued by an excerpt from Cora Sharma’s post on Financial Analytics Bleeding into Population Health Management:

It appears that “population health management” (PHM) just has a better ring to it than “accountable care” or “HMO 2.0”. Increasingly, PHM is becoming an umbrella term for all of the operational and analytical HIT tools needed for the transition to value-based reimbursement (VBR), including EHR, HIE, Analytics, Care Management, revenue cycle management (RCM), Supply Chain, Cost Accounting, … .

On the other hand, HIT vendors continue to define PHM according to their core competencies: claims-based analytics vendors see PHM in terms of risk management; care management vendors are assuming that PHM is their next re-branded marketing term; clinical enterprise data warehouse (EDW) and business intelligence (BI) vendors argue that a single source of truth is needed for PHM; HIE and EHR vendors talk about PHM in the same breath as care coordination, leakage alerts and clinical quality measures (CQM); and so on.

Cora is right. Population Health Management does seem to be the latest buzzword and for some reason feels better to people than accountable care. I guess it makes sense. People don’t want to be held accountable for anything. However, they love to help a population be healthy.

Coming out of 30+ meetings with vendors at HIMSS this year I was asking myself a similar question. What’s the difference between an HIE, healthcare analytics, business intelligence, data warehouses (EDW) and even many of the financial RCM products? I see them all coming together into one platform. I guess it will be called population health management.

To Cora’s broader point in the post, there is a real coming together that’s happening between clinical and financial data in healthcare. All I can think is that it’s about time. The division of the data never really made sense to me. The data should be one and available to whatever system needs the data. ACOs are going to drive this to become a reality.

Healthcare CIO Mindmap

Posted on April 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During HIMSS, Citius Tech put out this great image they called the Healthcare CIO Mindmap. It’s a beautiful display of everything that’s happening in healthcare IT. Although, it’s also an illustration of the challenge we and hospital CIOs face. Is it any wonder that so many hospital CIOs feel overwhelmed?

Enjoy the Healthcare CIO Mindmap in all its glory below (Hint: Click on the image to see the full graphic):
Healthcare CIO Mindmap

I think that image is enough for anyone to chew on for one day. I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.