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Some High Level Perspectives on FHIR

Posted on April 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Before HIMSS, I posted about my work to understand FHIR. There’s some great information in that post as I progress in my understanding of FHIR, how it’s different than other standards, where it’s at in its evolution, and whether FHIR is going to really change healthcare or not. What’s clear to me is that many are on board with FHIR and we’ll hear a lot more about it in the future. Many at HIMSS were trying to figure it out like me.

What isn’t as clear to me is whether FHIR is really all that better. Based on many of my discussions, FHIR really feels like the next iteration of what we’ve been doing forever. Sure, the foundation is more flexible and is a better standard than what we’ve had with CCDA and any version of HL7. However, I feel like it’s still just an evolution of the same.

I’m working on a future post that will look at the data for each of the healthcare standards and how they’ve evolved. I’m hopeful that it will illustrate well how the data has (or has not) evolved over time. More on that to come in the future.

One vendor even touted how their FHIR expert has been working on these standards for decades (I can’t remember the exact number of years). While I think there’s tremendous value that comes from experience with past standards, it also has me asking the question of why we think we’ll get different results when we have more or less the same people working on these new standards.

My guess is that they’d argue that they’ve learned a lot from the past standards that they can incorporate or avoid in the new standards. I don’t think these experienced people should be left out of the process because their background and knowledge of history can really help. However, if there isn’t some added outside perspective, then how can we expect to get anything more than what we’ve been getting forever (and we all know what we’ve gotten to date has been disappointing).

Needless to say, while the industry is extremely interested in FHIR, my take coming out of HIMSS is much more skeptical that FHIR will really move the industry forward the way people are describing. Will it be better than what we have today? I think it could be, but that’s not really a high bar. Will FHIR really helps us achieve healthcare interoperability nirvana? It seems to me that it’s really not designed to push that agenda forward.

What do you think of FHIR? Am I missing something important about FHIR and it’s potential to transform healthcare? Do you agree with the assessment that FHIR very well could be more of the same limited thinking on healthcare data exchange? I look forward to continue my learning about FHIR in the comments.

My Overall View of Healthcare IT After HIMSS15

Posted on April 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I fly home from HIMSS15 (literally), I’ve been thinking how to summarize my annual visit to the mecca of healthcare IT conferences we know as HIMSS. I’ve seen a bunch of numbers around attendance and exhibitors and I believe they’re somewhere around 43,000 attendees and 1300 exhibitors. It definitely felt that massive. The interest in using technology to improve healthcare has never been higher. This shouldn’t be a surprise for anyone. When I look at the path forward for healthcare, every single scenario has technology playing a massive role.

With that in mind, I think that the healthcare IT world is experiencing a massive war between a large number of competing interests. Many of those interests are deeply entrenched in what they’ve been doing for seemingly ever. Some of these companies are really trying to dig in and continue to enjoy the high ground that they’ve enjoyed for many years. This includes vendors at HIMSS, but also many large and small healthcare organizations (the small entrenched healthcare organizations weren’t likely at HIMSS though) who enjoyed the status quo.

The problem with this battlefield is that they’re battling against a massive shift in reimbursement model. They can try and stay entrenched, but the shift in healthcare business model is going to absolutely force them to change. This is not a question of if, but when. This doesn’t keep these organizations from bombing away as they resist the changes.

If you’re a healthcare startup company entering the battlefield (to continue the analogy), you’re out in the open and absolutely vulnerable. You’re very rarely the target of this major entrenched players, but sometimes you get impacted by collateral damage. As the various organizations throw bombs at each other you have to work hard to avoid getting in their way. This is a tricky challenge.

Even more challenging to these startup companies is they don’t have a way to access many of the entrenched companies so they can work together around a common vision. Most of the startups would love to work with the entrenched healthcare companies, but they don’t even have a way to start the conversation.

The mid size healthcare IT companies are even more interesting. They’ve started to carve a space for them in the battle and many of the entrenched healthcare IT vendors are scared at what this means for them. They’re using every means possible to disrupt the competition. At HIMSS I saw the scars from many of these battles.

Certainly this description is true of many industries. Welcome to economic competition and capitalism. Although, this year at HIMSS I found the battle to be much more intense. In the past couple years meaningful use opened up new territories to be “conquered.” There was enough “land” to go around that companies were often working to capture new territories as opposed to battling their competitors for the same opportunities. That’s why I think we’re in a very different market today versus the past couple years.

The great thing is that in periods of turmoil often comes the most amazing innovations. I believe that’s what we’re going to see over the next couple years. Although, I predict that most of these innovations are going to come from places we don’t expect. It’s just too hard for companies to innovate themselves out of business. There are a few exceptions in history and we might see a few exceptions in healthcare. However, my bet is on the most successful companies being those that choose to obliterate as opposed to automate.

What’s most exciting to me is that healthcare organizations and patients seem to be ready for change. There are varying degrees of readiness, but I believe I’ve seen a groundswell of change that’s coming for healthcare. As a blogger this of course has me excited, but as a patient it has me excited as well.

What were your thoughts of HIMSS 2015? What do you think of the analogy?

While the battle is on in healthcare IT, the best part of HIMSS is always the people. Every industry has some bad apples, but for the most part I’m always deeply impacted by the good nature of so many people I meet at HIMSS. They are sincere in their efforts to try and improve healthcare for good. We certainly have our challenges in healthcare, but similar to what George Bush said in his keynote, I’m optimistic that the good people in healthcare will be able to produce amazing results. The best days of healthcare are not behind us, but are ahead of us.

Some Inspiring and Thought Provoking Ideas from the HIMSS15 Final Keynote

Posted on April 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The last keynote at HIMSS is always inspiring for me. They’ve almost always ended up being one of the more prominent memories for me from HIMSS. This year was no different. I really need to chew on a bunch of what was said still, but Jeremy Gutsche was throwing out nuggets of wisdom throughout his talk. Here are some tweets that show what I mean:

HIMSS15 Social Media and Influencer Thoughts

Posted on April 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think this has been the case the past couple years. The Tuesday of HIMSS seems to always be my day of social media. This year was no different. This was highlighted by a meetup that Shahid Shah and myself did at the HIMSS spot. At first I wasn’t sure if anyone would show for the event. Luckily, 1-2 people were there early and so at least we wouldn’t be talking to ourselves. In fact, Shahid asked for those that weren’t there for the meetup to free up the seats for those that were there for it. Luckily, when I wasn’t watching a whole bunch of people showed up and the event was standing room only. I guess Shahid can really draw a crowd.

What was impressive was the mix of the audience. There was a large group of some of the most influential people in social media (I won’t name names since there were too many and I’ll forget someone), along with a number of newer people. I love that mix and particularly love the new people that are still finding their way. Sometimes they seem a bit like dear in the headlights. That’s ok. That’s part of the fun of learning.

What’s clear to me is that social influencing as really matured for many people, but there are still a lot of people that are trying to figure it out. It’s amazing to see the difference. I’ll be interested to watch this evolve. I still see so much opportunity with it and many aren’t taking advantage of it.

Then, my night was capped off with the New Media Meetup at HIMSS15. This is the 6th year I’ve hosted this event and it seems to get better each year. I’m always humbled by the list of people that register to attend. Plus, I’m extremely appreciative of Stericycle and Patient Prompt that basically through a big party for all these amazing people. It’s always amazing to see the broad spectrum of people that attend and how down to earth they are even given many of their significant social influence. Plus, what an amazing preview for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference.

I didn’t go into many details on what was at the session or who attending the New Media Meetup, but you can get a lot of that information by checking out the #HITMC hashtag. Thanks to all of my new and old social media friends that made today special. I keep learning from you.

I’ll leave this with just one insight that really hit home to me when I shared it in the meetup. Really caring about the people you’re connecting with, the topics you’re sharing and the work you’re doing really comes through in social media. If you’re faking it, people will usually see that. Plus, really caring about those you connect with on social media and the things you share will change your life in really amazing ways.

Reminds me of the wrestler, Jessie Ventura who became governor of Minnesota. One time I heard him say he didn’t have to have a good memory, because he always said what he thought and never told things that were half true. On social media, if you’re faking it, it makes it hard to remember all the things you’ve faked. If you’re authentic and real, it makes it so much easier.

A Few Quick HIMSS15 Thoughts

Posted on April 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s been a long day packed with meetings at HIMSS 2015. I need to reach out to HIMSS to get the final numbers, but word is that there are over 40,000 people at the show. In the hallways, the exhibit hall and the taxi lines it definitely seems to be the case. I’m not sure the jump in attendees, but I saw one tweet that IBM had 400 people there. Don’t quote me on it since I can’t find the tweet, but that’s just extraordinary to even consider that many people from one company.

Of course, the reason I can’t find the tweet is that the Twitter stream has been setting new records each day. The HIMSS 2015 Twitter Tips and Tricks is valuable if you want to get value out of the #HIMSS15 Twitter stream. I also have to admit that I might be going a bit overboard on the selfies. I think I’ve got the @mandibpro selfie disease. Not sure the treatment for it since my doctor doesn’t do a telemedicine visit while I’m in Chicago.

I’ve had some amazing meetings that will inform my blog posts for weeks to come. However, my biggest takeaway from the first official day of HIMSS is that change is in the air. The forces are at work to make interoperability a reality. It’s going to be a massive civil war as the various competing parties battle it out as they set the pathway forward.

You might think that this is a bit of an exaggeration, but I think it’s pretty close to what’s happening. What’s not clear to me is whose going to win and what the final outcome will look like. There are so many competing interests that are trying to get at the data and make it valuable for the doctor and health system.

Along those lines, I’m absolutely fascinated by the real time analytics capabilities that I saw being built. A number of companies I talked to are moving beyond the standard batch loaded enterprise data warehouse approach to a real time (or as one vendor said…we all have to call it near real time) stream of data. I think this is going to drive a massive change in innovation.

I’ll be talking more about the various vendors I saw and their approaches to this in future posts after HIMSS. While I’m excited by some of the many things these companies are doing, I still feel like many of them are constrained by their inability to get to the data. A number of them were working on such small data sets. This was largely because they can’t get the other data. One vendor told me that their biggest challenge is getting an organization to turn over their data for them for analysis.

While it’s important that organizations are extremely careful with how they handle and share their data. More organizations should be working with trusted partners in order to extract more value out of the data and to more importantly make new discoveries. The discoveries we’re making today are really great, but I can only imagine how much more we could accomplish with more data to inform those discoveries.

Healthcare Scene #HIMSS15 Guide

Posted on April 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you read this and any of the other Healthcare Scene blogs or follow us on social media, you know that #HIMSSSanity is upon us. Yes, it’s the Thursday before the big HIMSS Annual conference in Chicago.

I’ve often described my visits to the HIMSS annual conference like a kid in a candy store. As a blogger the model is pretty simple. I need: content, readers, and advertisers. Everywhere I look at HIMSS you can find potentially all three of those things. That’s why I’ll be there all week enjoying time meeting with lots of really interesting people and companies.

My HIMSS schedule is packed with meetings. I think when all is said and done I’ll have about 30 must attend meetings and hundreds of casual meetings and networking with people. I always love meeting readers in person at HIMSS, so please find me and come say hi. Luckily, in our HIMSS 2015 guide we have a number of options where you can find me. Plus, I’m listing a number of other talks/sessions/features at HIMSS that have caught my eye. Here we go:

HIMSS Opening Reception
I’ve had mixed experiences at the HIMSS opening reception. I usually like to check it out and see what HIMSS has done. Plus, it’s a great place to meet random people. One challenge I have with social media is that it now facilitates me meeting a lot of the same people. That’s a great thing, but does sometimes limit meeting new people. I love the HIMSS Speakeasy theme for the opening reception. I heard that the live music will make for the perfect #HIMSS15DanceOff setting.

iPatientCare
If you’re interested in “What comes after MU? Real digital attention to your patients” then you’re going to want to join Shahid Shah at the iPatientCare Booth #2941 on Monday 4/13 at 2:30 PM CT. They’ll be discussing the questions: What are you doing to manage chronic care in your organization? Is your approach to interoperability bad for patients? What are you doing to manage chronic care in your organization? Changing reimbursement is going to require true patient engagement (not just MU required engagement). In this talk at the iPatientCare booth, Shahid will dive deep into what true patient engagement looks like.

Social Media and Influence Meetup
This meetup will be hosted by myself and my partner Shahid Shah at the HIMSS Spot (North Hall – B Lobby) on Tuesday 4/14 at 12:30 CT. This will be one of the best places to come and find me. Plus, we always have a great crowd and an even better discussion with those that attend. In some ways this will be a small preview into the larger 2 day healthcare IT marketing and PR conference. We hope to see lots of the #HITMC community there.

SAP Healthcare
The famous Shahid Shah together with Dr. David Delaney, SAP’s CMO, will be leading a great discussion at SAP Booth #2656 on Tuesday 4/14 at 2PM CT. The discussion will be around the topic “Driving Clinical Value and ROI Out of Your Data” and will cover questions like: Is data really generating clinical value? Is anyone really driving clinical value from data? Do we have the resources we need to generate ROI from our healthcare data? These are some really important questions for healthcare and I’m sure the discussion will be great.

New Media Meetup Sponsored by Stericycle
We posted about the New Media Meetup before and so hopefully you’ve registered to attend. If you haven’t, there are only a very few number of slots left and then we’re at capacity. This really is a who’s who of healthcare IT social media influencers. I’m proud to host the event and have loved working with Stericycle and Patient Prompt to plan it. We’ve got a lot of fun things and great giveaways planned for the event. Can’t wait to see everyone there.

Vocera
Vocera has a whole schedule of talks to choose from. The one by Rhonda Collins, CNO at Vocera called “Navigate the Storm without Creating Your Own Twister” caught my eye. I think we can all relate to the storm of healthcare IT priorities and challenges. Although, the Sue Murphy, Exec. Dir. of Patient Experience & Engagement at University of Chicago Medicine, session on Transforming Patient Experience Using Care Rounding also looks interesting.

#iHeartHIT Meetup
I really wanted to make this meetup, but it looks like I’m booked other places. Doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it. I believe the HIMSS social media ambassadors will be there. Luckily, I think I’ll see them at some of the other events. It also means that it will likely generate a lot of tweets so I can kind of experience the event later.

#HITsm at #HIMSS15
This year, #HITsm is mixing it up with their meetup. They’re basically having a panel discussion with Keith Boone, Rasu Shrestha, MD, David Muntz, and Douglas Fridsma, MD. I believe that Mandi Bishop is moderating. Seems like the topic du jour is going to be interoperability given the panelists. Should be a great panel for that topic. I’ll be the heckler in the back or maybe I’ll just save my heckling for Twitter.

Bush Keynote
The keynotes this year are pretty disappointing for me. I think Bush’s keynote will likely be the most interesting. Although, I always love hearing people like Jeremy Gutsche as well. Of course, I think you’re crazy to actually attend the keynote. Why do I want to watch a little small person up on stage? I’ll be watching the keynotes from the comfort of the press room (plus, they have internet and power).

HIMSS Block Party – This is similar to the opening reception. The block party idea is pretty cool. I’m quite sure you’ll find me in the Little Italy area. #ItalianFoodAddict

HX360
I’m always intrigued by the unique tracks that HIMSS puts together. This year it’s called HX360. This consists of a bunch of programming and also a section of the exhibit hall. Looking at what this area has to offer gives you a good idea of what HIMSS is thinking about the future of healthcare IT.

So many more things could be listed like the CHIME Fall Forum at HIMSS15 on Saturday and Sunday. Of course, there are a lot of evening events including the popular Encore/Next Wave Connect Pub Nights, athenahealth Cloud Party, HIStalkapalooza, Anthelio Casino Night, Divurgent’s summHIT, and AEGIS Odyssey (yes, it’s a massively beautiful yacht) to just name a few.

I personally fly in on Saturday and out on Friday. I’m still looking for something great to do on Wednesday and Thursday evening. If some people are going to be there Wednesday and Thursday evening, maybe we could do something fun together. I’d love to hear people’s ideas if you’re around.

The Future Of…Patient Engagement

Posted on March 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Healthcare has a major challenge when it comes to the term “Patient Engagement.” $36 billion of government money and something called meaningful use has corrupted the word Patient Engagement. While meaningful use requires “5% patient engagement”, that’s a far cry from actually engaging with patients. Anyone that’s attested to meaningful use knows what I mean.

As we move past meaningful use, what then will patient engagement actually look like?

When I start to think about the future of patient engagement, I’m taken back to my experience with a new primary care provider that’s trying to Restore Humanity to Healthcare (see Restore Humanity to Healthcare part 2 as well). In this case, I’m exploring the idea of unlimited primary care along with a primary care team that includes a doctor, but also includes a wellness coordinator that’s interested in my wellness and not just my presenting problem.

Once you take the payment portion out of primary care, it dramatically changes the equation for me. Gone are the fears of going to the doctor because you don’t want to pay the co-pay. Gone are the days where a doctor needs to see you in the office in order to be able to make money from the visit. With unlimited primary care, an email, phone call or text message that solves the problem is a great solution for the doctor and the patient.

Of course, this model of primary care is only one example of the shift that’s going to drive us to patient engagement. ACOs and value based care models are going to require a much deeper relationship between doctors and patients. Trust me that 5% patient engagement through an online portal isn’t going to be enough in these new models.

Plus, these new models are going to really convert our current sick care system into a true healthcare system. I like to call this new model “Treating Healthy Patients.” Quite frankly we’re not ready for this change right now, but in the future we’ll have to adapt. The biggest change is going to be in how we define “patient” and “healthy.”

The wave of connected medical devices and innovation are going to completely reframe how we look at health. Instead of describing ourselves as healthy, the data will tell us that we’re all sick. We’re just at different points in the continuum of sickness.

In the future, patient engagement will be the key to treating each of us individually. The symptoms will change from coughing and vomiting to 85% risk for diabetes and 76% risk for a heart attack. We thought we had patient compliance issues when someone is coughing and vomiting (ie. something they want to fix). Now imagine patient compliance challenges when the patient isn’t feeling any pain, but they need to change something in order to avoid some major health problem.

I think this describes perfectly why we’re entering one of the most challenging times in healthcare. It’s a dramatic shift in how we think about healthcare and has a new set of more challenging problems that we’ve never solved. One of the keys to solving these new challenges is patient engagement.

The Future Of…Healthcare Innovation

Posted on March 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Innovation is a fascinating concept. Historians and philosophers have been thinking and investigating the key to innovation forever. I’m not sure anyone has ever found the true secret sauce to innovation. Every innovation I’ve ever seen has been a mix of timing, luck, and hard work.

Some times the timing is not right for a product and therefore it fails. The product might have been great, but the timing wasn’t right for it to be rolled out. Innovation always requires a little luck. Maybe it was the chance meeting with an investor that helps take and idea to the next level. Maybe it’s the luck of getting the right exposure that catapults your idea into a business. Maybe it’s the luck of the right initial end users which shape the direction of the product. Every innovation has also required hard work. In fact, the key to ensuring you’re ready for luck to be heaped upon you or to test if your timing is right is to put in the work.

The great thing is that it’s a brilliant time to be working on innovations in healthcare. We’re currently at the beginning of a confluence of healthcare innovations. Each one on its own might seem like a rather small innovation, but taken together they’re going to provide amazing healthcare innovations that shape the future of healthcare as we know it.

Let me give a few examples of the wave of innovations that are happening. Health sensors are exploding. Are ability to know in real time how well our body is performing is off the charts. There are sensors out there for just about every measurable aspect of the human body. The next innovation will be to take all this sensor data and collapse it down into appropriate communication and actions.

Another example, is the innovations in genomic medicine. The cost and speed required to map your genome is collapsing faster than Moore’s law. All of that genomic data is going to be available to innovators who want to build something on top of it.

3D printing is progressing at light speed. Don’t think this applies to healthcare? Check out this 3D printed prosthetic hand or this 3D printed heart. If you really want your mind blown, check out people’s work to provide blood to 3D printed organs.

If you think we’ve gotten value out of healthcare data, you’re kidding yourself. There are so many innovations in healthcare data that are sitting there waiting in healthcare data hoards. We just need to tap into that data and start sharing those findings with a connected healthcare system.

The mobile device is an incredible innovation just waiting for healthcare. We are all essentially walking around with a computer in our pocket now. We’ve already started to see the innovations this will provide healthcare, but it’s only just the beginning. This computer in our pocket will become the brain and communication hub for our healthcare needs.

I’m sure you can think of other innovations that I haven’t mentioned including robotics, health literacy, healthcare gaming, etc. What’s most exciting to me about the future of healthcare innovation is that each of these innovations will combine into a unforeseen innovation. The most powerful innovations in healthcare will not be a single innovative idea. Instead, it will come from someone who combines multiple innovations into one beautiful package.

The most exciting part of innovation is that it’s usually unexpected and surprising. I love surprises. What do you see as the future building blocks of innovation in healthcare?

6th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2015 Sponsored by Stericycle

Posted on March 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you planning to attend the HIMSS 2015 conference in Chicago, I’m excited to share the details of the 6th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS. For those who’ve missed the last 5 events, it’s the premiere coming together of healthcare IT bloggers, tweeters, and other social media influencers at the mecca of Healthcare IT conferences.

We’ve secured a great venue for the event that’s a perfect match for Chicago and social media. We know that many of you will be looking to satisfy your need for deep dish pizza while in Chicago and so we’re happy to solve that problem for you. Plus, along with some great food and drinks, we know you’ll love connecting and taking selfies with all the healthcare IT social media rockstars that will be in attendance.

A sincere thanks to Stericycle and one of their products, Patient Prompt, for sponsoring the New Media Meeetup and making it possible for those of us in New Media to enjoy a wonderful evening of food and drink together at HIMSS. I hope everyone will check out Stericycle and thank them for sponsoring the event.

Also, those interested in this event will want to check out the full scale Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference that we’re hosting in Las Vegas May 7-8, 2015. It’s a special 2 days devoted to health IT marketing and PR professionals.

Now for the details of the New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2015:

Register Here!

When: Tuesday 4/14 6:00-8:00 PM
Where: Gino’s East – 162 E Superior Street, Chicago, IL 60611 MAP
Who: Anyone who uses or is interested in New Media (Blogs, Twitter, Social Media, etc)
What: Food, Drinks, and Amazing People

Note: We have limited space for the event and so like in past years, we’ll have to close registration once we reach capacity.

Sponsored by Stericycle
Stericycle-1ColorSmall_2015
Stericycle help hospitals and providers acquire and retain patients through outsourced contact center services.

Our focus includes expanding patient access with one call resolution 24/7, identifying providers, scheduling appointments and helping consumers and patients to stay engaged in the health system while also meeting revenue objectives.

We also specialize in patient satisfaction and care compliance, including follow-up solutions after receiving care from physician, hospital, ED or other service provider. Learn more at www.stericyclecommunications.com

Sponsored by Patient Prompt
Patient Prompt
PatientPrompt is a cloud-based communications platform that delivers messages via email, voice and text. Through direct, real-time synchronization with over 100 EHR and Practice Management Systems, the platform can construct highly customized notifications based on the system data, a patient’s preferences and an organization’s needs. Learn more at patientprompt.com

A really big thank you also goes out to all the members of Influential Networks and Healthcare Scene that help promote the New Media Meetup. This event was originally brought together through social media and still today is organized using social media.

Let me know if you have any questions and I look forward to seeing many of you in Chicago very soon!

The Future Of…Healthcare Security

Posted on March 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Security is on the top of mind of most healthcare boards. I think the instruction from these boards to CIOs is simple: Keep Us Out of the News!

That’s an order that’s much easier said than done. If Google and Anthem can’t stay out of the news because of a breach, then a hospital or doctor’s office is fighting an uphill battle. Still don’t believe me, check out this visualization of internet attacks. It’s pretty scary stuff.

The reality is that you don’t really win a security battle. You can just defend against attacks as well as possible with the limited resources you have available. What is clear is that while still limited, healthcare will be investing more resources in security and privacy than they’ve ever done before.

The future of effective security in healthcare is going to be organizations who bake security into everything they do. Instead of hiring a chief security officer that worries about and advocates for security, we need a culture of security in healthcare organizations. This starts at the top where the leader is always asking about how we’re addressing security. That leadership will then trickle down into the culture of a company.

Let’s also be clear that security doesn’t have to be at odds with innovation and technology. In fact, technology can take our approach to security and privacy to the next level. Tell me how you knew who read the chart in a paper chart world? Oh yes, that sign out sheet that people always forgot to sign. Oh wait, the fingerprints on the chart were checked. It’s almost ludicrous to think about. Let’s be real. In the paper chart world we put in processes to try to avoid the wrong people getting their hands on the chart, but we really had no idea who saw it. The opposite is true in an EHR world. We know exactly who saw what and who changed what and when and where (Note: Some EHR are better than others at this, but a few lawsuits will get them all up to par on it).

The reality is that technology can take security and privacy to another level that we could have never dreamed. We can implement granular access controls that are hard and fast and monitored and audited. That’s a powerful part of the future of security and privacy in healthcare. Remember that many of the healthcare breaches come from people who have a username and password and not from some outside hacker.

A culture of security and privacy embraces the ability to track when and what happens to every piece of PHI in their organization. Plus, this culture has to be built into the procurement process, the implementation process, the training process, etc. Gone are the days of the chief security officer scapegoat. Technology is going to show very clearly who is responsible.

While I’ve described a rosy future built around a culture of privacy and security, I’m not naive. The future of healthcare security also includes a large number of organizations who continue to live a security life of “ignorance is bliss.” These people will pay lip service to privacy and security, but won’t actually address the culture change that’s needed to address privacy and security. They’ll continue the “Just Enough Culture of HIPAA Compliance.”

In the future we’ll have to be careful to not include one organization’s ignorance in a broad description of healthcare in general. A great example of this can be learned from the Sutter Health breach. In this incident, Sutter Health CPMC found the breach during a proactive audit of their EHR. Here’s the lesson learned from that breach:

The other lesson we need to take from this HIPAA breach notification is that we shouldn’t be so quick to judge an organization that proactively discovers a breach. If we’re too punitive with healthcare organizations that find and effectively address a breach like this, then organizations will stop finding and reporting these issues. We should want healthcare organizations that have a culture and privacy and security. Part of that culture is that they’re going to sometimes catch bad actors which they need to correct.

Healthcare IT software like EHRs have a great ability to track everything that’s done and they’re only going to get better at doing it. That’s a good thing and healthcare information security and privacy will benefit from it. We should encourage rather than ridicule organizations like CPMC for their proactive efforts to take care of the privacy of their patients’ information. I hope we see more organizations like Sutter Health who take a proactive approach to the security and privacy of healthcare information.

In fact the title of the blog post linked above is a warning for the future of healthcare IT: “Will Hospitals Be At Risk for HIPAA Audits If They Don’t Have HIPAA Violations?”

Security and privacy will be part of the fabric of everything we do in healthcare IT. We can’t ignore them. In order for patients to trust these healthcare apps, security will have to be a feature. Those in healthcare IT that don’t include security as a feature will be on shaky ground.