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Meaning of KLAS Results

Posted on June 18, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve had this post in the hopper since HIMSS back in early March. Unfortunately, it got lost in my other 200 or so draft posts that I work from for future posts. We’ll see if people think I should have left the idea in my drafts or not.

During one my meetings with EMR vendors I discussed the value of KLAS and why this EMR vendor was so HIGH on CCHIT (they’re booth had it plastered all over) and why they chose not to have KLAS ratings plastered beside their CCHIT marketing plan. This really smart EMR vendor marketing manager had previously described the marketing value (note that I didn’t say technical or clinical value) of having the CCHIT certification. So, why not KLAS?

This EMR vendor had obviously done their homework and had considered getting the KLAS rating. The reason they didn’t go that direction was he asked an interesting question of KLAS. He wanted to know how many people actually went to KLAS and downloaded the ratings from their website. Obviously, if they had hundreds of thousands of doctors downloading the ratings from their website, then it could be a great marketing tool for the EMR vendor to sell more product.

Turns out only 5000 people actually downloaded the KLAS ratings. When you add in the EMR vendors and other people who don’t purchase an EMR, that’s such a small footprint. I’ll admit that I’ve seen the KLAS name around a lot of places, but I’ve seen it less and less lately. Does anyone care about KLAS anymore? I’m going to Utah later this month. Maybe I should stop in and say Hi. Seems like there’s such an opportunity in the EMR space right now and they might be missing out.

HIMSS Public Policy Forum Quick Hits

Posted on April 5, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yes, I still have quite a bit of HIMSS content that I haven’t had a chance to post. Luckily most of the information is really timeless and so it doesn’t matter when it’s posted. One of those was some of the information I got at the public policy forum at HIMSS. Here’s some quick hits from it:

Dr. Rhonda Medows from Georgia said, “Could extend benefits to Long Term care based on capital improvement benefits.” I wonder if she’ll still do this if it’s true that there will be some money for long term care in the current healthcare reform. At least Georgia was looking at some creative ways to get some money for healthcare IT in under served areas.

State representative Rosenthall from NH-Representative said that 40-50 percent of doctors in NH have some access to EMR. She also said that 900 out of 4500 have ePrescribing (20 percent).

Probably the most interesting thing Representative Rosenthall said was in response to my question about how NH (a small state) would fund a state HIE. She quickly and frankly responded that their state must do a private partnership since the state won’t have the money in their small tax base to be able to fund the HIE. I’m guessing that many states will be in this same position.

Finally, I think it was one of the HIMSS public policy people (sorry I don’t remember which one) made an interesting comment about the government’s approach to funding the state HIE efforts. They described that the “seed funding” for HIE that’s been given to states is almost like a hope that they’ll figure out some sustainable creative revenue model and not just disappear the way RHIO have.

I remember the hype that surrounded even the term RHIO about 4 years ago and no one speaks of them anymore. It’s a really serious question to ask if HIE’s are going to find that “creative revenue model” that has alluded health information exchange in the past. I’d love to hear from people about what the most promising HIE revenue models are right now.

Discussion About EMR Study by Accenture

Posted on April 1, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the first people I talked with when I arrived at HIMSS was a meeting with Dr. Greg Parston from Accenture. Dr. Parston has an interesting job at Accenture since it seems like he gets paid to just study interesting topics. Not a bad gig.

Well, it turns out that Accenture and Dr. Parston had been working on a few studies related to EMR (imagine that). So, we had a really interesting discussion about the findings of their survey and Dr. Parston even made some predictions about the future of the EMR market. The following are some of the takeaways I thought were interesting from our discussion:

First some details about the survey. It was a survey of 1000 doctors done in December of 2009 from all over the country. They showed a 15% percent adoption rate for EMR, or basically in line with most of the other projections of EMR adoption.

The study then took a look at the next 24 months and these doctors plans for that time period. They found that 60% intend to purchase an EMR system in the next 24 months. However, if you look at just those doctors that were under 55, the number intending to purchase an EMR is 80 percent.

A few other interesting things about their motivations and size. They found that the stimulus money was the number 1 factor for wanting to implement an EMR. I guess this isn’t surprising, but it’s unfortunate. Sure seems like a hard thing to reconcile when I think that most doctors want to use technology to become more efficient. Yet, there number one motivation (EMR Stimulus money) does nothing to improve productivity. An EMR might increase your productivity, but “meaningful use” and “certified EHR” don’t help with that.

Dr. Parston also mentioned that doctors want to control their data. Imagine that! Sorry hospitals and SaaS EMR (except for those SaaS EMR that give doctors their data, I’m not talking to you).

The most interesting part of our conversation was that Dr. Parston projected that there would be 70 percent EHR adoption in 3 years. I posted that to twitter right after he said it to a mixed response with more people saying that won’t happen. What do you think about this? That’s a pretty lofty projection if you ask me. I’ll be surprised if we top 50% EHR adoption in 3 years.

Finally, Dr. Parston also mentioned that in one of his EMR studies they found that 70 of Americans said it was very important or important for a doctor to have EMR. This number kind of bothers me, because I just don’t see this same patient demand for doctors to use an EMR. You may remember that I’ve written a few times about EMR adoption waiting for consumer demand for EMR. So, I think this will happen at some point. I just don’t think we’re there yet.

HIMSS 2010 Attendance Numbers

Posted on March 21, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I always find the attendance numbers for a conference interesting. Ok, I pretty much find any statistics interesting. Just ask me about the statistics for my various websites and I can tell you them up and down. I’m a stats addict.

So, it seems fitting that I share the HIMSS attendance stats:
Registration: 27,855, compared to 27,627 at HIMSS09, healthcare industry experts learning about the latest solutions for improving healthcare through IT.

  • Professional registration outpaced 2009 by 8.5% with 13,846, compared to 12,766 in 2009, registrants in this category
  • Nearly 30% of those registering come from healthcare provider settings
  • 11% of registrants are CIO and CTOs; nearly 10% are CEOs
  • Almost 8% are from countries outside of the United States

Here’s a nice graph of the numbers comparing HIMSS 2009 and HIMSS 2010:

HIMSS10 HIMSS 10 HIMSS 09
Total registration 27,855 27,627
Professional registration 13,846 12,766
Exhibiting companies 934 907
Number of new exhibitors 289 256
Square feet for exhibits 391,560 375,840
HIMSS10 Interoperability Showcase HIMSS10 HIMSS09
Total Participants 84 72
Number of unique systems 96 60

It really is quite amazing that the attendance at this conference was up despite this current economic recessions we’re experiencing. I guess government money will bring people out of the wood works.

I wish that they would have shared percentage of clinical staff that attended. Yes, I’m talking about doctors, nurses, practice managers, etc. I actually saw quite a few in the sessions that were targeted at them. However, those sessions were generally poorly attended compared to many of the other sessions about policy or stimulus money.

Also, if you look at the CEO, CIO and CTO’s that attended the percentages break out to about 6000 people. I wish I knew how many CEO, CIO and CTO’s there are in the healthcare space so I knew if 6000 was a large percentage or small. I also wish they would have broken out the CEO, CIO and CTO’s and told us how many hospital ones were at the show. I could have easily put down CEO of EMR and HIPAA, but that’s not the same as the CEO of a hospital. I think I know which one is better.

Video Interview of Evan Steele, CEO of SRSsoft EMR

Posted on March 18, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I must admit that one person that I was very excited to meet at HIMSS was Evan Steele, the CEO of SRSsoft. Evan and I had interacted a number of times online. Plus, I love an EMR vendor CEO that has a blog. Not just any blog, but one that broadens the discussion about EMR software and provides an alternate view to EMR adoption.

Turns out that many people at HIMSS don’t like the hybrid EMR style of software that Evan Steele and SRSsoft are trying to create. There is certainly an argument to be made against it, but personally I like to see people approaching the challenge of clinical documentation in different ways. I also love how SRSsoft focuses so much effort and energy on the physician. If more EMR vendors had this focused, we’d have much better EMR software.

Now this kind of sounds like a sales pitch for SRSsoft. It’s not. SRSsoft has its flaws and weakness like every other EMR software out there. I do think that they’ve done a good job broadening the discussion so I knew for sure that I had to talk with Evan Steele on video. In this video, he makes a really interesting point about CCHIT certification, now HHS certification, the new ICD 10, etc all working to make many EMR vendor’s software clunky (my word, not his).

Enough talk, check out my interview with Evan Steele, CEO of SRSsoft.

I should also mention that Evan and I were on a Meet the Bloggers panel together. That was a good time too.

Video Interview About Verizon’s HIE

Posted on March 15, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Well, as you might have noticed, I decided to take the weekend off from the blog. I figured it was reasonable to take a weekend off after the craziness of HIMSS. I still have a ton of content from HIMSS 10 that I’d like to post. So, watch for more of that over the next couple weeks as well.

I thought a nice video to kick off the new week would be nice. This video is of Robin Daigh from MD-IT and Craig Mercure from MxSecure talking about their partnership with Verizon to create a really interesting health information exchange. I talked about this Medical Transcription Service Consortium previously, but it was really neat to talk about it in person with Robin and Craig (Full Disclosure: Both Robin and Craig advertise on EMR and HIPAA). I also talked with the CMO from Verizon about it and so more details on that to come later.

For now, enjoy what I think is an interesting play in the HIE space to bring together all the transcription companies and now anyone who wants to participate and start sharing clinical data.


This video coverage of HIMSS 10 sponsored by Practice Fusion and their Free EMR.

Video of Dock and Lock System at HIMSS

Posted on March 12, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I first came across these laptop carts when I first started working in healthcare about 5 years ago. Basically, we wanted somewhere we could store the laptops that was safe and that it could still be charging over night. So of course I wasn’t that interested in these carts when I passed by their booth at HIMSS. However, their hershey’s chocolate bar (full size in fact) drew me in. Then, I found out about the “brains” that are built into these carts now and I thought that others might be interested in it also. Pretty innovative.

This video coverage of HIMSS 10 sponsored by Practice Fusion and their Free EMR.

Pervasive’s Revenue Cycle Management Solution Video at HIMSS

Posted on March 11, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For one of the New Media Meetups at HIMSS we met at the Pervasive booth on the exhibitor floor. I must admit that I wasn’t quite sure what I’d find at the Pervasive booth, but I’d had a few interactions with the people behind the company and so I was excited to meet them in person.

Turns out when I first got there I was told about how Pervasive was taking the data stuck in EMR software or other healthcare software and was helping revenue cycle management companies extract that data out. I thought what they were doing was pretty interesting and so I caught this video explaining a little bit more about Pervasive:

This video coverage of HIMSS 10 sponsored by Practice Fusion and their Free EMR.

Video of MModal at HIMSS

Posted on March 10, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On more than one occasion I’ve talked with people about the work the people at MModal are doing in the healthcare IT space. I think they’re a really interesting technology that could save all those doctors that want to still dictate their notes. MModal offers an interesting solution for preserving the valuable story that a narrative tells while also pulling out the key data elements into granular, reportable pieces.

I don’t think I need to say much more about MModal. Just watch this video interview I did with them at HIMSS 10:

This video coverage of HIMSS 10 sponsored by Practice Fusion and their Free EMR.

EMR ROI Session at HIMSS

Posted on March 9, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On Thursday at HIMSS I attended a session called “Implementing and Measuring EMR ROI in the Specialty Practice” by Peter M. Deane, MD. This was the second such session that I attended. I was and am really interested in how practices are measuring the ROI in their clinic.

I found this second session really interesting since Dr. Deane talked about the benefits he received from his EMR and yet, he still wasn’t doing his clinical notes electronically. Yes, it felt a little bit wrong to say that he uses an EMR when he isn’t writing his clinical notes electronically yet. However, what I found really interesting was that he was starting to see a whole laundry lists of benefits from his EMR even though he was only partially implemented.

Honestly, I think that understanding the real benefits of an EMR in your practice is one of the keys to selecting and implementing an EMR. In fact, that’s why I have a whole section talking about the guaranteed, possible and dubious benefits of an EMR implementation in my just released EMR selection book.

Back to the session, Dr. Deane had an interesting point about paper charts. In his slide it said, “Documentation is easy–to do poorly.” This is an interesting point, because I’ve found that EMR doesn’t necessarily take a doctor who is poor at documenting and make them better. However, what an EMR does do is hold people more accountable for what their documenting.

Another key point that was offered in this session was in regards to the EMR selection process, “Decide: None is perfect, nor will the vendors ever by ‘ready’ for some.” I couldn’t agree more. Setting reasonable expectations is key to any successful EMR implementation. Go in with unreasonable expectations and you’re doomed for failure. That doesn’t mean you can’t be ambitious, but you can be reasonable at the same time.

I also loved how Dr. Deane talked about the different types of leadership models in practices. He called them: “Command and control model (large institutional or central tyranny-style practices)” or “Consensus model (fraternity-style practice).” Understanding this dynamic is really important as you work to gain buy in for your EMR implementation.

Another interesting insight he made was that people Fear Change. Ok, that’s not new. However, he clarified that “change means extra work” and “they also fear being left behind.” This is interesting advice during an EMR implementation. I guess the point being that pace of an EMR implementation matters.

Dr. Deane also talked about the value of your EMR vendor customizing the EMR for you. I’ve seen the value of this first hand. It really does empower staff for your EMR vendor to do something for your office. Plus, it’s a real benefit to be able to point to those changes as your EMR progresses. Remember that EMR is a journey and not a one time event.

Here’s a list of other EMR benefits he highlighted:
-3 clerical positions ($70k per year)
-Supplies and less printing ($3,500 per year)
-Enhanced Reimbursement
-Faster A/R turnover time
-PQRI Incentives

Not a bad session. Too bad it was on Thursday just before the closing keynote, so many at HIMSS had already gone home. Lucky for you, I stayed and could summarize it for you here;-)