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The Easiest Form of Healthcare Information Blocking – Charge for It

Posted on March 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve watched the discussion around information blocking in healthcare with a lot of interest. I’ve seen many people (including the government) talk about how information blocking is a major issue in healthcare and that we need to do something to solve the problem of information blocking. I’ve read other organizations who have searched for information blocking and say they can’t find it and that people are overstating the issue of information blocking.

I do think that some people overstate how big of an issue information blocking is, but I know that it’s a problem. Sometimes the information blocking is done purposefully, but other times it’s happening without much thought as to why they should or shouldn’t take part in information sharing.

As I’ve watched this discussion evolve and the drive towards interoperability I’ve realized that what’s happening in interoperability today could very well be the easiest and most legal form of information blocking that exists: charge for the information.

When I look into the future of information sharing, I can see EHR vendors salivating at these new found revenue streams associated with data sharing. Sure, it will only be pennies or fractions of a penny to share each record. However, when you spread that across millions and millions of records those fractions of a penny really start to add up.

When I look at the interoperability options that are being built today, these options are going to be able to charge for access to this data in a very granular way. All the data sharing is easily tracked and if it’s being tracked it can easily be charged for. I expect large healthcare organizations are going to have to start creating entire budgets dedicated to the cost of interoperability.

Once this happens smaller healthcare organizations are going to be blocked out of accessing the data. However, they won’t be literally blocked out of accessing the data like they are now. Instead, they’ll have access to the data, but the cost to access the data will be so much that they’ll be unable to access the data due to the high costs.

If you’re someone who’s a fan of information blocking, this is the perfect solution. No one can tell you that they couldn’t get access to the data, because they could get access to the data. All they had to do was pay for it. The fact that they couldn’t afford to access the data is a different issue. I expect this day will come sooner than we think.

Meaningful Use Is Going to Be Replaced – #JPM16

Posted on January 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Big news came out today during the JP Morgan annual healthcare conference in San Francisco. Andy Slavitt, acting administrator of CMS, live tweeted his own talk at the event including this bombshell:


Technically meaningful use is not quite over, but it’s heading that way. We always read about lame duck head coaches in sports. I guess this is the version of a lame duck government program? Of course, this is just coming from the acting administrator of CMS. It’s not yet law. So, all those working on meaningful use reports, keep working.

The end of meaningful use as we know it will be generally welcome news to most in healthcare. Although, I’m sure that most will also take it with a grain of salt. Many in healthcare likely worry that the “something better” that replaces meaningful use and MACRA will actually be something worse. The cynics might argue that nothing could be worse, but I’ve never seen the government back down from that challenge.

What interests me is what levers they have available to them to be able to make changes. Can they do it without congressional action? Are doctors angry enough that congress will take action? What will happen to the remaining $10-20 billion allocated to meaningful use? What will hospitals and doctors that were counting on the meaningful use money do? Will they not get it anymore or will it be available in a new program? Obviously, there are more questions than answers at this point.

All in all, I’m glad to hear that Andy Slavitt is open to change. I suggested they blow up meaningful use a couple years ago.

Andy also did a tweetstorm to outline the 4 themes for reforming the MACRA and post-MU tech program:

These all seem surprisingly reasonable and mirror many of the comments I hear from doctors. However, the challenge is always in the implementation of these ideas. Some of them are very hard to track and reward. I can’t argue with the principles though. They highlight some of the major challenges associated with healthcare tech. It’s going to take some time to infuse entrepreneurship instead of regulation back into the EHR world, but these guidelines are a good step towards that effort.

UPDATE: Here’s the full text of Andy Slavitt’s talk at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference.