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Health IT Continues To Drive Healthcare Leaders’ Agenda

Posted on October 23, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study laying out opportunities, challenges and issues in healthcare likely to emerge in 2018 demonstrates that health IT is very much top of mind for healthcare leaders.

The 2018 HCEG Top 10 list, which is published by the Healthcare Executive Group, was created based on feedback from executives at its 2017 Annual Forum in Nashville, TN. Participants included health plans, health systems and provider organizations.

The top item on the list was “Clinical and Data Analytics,” which the list describes as leveraging big data with clinical evidence to segment populations, manage health and drive decisions. The second-place slot was occupied by “Population Health Services Organizations,” which, it says, operationalize population health strategy and chronic care management, drive clinical innovation and integrate social determinants of health.

The list also included “Harnessing Mobile Health Technology,” which included improving disease management and member engagement in data collection/distribution; “The Engaged Digital Consumer,” which by its definition includes HSAs, member/patient portals and health and wellness education materials; and cybersecurity.

Other hot issues named by the group include value-based payments, cost transparency, total consumer health, healthcare reform and addressing pharmacy costs.

So, readers, do you agree with HCEG’s priorities? Has the list left off any important topics?

In my case, I’d probably add a few items to list. For example, I may be getting ahead of the industry, but I’d argue that healthcare AI-related technologies might belong there. While there’s a whole separate article to be written here, in short, I believe that both AI-driven data analytics and consumer-facing technologies like medical chatbots have tremendous potential.

Also, I was surprised to see that care coordination improvements didn’t top respondents’ list of concerns. Admittedly, some of the list items might involve taking coordination to the next level, but the executives apparently didn’t identify it as a top priority.

Finally, as unsexy as the topic is for most, I would have thought that some form of health IT infrastructure spending or broader IT investment concerns might rise to the top of this list. Even if these executives didn’t discuss it, my sense from looking at multiple information sources is that providers are, and will continue to be, hard-pressed to allocate enough funds for IT.

Of course, if the executives involved can address even a few of their existing top 10 items next year, they’ll be doing pretty well. For example, we all know that providers‘ ability to manage value-based contracting is minimal in many cases, so making progress would be worthwhile. Participants like hospitals and clinics still need time to get their act together on value-based care, and many are unlikely to be on top of things by 2018.

There are also problems, like population health management, which involve processes rather than a destination. Providers will be struggling to address it well beyond 2018. That being said, it’d be great if healthcare execs could improve their results next year.

Nit-picking aside, HCEG’s Top 10 list is largely dead-on. The question is whether will be able to step up and address all of these things. Fingers crossed!

#TransformHIT Think Tank Hosted by DellEMC

Posted on April 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


DellEMC has once again invited me back to participate at the 6th annual #TransformHIT Healthcare Think Tank event happening Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from Noon ET (9 AM PT) – 3 PM ET (Noon PT). I think I’ve been lucky enough to participate 5 of the 6 years and I’ve really enjoyed every one of them. DellEMC does a great job bringing together really smart, interesting people and encourages a sincere, open discussion of major healthcare IT topics. Plus, they do a great job making it so everyone can participate, watch, and share virtually as well.

This year they asked me to moderate the Think Tank which will be a fun new adventure for me, but my job will be made easy by this exceptional list of people that will be participating:

  • John Lynn (@techguy)
  • Paul Sonnier (@Paul_Sonnier)
  • Linda Stotsky (@EMRAnswers)
  • Joe Babaian (@JoeBabaian)
  • Dr. Joe Kim (@DrJosephKim)
  • Andy DeLaO (@cancergeek)
  • Dan Munro (@danmunro)
  • Dr. Jeff Trent (@TGen)
  • Shahid Shah (@ShahidNShah)
  • Dave Dimond(@NextGenHIT)
  • Mike Feibus (@MikeFeibus)

This panel is going to take on three hot topics in the healthcare industry today:

  • Consumerism in Healthcare
  • Precision Medicine
  • Big Data and AI in Healthcare

The great thing is that you can watch the whole #TransformHIT Think Tank event remotely on Livestream (recording will be available after as well). We’ll be watching the #TransformHIT tweet stream and messages to @DellEMCHealth during the event as well if you want to ask any questions or share any insights. We’ll do our best to add outside people’s comments and questions into the discussion. The Think Tank is being held in Phoenix, AZ, so if you’re local there are a few audience seats available if you’d like to come watch live and meet any of the panelists in person. Just let me know in the comments or on our contact us page and I can give you more details.

If you have an interest in healthcare consumerism, precision medicine, or big data and AI in healthcare, then please join us on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from Noon ET (9 AM PT) – 3 PM ET (Noon PT) for the live stream. It’s sure to be a lively and interesting discussion.
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What Do You Think Of Data Lakes?

Posted on October 4, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Being that I am not a high-end technologist, I’m not always up on the latest trends in database management – so the following may not be news to everyone who reads this. As for me, though, the notion of a “data lake” is a new one, and I think it a valuable idea which could hold a lot of promise for managing unruly healthcare data.

The following is a definition of the term appearing on a site called KDnuggets which focuses on data mining, analytics, big data and data science:

A data lake is a storage repository that holds a vast amount of raw data in its native format, including structured, semi-structured and unstructured data. The data structure and requirements are not defined until the data is needed.

According to article author Tamara Dull, while a data warehouse contains data which is structured and processed, expensive to store, relies on a fixed configuration and used by business professionals, a data link contains everything from raw to structured data, is designed for low-cost storage (made possible largely because it relies on open source software Hadoop which can be installed on cheaper commodity hardware), can be configured and reconfigured as needed and is typically used by data scientists. It’s no secret where she comes down as to which model is more exciting.

Perhaps the only downside she identifies as an issue with data lakes is that security may still be a concern, at least when compared to data warehouses. “Data warehouse technologies have been around for decades,” Dull notes. “Thus, the ability to secure data in a data warehouse is much more mature than securing data in a data lake.” But this issue is likely to receive in the near future, as the big data industry is focused tightly on security of late, and to her it’s not a question of if security will mature but when.

It doesn’t take much to envision how the data lake model might benefit healthcare organizations. After all, it may make sense to collect data for which we don’t yet have a well-developed idea of its use. Wearables data comes to mind, as does video from telemedicine consults, but there are probably many other examples you could supply.

On the other hand, one could always counter that there’s not much value in storing data for which you don’t have an immediate use, and which isn’t structured for handy analysis by business analysts on the fly. So even if data lake technology is less costly than data warehousing, it may or may not be worth the investment.

For what it’s worth, I’d come down on the side of the data-lake boosters. Given the growing volume of heterogenous data being generated by healthcare organizations, it’s worth asking whether deploying a healthcare data lake makes sense. With a data lake in place, healthcare leaders can at least catalog and store large volumes of un-normalized data, and that’s probably a good thing. After all, it seems inevitable that we will have to wring value out of such data at some point.

Healthcare Big Data Humor

Posted on April 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday and so it’s always a good time for a little Fun Friday to humor to kick off your weekend. This week’s edition is dedicated to all those working through the piles of healthcare data.

Healthcare Big Data Humor - Too Much Focus on Data

I’ve seen this at a few organizations. Although, I think the other problem is likely even more challenging in healthcare. We have all this data and all of this opportunity, where do we start?

Enjoy your weekend!

Dilbert DNA and Health Care Big Data Cartoon

Posted on December 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday! Not just any Friday, but a Friday leading up to the holiday season. How’s your Christmas shopping going? You know on Fridays I often like to have a Fun Friday post. This week it comes in the form of a great Dilbert cartoon that incorporates genetic DNA testing with health care big data. Enjoy!

Dilbert Health Care Big Data Cartoon

Healthcare Big Data Use, Real Patient Engagement, and Practice Marketing

Posted on May 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I use to do these a lot more and I think people enjoyed them. So, maybe I’ll start doing them again. It’s basically a short Twitter round up of some interesting tweets and often some pithy commentary about the tweets. Let me know what you think.


This seems about in line with my own personal experience talking to people. Although, some might argue that 100% are clueless. We’re all still trying to figure out all the data.


Great article by Michelle. I agree with her that I hate patient engagement. I love engaging patients, but I think that meaningful use requirements have forever corrupted the term patient engagement. We better move on to a new term, because I assure you that what’s happening with meaningful use is not engaging patients.


This is a little self serving, but Wednesday (5/6/15) I’ll be doing a webinar on the topic of practice marketing. I’m going to cover quite a bit of ground from a high quality practice website, to search engine optimization (SEO), reputation management, and meaningful patient engagement (sorry I had to use the term after my last comment). I hope many of you will attend and then let me know what you thought of it.

The Future Of…Healthcare Big Data

Posted on March 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

In yesterday’s post about The Future of…The Connected Healthcare System, I talked a lot about healthcare data and the importance of that data. So, I won’t rehash those topics in this post. However, that post will serve as background for why I believe healthcare has no clue about what big data really is and what it will mean for patients.

Healthcare Big Data History
If we take a quick look back in the history of big data in healthcare, most people will think about the massive enterprise data warehouses that hospitals invested in over the years. Sadly, I say they were massive because the cost of the project was massive and not because the amount of data was massive. In most cases it was a significant amount of data, but it wasn’t overwhelming. The other massive part was the massive amount of work that was required to acquire and store the data in a usable format.

This is what most people think about when they think of big data in healthcare. A massive store of a healthcare system’s data that’s been taken from a variety of disparate systems and normalized into one enterprise data warehouse. The next question we should be asking is, “what were the results of this effort?”

The results of this effort is a massive data store of health information. You might say, “Fantastic! Now we can leverage this massive data store to improve patient health, lower costs, improve revenue, and make our healthcare organization great.” That’s a lovely idea, but unfortunately it’s far from the reality of most enterprise data warehouses in healthcare.

The reality is that the only outcome was the enterprise data warehouse. Most project plans didn’t include any sort of guiding framework on how the enterprise data warehouse would be used once it was in place. Most didn’t include budget for someone (let alone a team of people) to mine the data for key organization and patient insights. Nope. Their funding was just to roll out the data warehouse. Organizations therefore got what they paid for.

So many organizations (and there might be a few exceptions out there) thought that by having this new resource at their fingertips, their staff would somehow magically do the work required to find meaning in all that data. It’s a wonderful thought, but we all know that it doesn’t work that way. If you don’t plan and pay for something, it rarely happens.

Focused Data Efforts
Back in 2013, I wrote about a new trend towards what one company called Skinny Data. No doubt that was a reaction to many people’s poor experiences spending massive amounts of money on an enterprise data warehouse without any significant results. Healthcare executives had no doubt grown weary of the “big data” pitch and were shifting to only want to know what results the data could produce.

I believe this was a really healthy shift in the use of data in a healthcare organization. By focusing on the end result, you can do a focused analysis and aggregation of the right data to be able to produce high quality results for an organization. Plus, if done right, that focused analysis and aggregation of data can serve as the basis for other future projects that will use some of the same data.

We’re still deep in the heart of this smart, focused healthcare data experience. The reality is that healthcare can still benefit so much from small slices of data that we don’t need to go after the big data analysis. Talk about low hanging fruit. It’s everywhere in healthcare data.

The Future of Big Data
In the future, big data will matter in healthcare. However, we’re still laying the foundation for that work. Many healthcare organizations are laying a great foundation for using their data. Brick by brick (data slice by data slice if you will), the data is being brought together and will build something amazingly beautiful.

This house analogy is a great one. There are very few people in the world that can build an entire house by themselves. Instead, you need some architects, framers, plumbers, electricians, carpenters, roofers, painters, designers, gardeners, etc. Each one contributes their expertise to build something that’s amazing. If any one of them is missing, the end result isn’t as great. Imagine a house without a plumber.

The same is true for big data. In most healthcare organizations they’ve only employed the architect and possibly bought some raw materials. However, the real value of leveraging big data in healthcare is going to require dozens of people across an organization to share their expertise and build something that’s amazing. That will require a serious commitment and visionary leadership to achieve.

Plus, we can’t be afraid to share our expertise with other healthcare organizations. Imagine if you had to invent cement every time you built a house. That’s what we’re still doing with big data in healthcare. Every organization that starts digging into their data is having to reinvent things that have already been solved in other organizations.

I believe we’ll solve this problem. Healthcare organizations I know are happy to share their findings. However, we need to make it easy for them to share, easy for other organizations to consume, and provide appropriate compensation (financial and non-financial). This is not an easy problem to solve, but most things worth doing aren’t easy.

The future of big data in healthcare is extraordinary. As of today, we’ve barely scraped the surface. While many may consider this a disappointment, I consider it an amazing opportunity.

Physician Focus, Data as King, and Real Time EHR Data

Posted on December 1, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I’m a little torn on this tweet. While I agree that there is too much administrative overhead in healthcare that distracts from patients and lifelong learning, I also think that things like EMR could contribute to both. A well implemented EMR software can help doctors focus on patients and help the doctor learn. This is certainly not the way most doctors look at EMR. Is this an EMR image problem or EMR software that’s not living up to its potential?


Of course, you have to take this tweet with a grain of salt since it comes from our very own Big Data Geek, Mandi Bishop. However, it’s an interesting topic of discussion. How important is the EMR data in healthcare today?


This tweet is related to the healthcare data tweet above. We all know that the EHR data isn’t perfect. Although, it’s worth noting that the paper chart wasn’t perfect either. However, I was more interested in the idea of real-time EHR data. I don’t think we’re there yet, but I’m interested to see how we could get there.

What’s Ahead After TEDMED 2013

Posted on May 15, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week, a number of TEDMED attendees and myself participated in a Google+ Hangout sponsored by Xerox to take a look back at our unique experiences at TEDMED 2013. The discussion included the following people:

  • Markus Fromherz, chief innovation officer of Xerox Healthcare
  • Benjamin Miller, assistant professor at the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine
  • Nick Dawson, chief experience officer at Frontier Health Consulting
  • John Lynn, editor and founder of the Healthcare Scene blog network

We made it a really focused 15 minute discussion of the key takeaways from TEDMED. Some of the topics we discussed included: healthcare big data, multidisciplinary collaboration, citizen science, patient centered care, and a look at TEDMED topics 5-10 years from now. It was a really great discussion, and I encourage you to watch the TEDMED recap video embedded below.

Read more coverage from TEDMED from Xerox on the Real Business at Xerox Blog and follow @XeroxHealthcare.

How Do You Improve the Quality of EHR Data for Healthcare Analytics?

Posted on May 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A month or so ago I wrote a post comparing healthcare big data with skinny data. I was introduced to the concept of skinny data by Encore Health Resources at HIMSS. I absolutely love the idea of skinny data that provides meaningful results. I wish we could see more of it in healthcare.

However, I was also intrigued by something else that James Kouba, HIT Strategist at Encore Health Resources, told me during our discussion at HIMSS. James has a long background in doing big data in healthcare. He told me about a number of projects he’d worked on including full enterprise data warehouses for hospitals. Then, he described the challenge he’d faced on his previous healthcare data warehouse projects: quality data.

Anyone that’s participated in a healthcare data project won’t find the concept of quality data that intriguing. However, James then proceeded to tell me that he loved doing healthcare data projects with Encore Health Resources (largely a consulting company) because they could help improve the quality of the data.

When you think about the consulting services that Encore Health Resources and other consulting companies provide, they are well positioned to improve data quality. First, they know the data because they usually helped implement the EHR or other system that’s collecting the data. Second, they know how to change the systems that are collecting the data so that they’re collecting the right data. Third, these consultants are often much better at working with the end users to ensure they’re entering the data accurately. Most of the consultants have been end users before and so they know and often have a relationship with the end users. An EHR consultant’s discussion with an end user about data is very different than a big data analyst trying to convince the end user why data matters.

I found this to be a really unique opportunity for companies like Encore Health Resources. They can bridge the gap between medical workflows and data. Plus, if you’re focused on skinny data versus big data, then you know that all of the data you’re collecting is for a meaningful purpose.

I’d love to hear other methods you use to improve the quality of the EHR data. What have you seen work? Is the garbage in leads to garbage out the key to quality data? Many of the future healthcare IT innovations are going to come from the use of healthcare data. What can we do to make sure the healthcare data is worth using?