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Kaiser’s Mobile Health Approach

Posted on July 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I mentioned in my previous post about laptops and iPads in healthcare, I had the chance to meet with Kaiser at the Health 2.0 conference in Boston. I had a chat with Brian Gardner, head of the Mobile Center of Excellence at Kaiser Permanente and learned a bunch of interesting things about how Kaiser looks at mobile healthcare.

The first most interesting thing to note was that Kaiser currently does not support any sort of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) at this time. Although, they said that they’ve certainly heard the requests from their doctors to find a way for the doctor to use their own mobile device. Since this means that all the mobile devices in use at Kaiser are issued by them, I was also a little surprised to find that the majority of their users are currently still using Blackberry devices.

Brian did say that the iPhone is now an approved Kaiser device. It will be interesting to check in with Brian and Kaiser a year from now to see how many Blackberry devices have been replaced with iPhones. I’m pretty sure we know exactly what’s going to happen, but I’ll have to follow up to find out. What is worth noting though is the time delay for an enterprise organization like Kaiser to be able to replace their initial investment in Blackberry devices with something like an iPhone or Android device. While I’m sure that many of those doctors have their own personal iPhones, that doesn’t mean they can use it for work.

I also asked Brian about the various ways that he sees the Kaiser physicians using their mobile devices. His first response was that a large part of them were using it as an email device. This would make some sense in the context of most of their devices being Blackberry phones which were designed for email.

He did say that Kaiser had done some video pilots on their mobile devices. I’ll be interested to hear the results of these pilot tests. It’s only a matter of time before we can do a video chat session with a doctor from our mobile device and what better place to start this than at Kaiser?

Of course, the other most popular type of mobile apps used at Kaiser were related to education apps. I wonder how many Epocrates downloads are used by Kaiser doctors every day. I imagine it gets a whole lot of use.

What I found even more intriguing was the way that Kaiser used to discover and implement apps. Brian described that many of their best apps have come from students or doctors who had an idea for an app. They then take that idea and make it a reality with that student or doctor working on the app. It sounded like many of these students or doctors saw a need and created an app. Then, after seeing its success Kaiser would spread it through the rest of the organization.

This final point illustrates so well how powerful mobile health can be now that the costs to developing a mobile health innovation is so low. Once you lower the cost of innovation the way mobile health has done, you open up the doors to a whole group of entrepreneurs to create amazing value.

Nuance Interviews Me and Jonathon Dreyer at Health 2.0 Boston

Posted on June 26, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m currently enjoying the depths of my first experience at ANI 2012 in Las Vegas. It’s been a really great experience meeting a number of healthcare CFO’s and some new healthcare vendors. If any of my readers are at ANI, I’d love to meet. You know how to find me on Twitter (@ehrandhit).

While I’m busy at the conference I thought I’d post some videos that Nuance did with me at Health 2.0 Boston. It was kind of fun for them to turn the tables and put me on camera with Jonathon Dreyer, Sr. Manager, Mobile Solutions Marketing, at Nuance Healthcare. The videos were broken into 3 parts: health IT trends, mobile adoption in health IT, and social media in healthcare. I hope you enjoy!

Health IT Trends

Mobile Adoption in Health IT

Social Media in Healthcare

Laptops End Up With Kids, iPads Don’t

Posted on June 8, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I mentioned previously, I had the great opportunity to talk with Kaiser recently about their mobile initiatives at Health 2.0 Boston. It was a great chat with Brian Gardner, head of the Mobile Center of Excellence at Kaiser Permanente.

At one point in the conversation I asked Brian about Kaiser’s approach to devices. Did they allow physicians to bring their own device? Were they deploying their own devices and which devices did they use. Brian made a couple of comments that I found really intriguing.

First, he stated clearly that Kaiser issued all of their devices. They were looking at the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) idea, but currently they didn’t support any BYOD options. Based on his response to this question I could tell that there were a lot of conversations about this topic happening at Kaiser. I got the feeling that they were likely getting quite a bit of pressure from their doctors to do something along these lines.

Brian then also provided what I find to be a really compelling observation. He commented that from their experience the laptops they issued to doctors always seemed to end up with their physician’s kids using them. I assume they could see this based upon the software the physician’s children installed on the laptop. Then, Brian observed that they hadn’t seen the same thing happening with the iPads they’d given out. He surmised that this was possibly because many of the doctors that got iPads saw it as a privilege and those doctors didn’t want to lose that privilege?

How intriguing no? Why is it that a laptop feels like a commodity and an iPad feels like a luxury item? One you don’t mind your children touching and the other is a luxury that your child shouldn’t touch.

I’d also extend this observation to say that working on a laptop feels like work. Using an iPad feels more like play. At least that’s the feeling I get. I imagine many doctors feel the same way. I wonder if that will change as the iPad starts to get more applications that really help you do work on it.

Mobile Health App Ratings by Kaiser

Posted on May 29, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently had the chance to sit down with Kaiser’s mobile group at the Health 2.0 conference in Boston. We had a really interesting discussion where I was able to learn a number of interesting things about Kaiser’s approach to mobile healthcare. As everyone knows they have a really unique environment with a number of incredible opportunities, but also with their own unique challenges. I’ll be discussing a number of these items in future posts.

Although one opportunity came to my mind in my discussion with Kaiser: A Mobile Health App Rating service by Kaiser.

Many people might remember my previous post about the atrocious idea of an mHealth App Certification. I think this is a really terrible idea and will do nothing to help physicians and patients be able to weed through the overwhelming number of mobile health apps.

With that side comment, I love the idea of Kaiser using its vast network of doctors and patients to rate various mobile health apps. Sure, there are some issues with this model as well, but the benefits of having so many valid doctors rate mobile health apps could be tremendous.

The challenge with most rating services is that you have no way of knowing if the person rating the service is actually who they say they are. For example, Sermo is supposedly a physician only forum. However, I know a lot of non-physicians that are on the forum. One advantage Kaiser has is that they could know if the person in their network is a Kaiser physician or not.

One key question is whether Kaiser would be open to making their physician mobile health app ratings available to the public. I’m sure this will be a tricky question for them to answer. No doubt they already kind of do some of this already in their internal network. Maybe it’s not totally codified into a website with a formal process, but it could be. Plus, the benefits to healthcare in general could be great.

What do you think of Kaiser physicians rating mobile health apps? Are there other better ways to filter through the volume of mobile health apps that exist out there?

The Current Health IT and EHR Bubble

Posted on May 16, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had a really great conversation with Shahid Shah, Jenny Laurello and John Moore at Health 2.0 about the bubble that we’re sitting in right now. John Moore’s response to my question, “When do you think the bubble will pop?” was priceless: “Which bubble?” Yes, we might be seeing multiple bubbles in healthcare IT: EHR, HIE, mobile health, etc.

For this blog, I’m most interested in the EHR bubble. Obviously, the bubble in this case is the creation of the $36 billion in EHR stimulus money that’s being handed out thanks to ARRA and the HITECH act. With over 600+ EHR vendors and a limited number of customers (I think there’s about 700,000 physicians in the US), there are going to be quite a few EHR vendors that won’t make it.

With that said, I don’t think the EHR bubble will pop like it has in other industries. In fact, I think the current IT industry bubble is going to be a much bigger problem. What’s amazing to me is how you can make a decent EHR business with only a few hundred doctors. Sure, a few hundred doctors won’t create 10 times return to investors, but those who take a conservative approach to building their EHR company could get by with what I believe is an astoundingly small customer base. Physicians are just that valuable.

Shahid Shah described EHR as a cottage industry and so cottage EHR companies will survive. I’m not exactly sure how he’d described cottage industry, but I think the regional nature of healthcare is definitely an influence on this. I’m sure many could argue that long term this strategy won’t work, but I believe at least for the forseeable future we’re not going to see the EHR bubble pop for a while.

As I think about the EHR companies I know, they all seem to have plenty of cash to make it through meaningful use stage 2 and likely all the way to meaningful use stage 3 at least. We’ll see how the smaller EHR companies do post meaningful use stage 2, but I don’t see any EHR vendors not making it to meaningful use stage 2. They’ll at least make it to MU stage 2. Then, based on their adoption results (or not) we may see a few EHR vendors run out of money.

What do you think? Are we in an EHR bubble? When will the EHR bubble pop? What other healthcare IT bubbles do you see?

EMR Data Inaccuracies, EMR and Labs, and the Database of Healthcare

Posted on May 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you read this post, I’m probably on a red eye flight to attend Health 2.0 Boston. I’m really excited to attend Health 2.0 Boston. I think Matthew Holt is always interesting and so I hope I get a chance to interview him while I’m there. Plus, I think it’s large enough to bring out some important people, but not so large that you’re overwhelmed and can’t connect with those who attend.

Also, even if you’re just in Boston and not planning to attend Health 2.0 Boston, we’re going to be doing a tweetup on Tuesday evening. I call it the after party. I’m not sure where we’ll do it, but watch @ehrandhit on Twitter and I’ll tweet out the exact time and location for the tweetup. I look forward to seeing all my Boston Healthcare IT friends.

Now, without further ado, some interesting EMR tweets:


The interesting part of the story linked above is that all of the inaccuracies could happen on paper as well.


Reminds me of the announcement that said that physicians order more labs with EHR. I know we implemented the lab cost display in our EHR, and I’m sure that the cheaper tests were ordered, but that was certainly due to the type of clinic that I implemented the feature.


The idea of the internet as a database is very interesting. It’s probably too forward thinking to be really practical today, but we’ll definitely get there. It’s just a question of how quickly. We’re already seeing indications of this. It’s amazing what you can build in a weekend using “internet parts” through powerful APIs.

Note: This post has been a meaningful use free post.