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Voting for the #HIT99 Starts Now!

Posted on July 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A few of my healthcare social media friends were talking about why there was no #HIT100 this year and suggested that in true social media fashion someone should pick it up and run with it and I was nominated. I’m always happy to run with a good idea. Especially when @ShimCode offered to take care of the hard work. We also wanted to respect that we didn’t start the #HIT100 and so we created our modified version called the #HIT99. In open source we’d call that a fork of the original project. Hopefully we can still have the same spirit of fun and healthcare social media discovery that was embodied by the original #HIT100 (See last year’s unofficial list).

The first #HIT100 was started by @theEHRGuy as a great way to celebrate the Fourth of July holiday and turned out to be a fun way to get to know many of the various healthcare social media influencers throughout the summer. This summer we hope we can do the same with the #HIT99.

If you missed past versions, the #HIT99 is a way for you to recognize your peers, friends, and heroes who have been contributing to the #HealthIT, #HITsm, #hcsm, #HITchicks, #hcldr, and other related communities through their tweets, blogs, books, etc. Your nomination is a small reward for their efforts and all of the nominations in aggregate make for an amazing list of people working to improve healthcare. Plus, we’re looking at having a great #HIT99 celebration/meetup at 2016 HIMSS in Las Vegas as well.

In order to make the nominations more meaningful, we ask that all nominations include the person being nominated, the #HIT99 hashtag, and a short phrase or hashtag identifying why you’re nominating that person. Explaining “Why” is not required, but you’ll receive bonus points from the person you’re nominating and the rest of the community for doing so.

Here’s an example nomination: “I nominate @HITConfGuy to the #HIT99 list, because he makes it easy for me to filter through the mass of tweets during HIMSS.”

We’ll be using the following rules for counting nominations:
1. Twitter accounts must have existed prior to today.
2. The nomination process is completely socially biased, but we’ll filter obvious abuse where reasonable (Did the Chilean Princess with no followers really nominate you?).
3. RTs will be counted if they include the required elements.
4. Thank you RTs by the person being nominated will not be counted, but we do encourage sincere gratitude being expressed to those who nominate you. If you remove the nomination from your tweet you’ll have more room to show thanks without cluttering the stream.
5. There will only be one round of voting.
6. Please do not include the #HITsm or other hashtags unless they apply to the person(s) being nominated. Let’s be conscious of unnecessarily adding tweets to everyone’s stream.
7. Nominations will be counted at the sole discretion of the hosts (This is for fun anyway, so don’t stress it.)
8. Last but not least, you must have lots of fun!

I’m looking forward to seeing all the nominations and the final list of 99 healthcare social media influencers. Plus, I can’t wait for all the tweets joking that they’re part of the 99.

Legal Disclaimer: By submitting a nomination, you agree that any statements are your own opinion otherwise you would not have written or tweeted the message. All statements, whether funny or not, are your own information and thoughts. Funny tweets add no weight to your vote, but if you make us laugh we’ll love you for it. All other generic disclaimers apply, we just couldn’t take up any more words to state them.
Thanks @Matt_R_Fisher

Past #HIT100 Lists:
2014 #HIT100
2013 #HIT100
2012 #HIT100
2011 #HIT100

#HITsm and #hcsm Highlights Around Twitter – mHealth Lists

Posted on December 29, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

The #HITsm Chat was put on hold for another week, so here are some of of my favorite tweets I found by searching #HITsm and #hcsm on Twitter. I saw a lot of lists this week, and thought these were kind of interesting.

This is a good list to review, for anyone that is hoping to find an Internet-savvy doctor. Obviously, most people aren’t going to be close enough to see these doctors, but there are a lot of interesting stats about them, and how they have embraced the Internet and Social Media in their practices. There is a good variety of doctors here, from different specialties  If you follow very many doctors on Twitter, you’ll probably recognize at least a handful of these names.

If you are wary about mHealth, or having your doctor be on Twitter and Facebook this list might put your mind at ease. There are so many benefits to doctors and physicians creating a more Internet-friendly practice, and many of them are listed here. I love that the doctor’s offices and hospitals that my family use have really embraced mHealth, and after reviewing this list, I am starting to recognize all the benefits that come from this.  Personally, I really love being able to connect with our doctor offices on Facebook, as well as on a patient portal — I’ve been able to get answers from nurses quickly, rather than having to actually go in to the doctor.

Some interesting insights about how medical care is getting better and better…and of course, as this tweet mentions, Health Apps is on the list. I’m not surprised by that one bit.

And finally, here’s a great list of resources for those in the healthcare industry that are wanting to make the jump into social media. There is an eBook, case studies, top blog posts, and more. This is definitely a must-have list for any pratice wanting to get more involved.

Have a happy New Year, everyone! Be sure to check back next week (over at EMR and EHR) for the #HITsm highlights.

A Smart Approach To Medicine And Social Media

Posted on August 29, 2012 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

It’s always a pleasure to touch base with the thoughtful blog  (33 Charts) written by pediatric gastroenterologist Dr. Bryan Vartabedian. This time, I caught a piece on how Dr. Vartabedian handles social media communication with patients, and I thought it was well worth a share.

While your mileage may vary, here’s some key ways Dr. Vartabedian handles medical contact online with consumers:

* He never answers patient-specific questions from strangers

As he notes, people generally ask two kinds of questions, patient-specific and non-patient specific. While he’s glad to answer general questions, he never answers patient-specific ones from strangers, as it could be construed that he’s created a professional relationship with the person asking the question.

* He guides patients he’s treating offline

If an existing patient messages Dr. Vartabedian, he messages back that he’d be happy to do a phone call. He then addresses their concern via phone, while explaining to patients how both he and they could face serious privacy issues if too much comes out online. Oh, and most importantly, he documents the phone encounter, noting that the patient who reached out in  public.

* He flatly turns down requests for info from people he loosely knows

The only exception he makes is for family and very close friends.  In those cases he arranges evening phone time and spends 45 minutes getting facts so he can offer high-quality direction.

I really like the way Dr. Vartabedian has outlined his options here — it’s clear, simple, and virtually impossible to misunderstand.  It’s hard to imagine anyone being offended by these policies, or more importantly, having their privacy violated.  Good to see!

If you’re a doctor how do you handle your social media interactions with patients?

Health IT List Season – A List of Lists

Posted on July 11, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everyone on the internet loves a good list. I know that when I see a list tweeted by someone I feel that natural impulse to click and see who made the list. There’s something about a list that is captivating and fascinating. Plus, if there’s a potential that we could be on the list, then our interest in that list skyrockets. Most of the time the order of the list doesn’t matter. There’s little need to put any sort of rigor into who makes the list or not. People are naturally attracted to lists. I’m sure there’s some cultural reason for this, but regardless of the why it’s just the current state of affairs.

Over the past couple weeks, it seems like it’s the season of the Health IT lists. Every other day or so another health IT list comes out. I predictably click through to see who or what’s made the list. Every once in a while I even make a list and I must admit that it’s quite exciting. There’s something beautiful about having your name in lights. Add in the social media response that often accompanies making a list, and it’s really quite intoxicating. I of course try not to inhale.

I actually partially questioned one of the current list making efforts, the #HIT100, near the end of the #HITsm chat this week. I tweeted, “That’s the real problem with the #HIT100 It’s hard to really rank it and is easily gamed. #HITsm” Michael Planchart that puts together the #HIT100 replied, “I don’t understand why it would be easily gamed? #HIT100 #HITsm” Instead of sharing how people could game the ranking, I instead replied, “It’s not a large enough community to really do a ranking. The list is interesting regardless of how they are ranked #HIT100 #HITsm”

Interestingly enough, someone who saw our conversation privately sent me this message, “Here’s some reasons: New accounts created to vote. Non-industry people voting, staff voting en masse for boss, Mom voting, etc.” and then this follow up “We all have out pet projects and little ego things! :’) Thinking of a blog post about this – but don’t want to alienate #HIT100 friends :)” He was right about treading lightly (a challenge for me) so you don’t alienate others in the Health IT community. Although, by doing so we also miss out on some really meaningful conversations.

Michael also responded, “The purpose of the list is to introduce #HealthIT folks to each other. The ranking is just the fun part of it. #HIT100”

I agree with Michael that it’s a great way to learn about new #HealthIT people on Twitter. Although, I think Michael underestimates the power of the rankings. As I described above, being ranked and where you rank has a much bigger impact on people both consciously and unconsciously. To be honest, it’s part of the reason why I haven’t actually nominated anyone to the #HIT100….yet(?). I’d probably have to sit down and nominate 100 health IT people myself to do it justice. There’s just so many good ones, that I’m not sure where I’d start.

I actually like the way that Michelle McNickle (I’ve fallen in love with her work lately) handled her list of 10 Health IT bloggers on Healthcare IT News. Instead trying to rank them and instead of trying to be complete, she just said that these were “some of the best HIT bloggers actively using Twitter.” The ironic thing was that similar to that telephone game we’d play as kids, the list got tweeted as “Top 10 Health IT Bloggers.”

I also loved that Kristi Ellis (one of the @HealthyComms Twins) took the #HIT100 and made it into a blog post. I hope that the #HIT100 spawns more lists like this from people in the industry. One thing I would have loved to see in that blog post was a short description of why Kristi added that person to her list.

We need more blog interaction like Kristi is doing and now to some extent I’m doing with this post. I’ve discussed this a bit before, but I think in the age of Twitter were losing out on some of the deeper conversations. Instead of putting together a thoughtful blog post reply to someone else’s blog post we just post it on Twitter with 2 words or hit the retweet button and move on. Each of those has its place, but a part of me still yearns for those blog responses which add depth to the conversation.

There you have it. A few thoughts on the various health IT lists I’ve seen being passed around. What do you think? I know I can’t wait until I see the next list. Let me know if you know of others.

Healthcare Social Media #hcsm

Posted on March 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been reading tweet after tweet recently about healthcare social media. I guess that’s appropriate that they’re using social media to talk about healthcare social media. Reminds me of a tweet from SXSW recently that said they were tweeting from a talk by Twitter Founder talking about the start of Twitter. That’s pretty meta.

Let’s take a look at a few of these tweets:

I love Dr. Bobby Ghaheri. He’s not afraid to talk about the issues of social media in healthcare head on. He’s also not afraid to use them too…even with patients. I’m sure that MANY doctors will have major issues and inhibitions about engaging patients on social media (even outside of medical care). When you even mention the idea you can brace yourself for the insane patient who has unreasonable requests and how that could translate if you engaged them in social media. I should get Dr. Ghaheri to do an interview with me about social media.

This next tweet I think describes Dr. Ghaheri very well.

Note that the tweet says to have a good offense. That doesn’t mean you should be wreckless or thoughtless in your approach to healthcare social media. It means you take a reasoned and well thought out approach to find ways that social media can benefit you as a doctor.

I understand where this tweet is coming from. Although, I don’t necessarily agree. It’s kind of like trying to lead a doctor to EHR that just frankly doesn’t want to do it. The human will is one of the most powerful things in the world. I don’t want to lead and lure someone into doing something they don’t want to do.

Personally I approach it much different. I prefer to convert them to the idea of social media (or EHR if you prefer) and then there’s no leading or luring required. Instead it’s about supporting, directing and educating. That subtle change makes an enormous difference!

I’ll end this little roundup of healthcare social media thoughts with this insightful look at types of patients and the benefits of social media to the various types of patients from a blog post by Jay Parkinson.

My biggest problem with Jay’s thoughts on healthcare social media is that it assumes our current model of healthcare. I can’t help but wonder if social media will help to inform the patient population in ways that we are attracted to healthcare even when we’re not “sick.” I call this treating the healthy patient. Social media awareness could be the driver behind this new trend.

EMR As Electronic Version of Chart…Or is it EHR?

Posted on October 9, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re back once again with our weekend roundup of a few interesting EMR and healthcare IT related tweets. Seems like the #hcsm chat was enjoying tweeting about some of the challenges of EMR and EHR:

@RyanMadanickMD
Ryan Madanick, MD
EMR=elec versn of chart RT @MrPug94: T1 #hcsm There really isn’t a true provider-patient collaboration platform. #EMR is simply a database

I agree with the assertion. Although, the reason an EMR is just a database and not a true provider-patient collaboration platform is because there’s no exchange of data. That’s what’s missing most from today’s EMR software.

Then, I also saw this related tweet about EHR:

@JackWestMD
H. Jack West, MD
Also, w/#EMR, it has never been easier to produce so much boilerplated documentation that says so little. #hcsm

I know where this comment comes from, but as I said in previous posts. I think we’re ready to see a revolution in clinical documentation that kicks against the boiler plate documentation that’s been so dominate in legacy EHR software.

Plus, is anyone else still kind of annoyed that we’re still debating whether to use EMR or EHR?

@EHRgeek
Helen Phung
@ehrwatch @nestorarellano @WittRZ Used interchangeably. #EHR refers more often to a physician/patient facing record while #EMR is for docs.

Personally, I have one thing to say about the EMR or EHR debate: Who cares? Once you can use them interchangeably to communicate the same thing, it really doesn’t matter. I tell you now that it really doesn’t matter.