Will We Be Maintaining Our Genomic Health Record?

Posted on May 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re interested in Genomic Medicine like I am, be sure to check out my article on EMR and EHR called “When Will Genomic Medicine Become As Common As Antibiotics?” That’s a really interesting question that’s worth considering. We’re not there yet and won’t get there for a couple years. However, I think that genomic medicine will become as common as antibiotics and will have a massive impact on healthcare the way antibiotics have as well.

The article mentioned links to a genomics whitepaper that talks about a person’s genomic health record. I’d never heard the term before, but I’m definitely intrigued by the idea of everyone having their own genomic health record.

We’ve talked forever about people having a personal health record which they need to collect and maintain. Some people store it in a PHR on the web and others store it on a mobile phone. However, we’ve never really seen the personal health record take off. This is true for a number of reasons. The first is that it’s still quite difficult to aggregate your entire health record across multiple providers. I even read of one PHR that was paying doctors to provide them a patient’s record. The second problem is that patients don’t know what to do with all the records once they have them. Even if they go to their doctor and say they have their full patient record, the doctor hands them a stack of health history forms to fill out. Best case, they file a copy of the patients records in the chart (usually in some sort of PDF or paper copy).

Now let’s think about those challenges from the perspective of a genomic health record. If you’ve paid thousands of dollars for genomic tests and analysis, are you going to want to pay that again to the next doctor you see? No, they’re going to ask you for your copy of their genomic record and use that as part of your care. Patients won’t want to pay for another genomic test and it will be easier to get their record, so they’ll be more motivated to get and maintain it than they were with a simple personal health record. It’s pretty compelling to consider.

Some challenges and questions I have about how this will evolve. Will your PHR start to include your genomic health record or will it be something that’s stored separately? Will their be a standard for the genomic health record so that the doctor can easily use that record in the work they’re doing? Will the genomic health record be so large that it will have to be stored in the cloud?

What do you think of the concept of a genomic health record?