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Genomic Medicine

Posted on February 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last month I was lucky to lead a panel discussion on the topic of genomics in medicine at CES. I was joined on the panel by Andy De, Global Managing Director and General Manager for Healthcare and Life Sciences at Tableau, and Aaron Black, Director, Informatics, Inova Translational Medicine Institute. There certainly wasn’t enough time in our session to get to everything that was really happening in genomics, but Andy and Aaron do a great job giving you an idea of what’s really happening with genomics and the baseline of genomic data that’s being set for the future. You can see what I mean in the video below:

Be sure to see all of the conferences where you can find Healthcare Scene.

Will Your Healthcare Analytics Solution Scale?

Posted on October 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the big themes being talked about at the Healthcare IT Transformation Assembly this week and particularly during my Care Performance Transformation roundtable with Midas+ has been around healthcare analytics and the solutions that will help a hospital utilize their data for population health, value based reimbursement, and improved care. This has made for an interesting discussion for me after having attended SAP Teched last week where SAP talked about the need for the right healthcare data solution that can scale to the needs of healthcare.

At both of these events it became very clear that the future of healthcare is being built on the back of healthcare data. The quantity and quality of healthcare data is expanding rapidly. There’s a lot of healthcare data being generated within the 4 walls of every healthcare organization. There’s a lot of healthcare data being generated outside of the healthcare setting. Plus, we’re just barely getting started with all of the data that’s needed for all the -omics (Genomics and Proteomics). Getting a handle on this data and ensuring the data can be trusted is of paramount concern for healthcare leaders.

What seems to be playing out is healthcare organizations are having to choose to invest in both point solutions and larger healthcare analytics solutions. Unfortunately there doesn’t seem to be one catch all solution that will solve all of a healthcare organization’s data transformation needs. None of the current solutions scale across all types of data and solve all of the current healthcare requirements. Although, some could eventually grow into that role.

In today’s discussion in particular, a number of hospital CIOs made clear that they had no choice but to have a variety of care transformation and healthcare analytics solutions. There wasn’t one integrated solution they could purchase and be done. In many ways it reminds me of the early days of PM, HIS, LIS, and EHR purchasing. Most purchased them separately because there wasn’t one integrated solution. However, over time people moved to buying one integrated system across PM, EHR, LIS, etc as the software become integrated and mature. Will we see the same thing happen with our healthcare analytics solutions?

While we’ve seen the move to more integrated healthcare IT solutions, we’re also seeing a move away from that now as well. Every EHR vendor is working on APIs to allow third party companies to integrate new solutions with the EHR. There’s a realization that it would be nice if the EHR could do everything in one nicely integrated solution, but it won’t. It’s a cycle that we see in software. I imagine we’ll see that same cycle with healthcare analytics solutions as well.

Will We Be Maintaining Our Genomic Health Record?

Posted on May 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re interested in Genomic Medicine like I am, be sure to check out my article on EMR and EHR called “When Will Genomic Medicine Become As Common As Antibiotics?” That’s a really interesting question that’s worth considering. We’re not there yet and won’t get there for a couple years. However, I think that genomic medicine will become as common as antibiotics and will have a massive impact on healthcare the way antibiotics have as well.

The article mentioned links to a genomics whitepaper that talks about a person’s genomic health record. I’d never heard the term before, but I’m definitely intrigued by the idea of everyone having their own genomic health record.

We’ve talked forever about people having a personal health record which they need to collect and maintain. Some people store it in a PHR on the web and others store it on a mobile phone. However, we’ve never really seen the personal health record take off. This is true for a number of reasons. The first is that it’s still quite difficult to aggregate your entire health record across multiple providers. I even read of one PHR that was paying doctors to provide them a patient’s record. The second problem is that patients don’t know what to do with all the records once they have them. Even if they go to their doctor and say they have their full patient record, the doctor hands them a stack of health history forms to fill out. Best case, they file a copy of the patients records in the chart (usually in some sort of PDF or paper copy).

Now let’s think about those challenges from the perspective of a genomic health record. If you’ve paid thousands of dollars for genomic tests and analysis, are you going to want to pay that again to the next doctor you see? No, they’re going to ask you for your copy of their genomic record and use that as part of your care. Patients won’t want to pay for another genomic test and it will be easier to get their record, so they’ll be more motivated to get and maintain it than they were with a simple personal health record. It’s pretty compelling to consider.

Some challenges and questions I have about how this will evolve. Will your PHR start to include your genomic health record or will it be something that’s stored separately? Will their be a standard for the genomic health record so that the doctor can easily use that record in the work they’re doing? Will the genomic health record be so large that it will have to be stored in the cloud?

What do you think of the concept of a genomic health record?

The Future Of…Healthcare Innovation

Posted on March 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Innovation is a fascinating concept. Historians and philosophers have been thinking and investigating the key to innovation forever. I’m not sure anyone has ever found the true secret sauce to innovation. Every innovation I’ve ever seen has been a mix of timing, luck, and hard work.

Some times the timing is not right for a product and therefore it fails. The product might have been great, but the timing wasn’t right for it to be rolled out. Innovation always requires a little luck. Maybe it was the chance meeting with an investor that helps take and idea to the next level. Maybe it’s the luck of getting the right exposure that catapults your idea into a business. Maybe it’s the luck of the right initial end users which shape the direction of the product. Every innovation has also required hard work. In fact, the key to ensuring you’re ready for luck to be heaped upon you or to test if your timing is right is to put in the work.

The great thing is that it’s a brilliant time to be working on innovations in healthcare. We’re currently at the beginning of a confluence of healthcare innovations. Each one on its own might seem like a rather small innovation, but taken together they’re going to provide amazing healthcare innovations that shape the future of healthcare as we know it.

Let me give a few examples of the wave of innovations that are happening. Health sensors are exploding. Are ability to know in real time how well our body is performing is off the charts. There are sensors out there for just about every measurable aspect of the human body. The next innovation will be to take all this sensor data and collapse it down into appropriate communication and actions.

Another example, is the innovations in genomic medicine. The cost and speed required to map your genome is collapsing faster than Moore’s law. All of that genomic data is going to be available to innovators who want to build something on top of it.

3D printing is progressing at light speed. Don’t think this applies to healthcare? Check out this 3D printed prosthetic hand or this 3D printed heart. If you really want your mind blown, check out people’s work to provide blood to 3D printed organs.

If you think we’ve gotten value out of healthcare data, you’re kidding yourself. There are so many innovations in healthcare data that are sitting there waiting in healthcare data hoards. We just need to tap into that data and start sharing those findings with a connected healthcare system.

The mobile device is an incredible innovation just waiting for healthcare. We are all essentially walking around with a computer in our pocket now. We’ve already started to see the innovations this will provide healthcare, but it’s only just the beginning. This computer in our pocket will become the brain and communication hub for our healthcare needs.

I’m sure you can think of other innovations that I haven’t mentioned including robotics, health literacy, healthcare gaming, etc. What’s most exciting to me about the future of healthcare innovation is that each of these innovations will combine into a unforeseen innovation. The most powerful innovations in healthcare will not be a single innovative idea. Instead, it will come from someone who combines multiple innovations into one beautiful package.

The most exciting part of innovation is that it’s usually unexpected and surprising. I love surprises. What do you see as the future building blocks of innovation in healthcare?

The Future Of…The Connected Healthcare System

Posted on March 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

As I think about the future of a connected healthcare system, I get very excited. Although, that excitement is partially tamed by the realization that many of these connections could have been happening for a long time. A connected healthcare system is not a technological challenge, but is a major cultural challenge for healthcare.

The Data Connected Healthcare System
Implementation challenges aside, the future of healthcare absolutely revolves around a connected healthcare system. In the short term these connections will focus on sharing the right data with the right person at the right time. Most of that data will be limited to data inside the EHR. What’s shocking is that we’re not doing this already. I guess we are doing this already, but in a really disconnected fashion (see Fax machine). That’s what’s so shocking. We already have the policies in place that allow us to share healthcare data with other providers. We’re sharing that data across fax machines all day every day. Over the next 3-5 years we’ll see a continuous flow of this data across other electronic channels (Direct Project, FHIR, HIEs, etc).

More exciting to consider is the future integration of consumer health device data into the healthcare system. I’m certain I’ll see a number of stories talking about this integration at HIMSS already. These “pilot” integrations will set the groundwork for much wider adoption of external consumer health data. The key tipping point to watch for in this is when EHR vendors start accepting this data and presenting the data to doctors in a really intuitive way. This integration will absolutely change the game when it comes to connecting patient collected data with the healthcare system.

What seems even more clear to me is that we all still have a very myopic view of how much data we’re going to have available to us about a person’s health. In my above two examples I talk about the EHR patient record (basically physician’s charts) and consumer health devices. In the later example I’m pretty sure you’re translating that to the simple examples of health tracking we have today: steps, heart rate, weight, blood pressure, etc. While all of this data is important, I think it’s a short sighted view of the explosion of patient data we’ll have at our fingertips.

I still remember when I first heard the concept of an IP Address on Every Organ in your body reporting back health data that we would have never dreamed imaginable. The creativity in sensors that are detecting anything and everything that’s happening in your blood, sweat and tears is absolutely remarkable. All of that data will need to be connected, processed, and addressed. How amazing will it be for the healthcare system to automatically schedule you for heart surgery that will prevent a heart attack before you even experience any symptoms?

Of course, we haven’t even talked about genomic data which will be infiltrating the healthcare system as well. Genomic data use to take years to process. Now it’s being done in weeks at a price point that’s doable for many. Genomic medicine is going to become a standard for healthcare and in some areas it is already.

The connected healthcare system will have to process more data than we can even imagine today. Good luck processing genomic data, sensor data, device data, and medical chart data using paper.

It’s All About Communication
While I’ve focused on connecting the data in the healthcare system of the future, that doesn’t downplay the need for better communication tools in the future connected healthcare system. Healthcare data can discover engagement points, but communication with patients will cause the change in our healthcare system.

Do you feel connected to your doctor today? My guess is that most of you would be like me and say no (Although, I’m working to change that culture for me and my family). The future connected healthcare system is going to have to change that culture if we want to improve healthcare and lower healthcare costs. Plus, every healthcare reimbursement model of the future focuses on this type of engagement.

The future connected healthcare system actually connects the doctor’s office and the patient to treat even the healthy patient. In fact, I won’t be surprised if we stop talking about going for a doctor’s visit and start talking about a health check up or some health maintenance. Plus, who says the health check up or maintenance has to be in the doctors office. It might very well be over a video chat, email, instant message, social media, or even text.

This might concern many. However, I’d describe this as healthcare integration into your life. We’ll have some stumbles along the way. We’ll have some integrations that dig too deeply into your life. We’ll have some times when we rely too heavily on the system and it fails us. Sometimes we’ll fail to show the right amount of empathy in the communication. Sometimes we’ll fail to give you the needed kick in the pants. Sometimes, we’ll make mistakes. However, over time we’ll calibrate the system to integrate seamlessly into your life and improve your health based on your personalized needs.

The future Connected Healthcare System is a data driven system which facilitates the right communication when and where it’s needed in a seamless fashion.