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April Fool’s Day – Health IT Edition

Posted on April 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you know that I love a good April Fool’s day joke. I don’t like those that hurt people, but I love good humor (ask me about the time my wife said she was going into labor and wasn’t). You may remember my past years’ pranks about the #HIT100 Health IT Company, the ONC Reality TV show, and my personal favorite where we announced we’d be selling our own EHR software. Good memories all around.

This year I’ve been busy organizing the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy other people’s work. I’m sure I’ve missed some of the great health IT related April Fool’s day jokes, so let me know of others in the comments.

The big winner for April Fool’s 2016 for me was SnapChart from Twine Health. You’ll particularly enjoy it if you’re a SnapChat user, but it’s a great one either way. This video should demonstrate what I mean:

Well done Twine Health! I think even patient privacy advocates would appreciate SnapChart. “We all know that EHRs suck. Well this EHR only sucks for 7 seconds….BOOM”

Another honorable mention goes to Epic who has a long standing tradition of offering something entertaining on April Fool’s Day:
Epic April Fool's Day 2016
*Click on the image to see a larger version

Nice work by Epic to keep it topical with reference to Clinton and Sanders. However, the one that takes the cake is Jonathan Bush using MyChart. The only thing that would make me laugh more would be if athenahealth put out a video response from Jonathan Bush. Please?!

Cureatr decided to go old school with a new technology called the Faxenatr:

Howard Green, MD posted this announcement from Alphabet Inc and Google Inc’s company Verily Life Sciences about the UHIT (Universal Health Information Technology).

So many others I could mention outside of health IT. This one from Samsung about a 3D holographic projection was cool:


Although, when you look at what’s happening with VR, maybe it will be more reality than we realize.

Gmail’s Mic Drop is pretty funny. Well, at least it was until people starting losing their job because of it. The concept of a mic drop on email or social media is pretty interesting though. I wonder if there’s a way you could really implement something like it.

What other April Fool’s day jokes have you seen. It’s Friday. We all need a good laugh.

Expecting Evolutionary, Not Revolutionary at #HIMSS16

Posted on February 26, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’m deep in the weeds of planning for the HIMSS 2016 Annual conference. Actually, at this point on the Friday before HIMSS, I’m more or less planned. Now I’m just sitting here and wondering what things I might have missed. With that said, I’ve been preparing for this live video interview with the Samsung CMO which starts in 30 minutes (it’s recorded in case you miss the live discussion) and so I’ve been thinking about what I’m going to see at HIMSS. As someone who follows the changes in healthcare technology every day, I’m expecting lots of evolutionary changes and very little revolutionary.

As I think about it, I’m trying to imagine what someone could announce that would be revolutionary. That includes thinking back to past HIMSS to what announcements really revolutionized the industry. I can only think of two announcements that come close. The first announcement was when the meaningful use regulations were dropped right before the ONC session at HIMSS. Few people would argue that meaningful use has not revolutionized healthcare IT. Certainly many people would argue that it’s been a revolution that’s damaged the industry. Regardless of whether you see meaningful use as positive or negative, it’s changed so many things about healthcare IT.

The second announcement that stands out in my mind was the CommonWell health alliance. I’m a little careful to suggest that it was a revolutionary announcement because years later interoperability is still something that happens for a few days at the HIMSS Interoperability showcase and then a few point implementations, but isn’t really a reality for most. However, CommonWell was a pretty interesting step forward to have so many competing EHR companies on stage together to talk about working together. Of course, it was also notable that Epic wasn’t on stage with them. This year I’ve seen a number of other EHR vendors join CommonWell (still no Epic yet), so we’ll see if years later it finally bears the fruits of what they were talking about when they announced the effort.

The other problem with the idea that we’ll see something revolutionary at HIMSS 2016 is that revolutions take time. Revolutionary technology or approaches don’t just happen based on an announcement at a conference. That’s true even if the conference is the largest healthcare IT conference in the world. Maybe you could see the inkling of the start of the revolution, but then you’re gazing into a crystal ball.

The second problem for me personally is that I see and communicate with so many of these companies throughout the year. In just the last 6 months I’ve seen a lot of the HIMSS 2016 companies at various events like CES, RSNA, MGMA, AHIMA, etc. With that familiarity everything starts to settle into an evolution of visions and not something revolutionary.

Of course, I always love to be surprised. Maybe someone will come out with something revolutionary that changes my perspective. However, given the culture of healthcare and it’s ability to suppress revolutionary ideas, I’ll be happy to see all the amazing evolution in technology at HIMSS. Plus, the very best revolutionary ideas are often just multiple evolutionary ideas combined together in a nice package.

What’s Happening at MEDITECH w/ Helen Waters, VP @MEDITECH

Posted on January 25, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: Here’s the video recording of my interview with Helen Waters from MEDITECH

MEDITECH - Helen Waters

Many in the large hospital EHR space have argued that it’s a two horse race between Cerner and Epic. However, many forget how many users MEDITEH still has using its healthcare IT products. Not to mention MEDITECH was originally founded in 1969 and has a rich history working in the space. On Friday, January 29, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT), I’ll be sitting down with Helen Waters, VP at MEDITECH to talk about the what’s happening with MEDITECH and where MEDITECH fits into the healthcare IT ecosystem.

You can join my live conversation with Helen Waters and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask Helen questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Friday, January 29, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

We’re interested to hear Helen’s comments about the culture and history of MEDITECH along with what MEDITECH’s doing with its products to change perceptions and misconceptions around the MEDITECH product. We’ll also be sure to ask Helen about important topics like interoperability and physician dissatisfaction (“Too Many Clicks!”). We hope you’ll join us to learn more about what’s happening with MEDITECH.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Cerner, Leidos, and Accenture Win DoD EHR Project – $4.3 Billion

Posted on July 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

All the news at the end of the day yesterday was around Cerner (and their major partners Leidos, Accenture) winning the DoD EHR project. We’d been told the decision would come by the end of the month and you knew a decision was close once the major news organizations started writing about what a waste the DoD EHR project will be before they’d even named the winner. That’s called priming the pump. Of course, the critics make some good points about the DoD EHR project dealing with today instead of the future, and they also suggested that “We’re going to make Epic or Cerner the Standard Oil of health IT. It will become a monopoly at a time when we need to be moving to solutions that allow everyone to participate.”

I guess now that we know that Cerner has won the DoD contract, does that make them the Standard Oil of Health IT?

What we do know is that Cerner, Leidos, and Accenture were awarded the $4,336,822,777 (Our government’s so precise they got a 10 year project down to the dollar?) EHR contract with it projected to be around $9 billion over the life of the 10 year contract. That’s massive by any terms. It’s also much less than the projected $11 billion that was previously discussed. I guess competition for the DoD EHR contract brought the price down? Although, how often does the government project the costs for a project and then they balloon over the life of the project. According to Healthcare IT News, they’ll be working on bringing their first sites live in the Pacific Northwest by the end of 2016 and 1000 sites by 2022.

A lot of people have been commenting how this is a big win for Cerner and a big loss for Epic. Of course, I wrote a little over a year ago that the best thing for Epic might be to NOT win the DoD EHR contract. You can be sure that many hospital systems won’t be selecting Cerner now that they’re going to be tied up with the massive DoD EHR contract. Who does that leave? In most cases, that will leave Epic. I can’t help but wonder how many Soarian users will now decide to go to Epic instead of Cerner as well because of the Cerner win. Cerner should start working on this potential perception problem.

You can imagine the celebrations happening at the companies that won this contract. HIStalk posted a great image that shows all the partners that will be involved in the bid:
DoD EHR Partners

While they may be celebrating the contract now, it reminds me of startup companies who do big celebrations when they raise a round of funding. Those celebrations are premature since it’s really the start of all the hard work to come.

I personally lean more towards G Gordon Liddie’s comment on the HIStalk post on this subject:

Cerner will do as good a job as Epic would have done…which won’t be great. The federal government can’t pull off something like this.

I think this shares many people’s fears of a project this size. Others might suggest, if the government can’t roll out an insurance exchange website without major issues, how are they going to make an EHR roll out which is much more complex a success. I’m sure Cerner, Leidos, and Accenture will be thinking about this every day for the next 5-10 years.

Other DoD EHR Coverage:
Healthcare IT News
nextGov
HIStalk
MedCityNews

HIM Departments Need More Support

Posted on July 16, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As both a contributor to this blog, and an assertive, activist patient managing chronic conditions, I get to see both sides of professional health information management.  And I have to say that while health data management pros obviously do great things against great odds, support for their work doesn’t seem to have trickled down to the front lines.  I’m speaking most specifically about Medical Records (oops, I mean Health Information Management) departments in hospitals.

As I noted in a related blog post, I recently had a small run-in with the HIM department of a local hospital which seems emblematic of this problem. The snag occurred when I reached out to DC-based Sibley Memorial Hospital and tried to get a new log-in code for their implementation of Epic PHR MyChart. The clerk answering the phone for that department told me, quite inaccurately, that if I didn’t use the activation code provided on my discharge summary papers within two days, my chance to log in to the Johns Hopkins MyChart site was forever lost. (Sibley is part of the Johns Hopkins system.)

Being the pushy type that I am, I complained to management, who put me in touch with the MyChart tech support office. The very smart and help tech support staffer who reached out to me expressed surprise at what I’d been told as a) the code wasn’t yet expired and b) given that I supplied the right security information she’d have been able to supply me with a new one.  The thing is, I never would have gotten to her if I hadn’t known not to take the HIM clerk’s word at face value.

Note: After writing the linked article, I was able to speak to the HIM department leader at Sibley, and she told me that she planned to address the issue of supporting MyChart questions with her entire staff. She seemed to agree completely that they had a vital role in the success of the PHR and patient empowerment generally, and I commend her for that.

Now, I realize that HIM departments are facing what may be the biggest changes in their history, and that Madame Clerk may have been an anomaly or even a temp. But assuming she was a regular hire, how much training would it have taken for the department managers to require her to simply give out the MyChart tech support number? Ten minutes?  Five? A priority e-mail demanding that PHR/digital medical record calls be routed this way would probably have done the trick.

My take on all of this is that HIM departments seem to have a lot of growing up to do. Responsible largely for pushing paper — very important paper but paper nonetheless — they’re now in the thick of the health data revolution without having a central role in it. They aren’t attached to the IT department, really, nor are they directly supporting physicians — they’re sort of a legacy department that hasn’t got as clearly defined a role as it did.

I’m not suggesting that HIM departments be wiped off the map, but it seems to me that some aggressive measures are in order to loop them in to today’s world.

Obviously, training on patient health data access is an issue. If HIM staffers know more about patient portals generally — and ideally, have hands-on experience with them, they’ll be in a better position to support such initiatives without needing to parrot facts blindly. In other words, they’ll do better if they have context.

HIM departments should also be well informed as to EMR and other health data system developments. Sure, the senior people in the department may already be looped in, but they should share that knowledge at brown bag lunches and staff update sessions freely and often. As I see it, this provides the team with much-needed sense of participation in the broader HIT enterprise.

Also, HIM staff members should encourage patients who call to log in and leverage patient portals. Patients who call the hospital with only a vague sense that they can access their health data online will get routed to that department by the switchboard. HIM needs to be well prepared to support them.

These concerns should only become more important as Meaningful Use Stage 3 comes on deck. MU Stage 3 should provide the acid test as to whether whether hospital HIM departments are really ready to embrace change.

Meaningful Use EHR Adoption Charts – EHR Market Analysis

Posted on June 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ONC continues to push out more data when it comes to meaningful use, EHR adoption, RECs, and related areas. As a data addict, I could spend forever looking through and analyzing this data. So, I’ll probably do a series of posts across Healthcare Scene over the next couple weeks looking at the charts and data that ONC has made public about meaningful use and EHR adoption. I know some of the charts have been out for a while, but the analysis should still prove useful.

If you want to join in on the analysis of this data, I welcome you in the comments of each post. Plus, if you want to find your own nuggets to share, I’d suggest starting with their quick stats and dashboards pages.

First up in our look at the ONC EHR data is a look at the meaningful use participation chart for ambulatory EHR vendors (eligible providers if you prefer):
Ambulatory Practice EHR Adoption - Meaningful Use Participation
The most important part of this chart to me is that the two largest bars on the chart. The largest bar is the 749 “Other EHR Vendors” category at the bottom of the chart. It’s easy to miss this bar, but I believe it’s extremely important to note how big the long tail is when it comes to ambulatory EHR adoption. I’ve often said that it doesn’t take that many doctors to make yourself a decent EHR business. This chart illustrates how many EHR vendors are still in the game. There are only 3 EHR vendors that have over 40,000 providers. I know that many think that EHR vendor consolidation is bound to happen. Some certainly will, but I don’t see it happening at a massive scale in the ambulatory EHR world.

The second largest bar on the chart is the Epic EHR adoption. What’s important about this bar is that this totally represents that hospital owned ambulatory EHR adoption. Epic does not and will not sell Epic directly to a small ambulatory provider. All of these “eligible providers” for Epic are in hospital systems. I take away two important things from this. First, we see in plain sight how big the roll up of ambulatory practices is by hospitals. Second, this chart illustrates the opportunity that Cerner and Meditech have available to them. As you’ll see in the next chart, Cerner and Meditech have more hospital installs than Epic, but they’re much farther down on the ambulatory side. A look at history explains why they’ve had trouble penetrating the ambulatory market, but I believe it’s a huge opportunity for them going forward.

I’ll be interested to see how this chart continues to evolve over time. Will we doctors leaving hospitals to go back on their own shift the balance of power? Will we see massive EHR consolidation? I also can’t help but note that Mitochon Systems Inc shows up on the list and they don’t even sell an EHR to doctors directly any more. I assume this must be their white label business? I’ll have to follow up with them to get an update on their business.

Now let’s take a look at the chart for Hospital EHR vendors participating in the EHR incentive programs:
Hospital EHR Adoption - Meaningful Use Participation
This chart illustrates really well the 3 horse hospital EHR race which we’ve all known for a while. Although, given healthcare IT’s love affair with Epic (kind of like Apple in the IT world), I think some will be a bit surprised that Cerner and MEDITECH are both listed ahead of Epic. If you looked only at large hospital systems, I think the chart would look very different though.

It’s worth also mentioning the other horses in the race: McKesson, CPSI, MEDHOST, Healthland and Allscripts. They’ve all carved out their niche in the hospital space. We’ll see if they can continue to defend their territory. Hospital EHR switching is not easy.

My favorite observation from this chart versus the ambulatory chart is how well it illustrates the importance of secondary EHR vendors (the brownish gold color) in hospitals. I’ll never forget when Alan Portela of Airstrip told me that the EHR world will be a heterogenous environment. That absolutely resonated with me and this chart proves out what he said. Health systems are going to have multiple EHR vendors even if some EHR vendors would like it to be otherwise.

If you want to look at the potential disruptors in the world of EHR, I’d take a look at these secondary EHR vendors. Their foothold in hospitals provides them a really great opportunity to disrupt the status quo as we know it. Most of them won’t, but they’re all sitting on an opportunity. I’d start with the companies that make up the “Other Vendors” brownish gold bar. I bet there are some really interesting ones in that list.

I’d love to hear your observations from these charts in the comments. Anything I missed? Do you disagree with my observations? I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

EHR Partner Programs

Posted on May 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Amazing Charts just announced a new EHR partner program. This isn’t something that’s particularly new for EHR vendors. They all have lots of partners. Some have formalized them into a program like athenahealth has done with their More Disruption Please (MDP) program. Others are much more quiet about the partners they work with and how they work with them.

What’s clear to me in the EHR industry is that an EHR vendor won’t be able to do everything. There are some that like to try (See Epic), but even the largest EHR vendor isn’t going to be able to provide all the services that are needed by a healthcare organization. This is true for ambulatory and hospitals.

Since an EHR vendor won’t be able to do everything, it makes a lot of sense for an EHR vendor to have some sort of partners program. The challenge for an EHR vendor is that a partner program comes with two major expectations. First, the partner has a high quality integration with the EHR software. Second, that the partner is something that the EHR vendor has vetted.

The first challenge is mostly a challenge because most EHR vendors aren’t great at integrating with outside companies. This is a major culture shift for many EHR vendors and it will take time for them to get up to speed on these types of integrations. Plus, these integrations do take some time and investment on the part of the EHR vendor. When there’s time and investment involved, the EHR vendor starts to be much more selective about which companies they want to be working with long term. They don’t want to spend their time and money integrating with a company which none of its users will actually use.

The second challenge is that EHR users assume that an EHR partner is one that’s been vetted by the EHR vendor. Even if the EHR vendor puts all sorts of disclaimers on their partner page, the EHR vendor is still associated with their partners. The written disclaimers might help you avoid legal issues, but working with shady partners can do a lot of damage to your reputation and credibility in the marketplace. I actually think this is probably the biggest reason that EHR vendors have been reluctant to implement partner programs.

I think over time we’ll see the first problem solved as EHR vendors work to standardize their APIs for partner companies. As those APIs become more mature, we’ll see much deeper EHR integrations and the costs to an EHR vendor will drop dramatically when it comes to new partner integrations.

The second problem is much harder to solve. My best suggestion for EHR vendors is to create a platform which allows your users to help you vet potential partners. Not only can they participate in the vetting process, but it can also help you know which partners would be useful to your users. Is there anything more valuable than user driven partnerships? It also puts you in a good position with potential partners if you already have users interested in the integration.

However, an EHR vendor shouldn’t just leave potential partnership requests to their users. Many of their users don’t know of all the potential partner companies. Users are so busy dealing with their day jobs that they often don’t know of all the potential companies that could benefit their practice or hospital. Certainly you should accept user input on potential partnerships, but an EHR vendor should also seed the potential partner feedback platform with a list of potential partners as well. The mix of an EHR vendor created list together with user generated partner lists is much more powerful than one or the other.

We’re just at the beginning of companies partnering and integrating with EHR vendors. I expect that over the next 5 years an EHR vendor will be defined as much by the organizations it chooses to partner with as the features and functions it chooses to develop itself.

My Prediction for the Epic App Store

Posted on March 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I was talking with a healthcare IT vendor which really needs to integrate deeply with an EHR to be valuable. Without that integration the product is not nearly as useful for doctors. Therefore we started talking about their current EHR integration and the potential for future EHR integrations. At that point he asked me what I thought about the coming Epic App Store (officially called the Epic App Exchange).

In case you missed it, I wrote about the Epic App Store over on Hospital EMR and EHR. I cover what’s been said about the Epic App Store (not much from Epic itself) and make some predictions. However, today’s conversation solidified my predictions.

Epic has always been open to working with their customers and a tech partner to integrate something with Epic. Basically, the customer is king and so if the customer wants the integration, Epic will provide the SDK that’s needed for the integration and make it possible for the customer to do what they need. Everyone’s known that if you want to integrate with Epic, then you need to work through a customer.

With this in mind, I believe the Epic app store is a way for Epic to allow for distribution of these apps that have been created by their customers (often with a tech partner) to other Epic customers.

Basically, this is in line with Judy’s focus on the customer. Some might say that this focus is great. Hard to argue with Epic’s success. However, this approach misses out on the opportunity of the Epic app store facilitating entrepreneurial innovators to build something on top of Epic that their customers didn’t even know they wanted yet.

Epics current strategy is more in line with staying the entrenched incumbent. Real transformation comes when you provide a platform for innovation that goes beyond yourself and your customers. I hope one day Epic sees this vision and really roles out an open app store. Until then, the Epic connected customer applications are going to have a bit of a monopoly selling their add on services to Epic customers.

Never Sell Your EHR Company – According to eCW Founder

Posted on January 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently came across an interesting article in Entrepreneur magazine authored by Girish Navani, CEO and Co-founder of eClinicalWorks. If you read this site, you know doubt are familiar with the quite popular eCW EHR software. In this article Girish gives some interesting insight into the future of eCW as a company:

After grad school, I set out to create my own version of my father’s bridge. After working many odd jobs developing software, I created credit check software for an acquaintance’s business. This made him a lot of money, which prompted me to ask (perhaps naively) for a share of the profit. I had developed a very successful facet of the company – didn’t I deserve it? His response surprised me, but I will never forget it. He said, “If you build something you like, don’t sell it.”

Twenty years later, I still remember my acquaintance’s advice. For that reason, my company, eClinicalWorks is, and always will be, a privately-held company. I have no interest in selling it, regardless of any offer I may get. In addition, we don’t use investor cash or spend money we don’t have.

This is not a philosophy that is unique to eCW. #1 on Epic’s list of principles is “Do not go public.” I imagine that Judy Faulkner (CEO of Epic) has a somewhat similar philosophy to Girish. There are certainly a lot of advantages to not going public and most of them get down to control. I’ll never forget when I heard one of the Marriott children talk about their decision to stay a private company. He said that Marriott would likely be a lot bigger if they had become a public company, but they would have lost a lot of the company culture if they’d chose to do so.

I imagine this is a similar feeling that Epic and eCW share. However, there’s also some accountability that comes with being a public company as well. It’s not easy for an organization to assess the financial well being of a private company. During the golden age of EHR which we just experienced, that hasn’t been an issue for either eCW or Epic. However, as we exit this golden age of EHR that was propped up by $36 billion in government stimulus money, the financial future may be quite different.

As in most things in life, there are pros and cons to staying private or going public. It’s interesting that two of the major EHR players (eCW and Epic) have made it clear that they have no interest in ever going public. We’ll see how that plays out long term.

Top 10 Google Searches in 2014 – What Would Be Healthcare IT’s Top Searches?

Posted on December 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year Google releases it’s top trending searches in the US and the world. This list isn’t the most frequently searched terms (according to Google the most popular searches don’t change) but is a year versus year comparison of what terms were trending in 2014.

US Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
Flappy Bird
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
ISIS
Ferguson
Frozen
Ukraine

Global Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Flappy Bird
Conchita Wurst
ISIS
Frozen
Sochi Olympics

Pretty interesting look into 2014. Also amazing that a mobile app (Flappy Bird) made the list for the first time. There’s two healthcare terms: Ebola and ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I wondered what this list would look like for healthcare IT. So, I decide to take a guess at what I think would be the trending healthcare IT terms of 2014:

ICD-10 Delay
EHR Penalties
Wearables
Meaningful Use Stage 2
Epic
Obamacare
FHIR
Cerner-Siemens
HIPAA Breaches
Patient Engagement

What do you think of the list? Would you order it differently? Are there terms you think should be on the list?