“Blended” Super User Team

Posted on December 31, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At a conference I attended this Fall, I heard one person describe the “blended” super user team that they used during their EHR implementation. This is such a valuable idea for any EHR implementation. Having each areas input can really improve your probability for success. The various viewpoints will help you avoid major issues that could hijack or derail completely your EHR implementation.

The key thing you have to do with a blended super user team is to make sure you don’t demean the feedback, comments, and suggestions of anyone on the team. If you demean or belittle many of the people mentioned (technical, front desk, HIM, nurses, etc), then they’ll shut down and end up being a thorn in the side of your EHR implementation as opposed to a support. However, if you thoughtfully listen to, consider, and appreciate the feedback from all of these people, then you’ll be able to benefit from their ongoing support and insights in the process. I’ve seen both things happen and it’s not pretty for anyone when the staff feel alienated. It can get really ugly.

It turns out these “blended” super user teams are also what you need to optimize your EHR implementation as well. Sometimes that can be the same people that were part of the EHR implementation super team, but you also want to integrate other voices to the conversation as well.

Many doctors love to just pour as much work as possible on their staff. Indeed, you want to have everyone in your organization working to the highest level of their license. You also want to make sure you’re utilizing your most expensive resource (usually the doctor) in the most effective way possible. However, if you only focus on optimizing the doctors time and not the rest of the staff, that will eventually catch up with you. Once it catches up with you, the doctor will be doing work they don’t want to do, the other staff will feel overworked and no one will be happy.

You have to optimize the entire EHR spectrum to get the most value out of your EHR investment.