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Meaningful Use 2012 Predictions – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on January 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I mentioned in my last post, I’m going to take some time over the next week or so to look ahead to 2012 and discuss what I think is going to happen in the world of EMR and health IT. Since today is the regularly scheduled Meaningful Use Monday, I decided that it would be appropriate to take a look forward at Meaningful Use in 2012.

In many ways, 2012 is not going to see any major public shifts in meaningful use. Sure, we’re going to learn more about meaningful use stage 2, we’re also going to finally get out of the temporary EHR certification to the permanent EHR certification (unless something crazy happens). Although, I don’t think either of those things are going to make much real difference in the lives of doctors. Instead, there’s going to be an undercurrent of other trends that shape the future of EHR incentives and meaningful use.

Here we go:

Doctors First Hand Experiences – As Dr. Koriwchak notes in his physician perspective on meaningful use, there aren’t that many first hand experiences out there from physicians discussing their experience with meaningful use. Most of what you find out there are physicians that have been asked by their EHR vendor to be the face of that EHR vendor’s meaningful use efforts.

In 2012, whether published publicly or heard through the grapevine, doctors first hand experience with EMR implementations, EHR incentive and meaningful use are going to start filtering through the medical community. I bet Dr. Koriwchak isn’t going to be alone in his assessment that basically, I survived meaningful use, but recommend staying away. If this is the message about meaningful use that spreads, then expect more people like Dr. West opting out of Medicare or just accepting the possible EHR penalties.

Meaningful Use Audits – We know that audits of those who took EHR incentive money are coming. I think that CMS (I think they have authority over this, right?) will be generous with their audits. They won’t make it easy and fun for the person who gets audited and fails. However, I don’t think they’re going to try and make a public disgrace of those that have their meaningful use attestation audited. Doing so would set back the entire program. Instead I think CMS will try and spread the message that they’re serious about honest meaningful use attestation, but that they’ll be reasonable in their approach.

Checks Flowing Ok, so it won’t really be checks since most of the payments are going to be wired into doctors bank accounts, but you get the idea. Either way, there’s going to be a lot of doctors that are finally going to get paid for their EHR effort in 2012. This will no doubt invoke some portion of envy in their physician peers. I know I’d hate having my doctor friend getting a check and me not getting it. I felt this same way when people were buying houses and getting the government money for buying a house a couple years ago. Doctors won’t be immune to this sort of “jealousy” of their peers.

The real question is whether the money flowing will be a stronger force on EHR adoption or whether the above mentioned meaningful use pains will be stronger. As you see in my next two predictions, I think it is a split verdict.

Hospitals Capitalize – My best prediction is that hospitals will see the money flowing and be unable to resist following the money line. We’ve already largely seen this shift in hospitals IT projects. I know a number of healthcare entrepreneurs who have said that hospitals aren’t really doing any major IT projects outside of meaningful use. Hospitals will continue this trend and will likely end up taking the majority of the EHR stimulus money that’s being paid out.

Small Doctors Offices Stay Away – As I wrote about previously, most EHR incentive money is being paid to existing EHR users. In 2012 we’ll be moving past those existing EHR users and I predict that most small doctors offices will continue to sit on the sideline of EHR. The money isn’t large enough for small doctors to overcome all the work required for them to implement an EHR and the EHR penalties are a drop in the bucket for most of these doctors.

I imagine that many will be thinking, “What about the other EHR benefits beyond EHR stimulus money?” To that I’d say, you’re absolutely right. There are plenty of other benefits to having an EHR that don’t include government money for EHR. Unfortunately, the free government money has created this myopic view of the world where those other benefits have lost all their appeal.

Ok, you’re turn. Any other things you see happening with meaningful use in 2012? Any of my meaningful use predictions that you disagree with?

Random Thoughts: EMR Projects Decentralized; Problems Persist Despite ‘Solutions’

Posted on August 4, 2011 I Written By

Once in a while, I run out of Big Ideas to share and resort to a rundown of short items. This is one of those times. Often, though, that approach turns out to be more interesting than a well-thought-out commentary. (Thus, the popularity of Twitter, right?)

Speaking of Big Ideas, I’m thinking that the age of the massive EMR project may be coming to an end. You may have seen my piece in InformationWeek today about the reported end of the national EMR in England. London’s The Independent reported earlier this week that the Cameron government will announce next month that it will scrap the national strategy in favor of allowing local hospitals and trusts to make independent EMR purchasing and implementation decisions.

This news comes on the heels of a decision by the government of Ontario to give up on hopes for a single EMR for all of Canada’s most populous province.

On the other hand, here in the States, we’ve seen a lot of consolidation among healthcare providers, but I’m guessing that has more to do with administrative Accountable Care Organizations and the prospect of bundled payments than any desire to build a more unified EMR. Though, consolidation does make health information exchange somewhat easier, and that’s going to be key to earning “meaningful use” dollars beyond 2013.

On a somewhat similar note, doesn’t a headline like, “Positive Outlook for Small Practice EHR Adoption” sound like a no-brainer? I mean, isn’t that the segment of healthcare providers that historically has had the slowest adoption rates? More than anyone else, small practices—particularly small, primary care practices—are the intended target of the federal EHR incentive program. And most of the news from health IT vendors of late has been about how they are going after this long-neglected market, right? The innovation seems to be happening in ambulatory EMRs, as evidenced by DrChrono’s newly certified iPad EHR app, aimed squarely at independent physicians.

That said, vendors and publicists, please do not start inundating me with news about other EHRs getting certified. There are hundreds of certified products out there now, and I cannot and will not write about, oh, about 95 percent of them.

While you’re at it, please stop using the word “solution” as a synonym for “product” or “service.” Tech journalists hate this trite, lazy and, frankly, inaccurate term so much that I’ve been instructed by the editors of InformationWeek not to use it, except in direct quotes. In fact, I get reminded not to use it pretty much every time I’m forwarded a press release laden with news about someone’s “solution.” Solution to what? I’ve been seeing that term since I started covering health IT more than a decade ago, and I still don’t see much getting solved in healthcare. With all the “solutions” out there, you’d think that healthcare had been fixed by now.

I could get a whole lot more curmudgeonly on you, but I think I’ll stop now and await your comments.

 

CCHIT Has Become Irrelevant

Posted on June 22, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you that are relatively new to EMR and HIPAA, you might not appreciate this post as much as long time readers of EMR and HIPAA. A few years back, I admit that I was pretty harsh on CCHIT and their EHR certification. I remember one guy stopping me at a conference and after realizing who I was asked, “so what’s your issue with CCHIT?” I was happy to answer that I thought they misled the industry (doctors in particular) by saying that the CCHIT certification provided an assurance that the EHR was a good EHR. They never came outright and said this, but that’s what EMR sales people would communicate during the sales process.

In fact, EHR certification was incorrectly seen by many doctors and practice managers as the stamp of approval on an EHR being of higher quality, more effective, easier to use, and was more likely to lead to a successful EHR implementation. EHR certification today still has some of these issues. However, the fact is that the EHR certification doesn’t certify any of the great list above. If EHR certification of any kind (CCHIT or otherwise) could somehow assure: a higher implementation success rate, a better level of patient care, a higher quality user experience, a financial benefit, or any other number of quality benefits, then I’d support it wholeheartedly. The problem is that it doesn’t, and so they can’t make that assurance.

So, yes, I do take issue with an EHR certification which misleads doctors. Even if it’s the EHR salespeople that do the misleading.

I still remember the kickback I got on this post I did where I said CCHIT Was Marginalized and the post a bit later where I said that the CCHIT process was irrelevant. Today, I came across an article on CMIO with some interesting quotes from CCHIT Chair, Karen Bell. Here’s a quote from that article.

In addition, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT’s (ONC) new program has provided two new reasons for certification: proof that an EHR can do the things that the government wants it to do, and to enable eligible providers and hospitals to get EHR incentive money.

“The idea is not to assure the product will do all things that are desired for patient care, instead, the idea is to stimulate innovation,” said Bell. As a result, the program is considered a major success because more than 700 certified health IT products are now on the ONC website. “The idea was to get a lot of new products started. This is a very different reason for certification than what we began doing several years ago,” she said.

However, just because CCHIT or another ONC-Authorized Testing and Certification Body (ONC-ATCB) doesn’t test and certify for a particular ability, that doesn’t mean the EHRs don’t have it. “It’s just up to [the provider] to make sure the vendors have it,” said Bell.

I first want to applaud Karen Bell and CCHIT for finally describing the true description of what EHR provides a clinic assurance that:
1. The EHR does what the government wants
2. You are eligible for the EHR incentive money
Then, she even goes on to say that it’s up to the providers to make sure the vendors have the right capabilities for their clinic.

I imagine Karen and CCHIT would still probably say that the CCHIT “complete” EHR certification provides assurance that…< fill in the blank >, which the ONC-ATCB EHR certification doesn’t provide. The happy part for me is that even if CCHIT says this, no one is really listening to that message anymore.

Yes, CCHIT has essentially become irrelevant.

I can’t remember anyone in the past year asking me about CCHIT certification. From my experience, many people care about ONC-ATCB EHR certification, but they really couldn’t care less if it comes from CCHIT, Drummond Group, ICSA Labs, SLI Global, or InfoGuard (That’s all of them right?). Have any of you had other experiences?

I also do enjoy the irony of this post coming right after my post about differentiation of EMR companies (Jabba vs Han Solo). CCHIT is the reason that I know so much about the challenge of EHR differentiation. CCHIT’s efforts provided some very valuable (and lengthy) discussions over the past 5 years about ways to help doctors differentiate between the 300+ EHR vendors. As you can see from my comments above, I was just never satisfied with CCHIT being the differentiating factor. As you can see from my post yesterday, I’m still searching for a satisfactory alternative for differentiating EHRs. Until then, we’ll keep providing an independent voice a midst all the noise.

Meaningful Use and Certified EHR’s Impact on EMR User Interfaces

Posted on May 31, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a previous post, Anthony made this basically off the cuff comment which hit me:
“many a time, the functional requirements take priority over UI”

We see this all over the software development world. In fact, it takes a really unique company to be willing to keep UI over functionality. Ask any salesperson and they’ll tell you that new functions are easier to sell than a great UI. So, it makes sense why this happens. Unfortunate, but makes some sense.

However, this comment also had me asking myself the question, “I wonder how many meaningful use and/or EHR certification requirements caused issues with an EMR UI?

I’ve already had a few EMR demos where I said, what’s that button/function doing there. The response was, oh that was to meet meaningful use/EHR certification requirements. I’m sure many other doctors that use an EMR have seen the same thing. They wonder why an EMR has certain functions since they don’t provide better patient care. Certainly meaningful use and EHR certification is likely to blame for a lot of these possible UI issues. However, I’m sure that many more have to do with EMR software vendors that want to be all things to everyone. When you go down that path, it’s hard to maintain a great UI.

I’ve been starting to think more and more about various EMR UI. Especially with the recent launch of an EMR screenshots website. I’m grateful for the EMR vendors that have been great about sending over their screenshots. It provides an interesting view into the various EMR UI’s. I’m hoping to do some future posts where I take one or more of the screenshots and analyze some of the details. We’ll see how well that goes with an EMR screenshot.

Lessons Learned from Failed EMR Implementations

Posted on May 18, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my favorite EMR people, Matt Chase from Medtuity, wrote this interesting comment over on EMR Update.

Times are achanging. I think a recent install is a good example. The group purchased a decently well-known EMR and it failed. So they went with a second well-known EMR and it failed. Both were certified. Both had a very active sales team. The second one flew in some upper level sales people from the coast when there was talk of deinstall.

After spending half of the national debt and a looming closure of the practice, they called in a consultant. He made his recommendation. They did their demo and they asked the really hard questions– show me how to create new clinical content, show me how to create a new template, edit an existing one, how to fax a single encounter to another practitioner, then multiple encounters but not all encounters of a patient, track any lab value over time, send a reminder to a staff member, assign faxes and scans, etc, etc. Their list was very long. They did not want to hear promises and they did not want a canned demo. They wanted to see the software perform the steps that were lacking (but promised present) in their previous software.

The underlying theme here is that practices believe that certification is truly a functional seal of approval. It is not. Secondly, because certification exists and so many EMRs (>450) are certified, it implies a mature product offering– like buying a hard drive or a computer. You can expect certain functionality to be present simply because the maturity of the market would have eliminated the company. Unfortunately, just the opposite is true.

Just this week I learned that a very large practice in our town is out shopping another EMR. Yes, they have a certified one, but they certainly aren’t paperless.

Functionality will become the watchword of EMR, not certification.

That’s some interesting projections. I remember one EMR vendor telling me that a large portion of their sales were to existing EMR users. In fact, I think they said that there favorite implementations were existing users that were switching to their EMR. I also love the observation of how much better an organization is at selecting an EMR the second time they do it.

Healthcare IT Certifications that Matter

Posted on March 2, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, then you probably remember my many rants about the lack of value in EHR certification. In fact, Jim Tate asked me at HIMSS where my dislike of CCHIT came from. I think I told him that I probably got it from EMRUpdate. Certainly that’s where I learned a lot about EMR and EHR and certification in general. However, as I consider his question, my real distaste with CCHIT and quite frankly EHR certification is that it provides little to no value to doctors.

Looking back at all the discussions I had last week with those attending HIMSS, I’m really happy to say that EHR certification was almost never a discussion. Pretty much everyone either was a certified EHR or was almost done with the EHR certification process (which is in line with ONC’s desire that all EHR software be certified).

I still feel that certification provides little value, but I’m really happy to see that EHR certification has basically left the discussion. If everyone has it, then doctors don’t and won’t look to it as a way to select an EHR. I think that’s a very good thing.

As I’ve thought more about EHR certification, it’s funny that someone hasn’t come out with some healthcare IT certifications that would actually provide value to doctors and healthcare. Here’s just a few ideas off the top of my head of items that could be meaningfully certified:

  • Privacy
  • Security
  • Data portability
  • Freedom of data
  • SaaS hosting services

The interesting thing is that many of these certifications could be provided well beyond EMR software and into other healthcare IT products (and even beyond if someone so desired). Certainly the existing EHR certifications try and provides some of these items, but they’re so general and non specific that they aren’t very useful.

For example, the privacy certification could include not only that the data is encrypted but could specify which type and level of encryption is used. Plus, the certification could actually test the encryption to make sure it was implemented properly. I know some eFax vendors that would love this type of certification.

A certification that provides value wouldn’t likely be a simple pass fail certification. Maybe you do set a bar for each requirement that allows you to place a certification badge on that product. However, users should be able to dig into the details of the certification and see what was found during the process. For example, if you make sure they handle passwords correctly, a certification should provide a list of protections that are built into the software that’s being certified (ie. minimum characters, required characters, 2 factor authentication, number of failed passwords before lockout, etc).

If I weren’t so busy with my healthcare IT blog network, I’d consider doing some of this myself. Not only is it a great business, but could really provide value to healthcare. If you start it, just save me a spot as an advisor.

Permanent EHR Certification Program

Posted on January 5, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Looks like the people at HHS and ONC have been working hard. On Monday this week they published the Permanent EHR Certification Program Final rule. You can find the press release about the Permanent EHR Certification final rule on my new EMR News website (if you have other EMR news, please let me know).

You can download the full Permanent EHR Certification final rule here (Warning: PDF). Although, I must admit that I found the permanent certification fact sheet very interesting. Here’s my summary:
*Testing and certification is expected to begin under the permanent certification program on January 1, 2012 (with an exception if it’s not ready)
*NIST (through its NVLAP) will continue with accrediting organization to test EHR and to work with ONC to create test tools and procedures
*A new ONC-Approved Accreditor of ONC-AA will be chosen every 3 years
*All ONC-ATCB (those bodies certified under the temporary) must apply to be ONC-ATB (permanent certification bodies)
*ONC-ACB have to renew every 3 years
*Gap Certification will be available for future EHR certification criteria.

The most interesting part to me was that ONC will be selecting an ONC-AA (Approved Accreditor) through a competitive bid process. So, they’re going to accredit an accreditor to accredit the certifiers? I think you get the gist. I can see how ONC saves so much by only having to have to deal with one ONC-AA and not the 6 ONC-ATCB (that was in the sarcasm font if you couldn’t tell).

It does make sense to have a gap certification so that EMR vendors that are already certified don’t have to certify against all the criteria every time. I guess in theory changes an EHR vendor has made could have caused issues with their previous functions, but that’s pretty rare. Especially since their users will need it to be able to show meaningful use (which is why EHR certification has little meaning beyond it being required for EHR incentive money).

Whether you agree or disagree with EHR certification (I think you know where I stand), you have to give ONC credit for pushing out the EHR certification program so that there are plenty of certified EHR software out there to choose from. Looks like they’re well on their way to implementing the permanent EHR certification as well.

Providers Awareness of EHR Certification Bodies

Posted on October 28, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my readers recently linked me to an article from back in July that talks about providers lack of understanding of EHR certification and the possibility of EHR certification bodies beyond CCHIT. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has made it clear that it wants multiple EHR certification bodies, but that message apparently has not made it out to many physician practices. According to a survey by Burlington, Vt.-based consulting firm CapSite, 69 percent of healthcare providers are unaware that there will be alternatives to the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology in terms of certifying ambulatory EHR systems.

Additionally, 52 percent of the 850 providers surveyed incorrectly believe that CCHIT certification is a prerequisite to receiving Medicare and Medicaid bonus payments for meaningful use of EHRs. In reality, ONC will designate authorized testing and certification bodies, which then will test and certify EHRs on behalf of vendors.

As most of you know I have a real disdain for misinformation. I’m all about exposing the truth and spreading the knowledge as far as possible. So, you can imagine my reaction to providers not understanding that there are multiple EHR certification bodies and that all of the EHR certification bodies can provide doctors access to the EMR stimulus money.

The only problem is that I’m guessing that most readers of this blog already know this information. I like to think that readers of this blog are smarter and more informed than those who don’t. I was going to do a poll to see who knew what. Only problem is that reading above you’d know the answers.

Either way, if readers of this blog work to inform the people around them that there are multiple EHR certifying bodies (Drummond Group and InfoGuard with others on the way) and that it doesn’t matter which EHR certifying body you use then I think we’d have some impact for good on the EHR world!

Complete EHR Certification and Module EHR Certification

Posted on October 14, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent discussion I had, someone brought up a really interesting question about module certification to me. Obviously, proving that you use a certified EHR is quite easy if you just use one EHR software that’s a complete certified EHR based on the ARRA guidelines. Then, you can fitfully say that you use a certified EHR.

Even this isn’t that confusing if you use one complete EHR software for everything, but say ePrescribing. Of course, the ePrescribing vendor would need to be certified for those modules, but you can easily show that both are certified EHR and you use all the modules.

The questions start coming in when you start to talk about module EHR certification when you just purchase parts of a software. Let’s say you purchase only part of a certified EHR software (ie. no ePrescribing and no Patient Portal). You don’t purchase those 2 modules since you already use other software to match those needs and their certified for those modules.

The problem with this scenario is how do we know that the main EHR software that you purchased has all of the certified EHR functions if you never purchased two major components? How do we know that the ePrescribing component actually also did some other part of the EHR certification that wasn’t part of the ePrescribing module certification?

Of course, you could easily argue that it doesn’t really matter because if you’re able to show meaningful use with what you bought, then does it matter if your combined EHR software with the other modules wouldn’t technically have passed an EHR certification? It absolutely doesn’t matter. In fact, that’s exactly why EHR certification is a shameful waste of money and time. If I can meet the meaningful use guidelines using a typewriter, then who cares if the typewriter is certified or not?

Moral of the Story (since this isn’t one of my clearest posts): This whole idea of modular certification is going to be messy.

Another Possible ONC-ATCB EHR Certifying Organization

Posted on October 5, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my more interesting meetings at AAFP was with a company called SLI Global Solutions. The meeting was so interesting, because SLI Global Solutions plans to apply to become an ONC-ATCB organization very soon. This coming after the announcement of the first ONC-ATCB certified EHR from Drummond Group and CCHIT along with the announcement of InfoGard as an ONC-ATCB and Weno Healthcare’s plans to become an ONC-ATCB.

We obviously had a long conversation about the EHR certification, but suffice it to say that SLI Global Solutions is going full steam ahead to become an ONC-ATCB. It sounds like they’ve been doing a number of other certifications previously. They’ve even done some consulting work in healthcare.

When I asked SLI Global Solutions what they thought would help them to differentiate themselves from the other ONC-ATCB, one response was that they were really good at providing feedback and helping organizations through the certification process. I personally think that many EHR vendors and other healthcare organizations that need to certify for the EMR stimulus money are nervous about the unknown issues related to certification. If SLI Global Solutions can provide them a feedback loop then it could go a long way to relieving the nerves. This is the main suggestion Jim Tate makes in his post about selecting an ATCB.

I asked SLI Global Solutions how much they planned to charge for the EHR certification. Here was their response, “We have not finalized the pricing yet because we are contemplating ancillary services pre and post certification but we will likely be in the $20,000 USD ballpark.”

With SLI Global Solutions, that would make 5 ONC-ATCB and I’m guessing there are other companies like this that will become certifying bodies as well. I’m all about competition and so the more ONC-ATCB the merrier.

It does make me wonder how many ONC-ATCB the market can support. Not to mention, there’s the interesting question of whether they’re a bit late to the party. I guess time will tell.