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Without This EMR Step, You Might Never Get It Right

Posted on August 29, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

It’s not hard to find physicians and nurses who say that far from improving health care, the EMRs they use are something to work around.

Billing problems, lost productivity and even diminished quality of care are common complaints, sometimes long after the implementation kinks should have been worked out. In some cases, doctors who bought into EMRs as a way to operate more effectively and efficiently have found themselves disappointed enough to look for hospital employment, try new practice models or even close their doors, as HealthcareScene.com founder John Lynn has written.

Often the problem lies deeper than the technology, according to a recent white paper from TechSolve, a Cincinnati-based consulting group. After all, an electronic overlay does little good when it serves only to automate bad processes.

TechSolve is promoting a process-mapping approach to EMR for hospitals through its Lean Healthcare Solutions unit. It’s part of a trend toward applying the efficiency techniques of Japanese manufacturers to EMRs and other aspects of health care.

Like Toyota and other pioneers of lean, health care providers should rely on line workers to help root out waste, according to TechSolve.

“While you may be inclined to dismiss negative comments as resistance to change, staff may be aware of design issues that the design team, PI facilitator, and vendor were not,” TechSolve consultants Sue Kozlowski and Alex Jones wrote.

They offered seven steps to ensure maximum benefit from an EMR, a few of which I’ll share. I suggest downloading the full paper for a complete view.

TechSolve recommends thinking about process improvement before getting started with an EMR. Of course, if it’s too late for that, the firm and others in the space are happy to step in later, as well.

Here’s what TechSolve advises:

  • Map your current processes. This can be done with help from your process improvement team or an outside group. In some cases, it’s best to assign a team to each service line.
  • Compare current and future states. Color-coding is one way to do this, highlighting visually for staff members how their work will change.
  • Prioritize issues that affect patient care and payment timing. An “issues list” can be created and then reviewed after “go live” to make sure problems have been corrected. Also, examine how well staff members are adhering to the new processes, asking questions such as, “Where are they using work-arounds, and where have they found new capabilities in the system?”
  • Process map again. This new snapshot is the baseline going forward. It can serve as a reference for staff members when they’re in doubt and as a training tool for new hires.

We’re all looking for technology that makes our lives easier right away. But when it comes to EMRs, there’s no true turnkey solution. Making a system pay off requires investments, particularly of time, well beyond the sticker price.

Under traditional reimbursement models, though, planning is not what brings in the revenue. It’s easy enough to see why hospital employment, with guarantees of a salary and IT assistance, is becoming a more and more attractive option for physicians who want to limit expenses and risk.

Hospitals, though, have no plan B. They’ll have to marry their IT to efficient processes or else.

EMRs and Patient Satisfaction

Posted on August 7, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

When it comes to keeping patients happy, EMRs matter, a new study suggests.

More patients are logging on to access their own records – and they tend to like it, according to data from research firms Aeffect and 88 Brand Partners. About 24 percent of patients have used EMRs for tasks such as checking test results, ordering medication refills and making appointments. And 78 percent of those patients reported being satisfied with their doctors, compared with 68 percent of those who hadn’t used EMRs.

“EMR users are telling us that they are more confident in the coordination of care they’re being provided, and think more highly of their doctors, simply because of the information technology in use,” Michael McGuire, director of strategy for Chicago-based 88 Brand Partners, said in a press release.

Patient satisfaction is fast becoming a top priority in health care as it determines a growing portion of providers’ reimbursement. So far, it’s mainly been an issue for hospitals. Their patient satisfaction survey results make up 30 percent of  their quality score in Medicare’s “value-based purchasing” program, part of the Affordable Care Act. In fiscal 2013, hospitals saw 1 percent of their Medicare reimbursement put at risk based on the overall score, which also considers performance on clinical measures. The figure will increase to 2 percent by fiscal 2017. Private insurers are also starting to link payments with quality scores.

The trend is now taking hold outpatient clinics, as well. About 2 percent of primary-care doctors’ compensation is tied to patient satisfaction measures, and the figure is likely to grow in coming years, according to a recent report from the Medical Group Management Association. Specialist physicians reported, on average, that 1 percent of their salary hinged on patient satisfaction.

Patients cited several reasons for preferring that their doctors use EMRs, according to the EMR Patient Impact Study from Aeffect and 88 Brand Partners. Among them were ease of access to information and the perceived clarity and thoroughness of communication that the records systems provide. And adoption rates could be set to go higher: 52 percent of survey respondents said they aren’t using an EMR yet, but would be interested in trying one. Only 18 percent said they had no interest.

A host of other factors, such as level of attention and ease of making appointments, also factored into patient satisfaction, according to the survey of 1,000 consumers. But for doctors who have implemented EMRs, getting their patients to log on might be a simple way to create a more loyal following. In many cases, according to the survey, EMR-using patients had adopted the technology after being encouraged by a physician.

EHR Benefit – Eligibility for Pay-for-Performance

Posted on May 9, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the next installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits.

Eligibility for Pay-for-Performance
I think that this is a really scary topic for most doctors. It’s not that a doctor is afraid of being reimbursed for the way they perform. The problem with pay for performance (ACO if you prefer) is that we have no idea what that’s really going to look like. The unknown is scary and a real problem. A change as dramatic from fee for service to pay for performance is an enormous shift and we still have very little idea how that shift is going to happen.

However, as one person told me, “That train (the shift to pay for performance) has already left the station.” In fact, I was talking with the former CEO of a major EMR vendor and he suggested that the shift is going to happen a lot faster than most of us realize. If we assume that this shift is going to happen, then doctors and healthcare better be prepared.

I believe having an EMR will be the only way a clinic can participate in pay for performance.

I make this assertion, because how else are payers going to measure your performance if they don’t have the data on how you’re performing? I’ve never thought of this before, but the EMR could become the performance measurement tool for doctors. Trying to flintstone your performance in a paper world is just not going to happen. The data collected in an EMR (and possibly other software) is going to drive the performance metrics which will drive the payments.

Think about what that means to a clinic. If you don’t have an EMR, you will miss out on the pay for performance payments.

I imagine many that read this will discount the shift that’s going to happen. That’s a fair position to take, but one that I think will come back to bite you. If the shift in payments doesn’t happen, then you won’t have to worry. However, if the shift to pay for performance has left the station, then you’re going to be at a tremendous disadvantage.

Healthcare data is going to drive a lot of things in the future of healthcare. Pay for performance is one of those things. Physicians who don’t have that data available in an EMR or other electronic format are going to face stiff challenges.

EHR Benefit – Eliminate Staff

Posted on April 30, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the next installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits.

Eliminate Staff
The idea of eliminating staff is a really hard one to talk about. Often the staff in a medical office becomes a family and so it’s really hard to think about losing a staff member in order to pay for the EMR. In fact, it’s incredibly common for staff in a clinic to fear an EMR implementation because they’re afraid that their job is in jeopardy.

From my experience, it’s incredibly rare for any existing staff to lose their job during an EMR implementation.

There are two main reasons why it’s unlikely that someone will lose their job because of an EMR implementation. The first is that most healthcare organizations have a natural employee attrition. When this happens the organization can just choose to not replace the departing employee. This is one way to save money on staff without having to actually fire any employees.

The second reason that people don’t lose their job to the EMR is that those people get reassigned to new jobs. For some people this can be nearly as bad as losing a job, but for many it’s basically a shift in job responsibilities. This shift can often be welcome since the EMR implementation can free them up to do work that they always wanted to do and never were able to do before.

The areas of healthcare that I’ve seen most affected by an EMR implementation is medical records, transcription, billing, and the front desk. We’ve already written previously about transcription and EMR. The front desk and billing can be affected, but generally stays close to the same from what I’ve seen. A lot of this depends a lot on what type of staffing you had before the EMR. I have seen some organizations implement an EMR and save money on front desk and billing staff.

Medical records (or HIM if you prefer) is usually the most impacted. Certainly they still have an important place in the office for things like release of records and other records management functions. They also have to continue to deal with the legacy paper charts. However, their days of finding, organizing and filing charts are over when an EMR is put in place. In some cases the chart organizing and finding gets replaced with things like scanning into the EMR. In other cases, there isn’t as many medical records staff needed.

Many who are reading this post are probably balking at the idea of eliminating staff being a benefit of an EMR implementation. They’d no doubt point to the EHR backlash that we see from many doctors who complain that an EMR makes them much slower and takes up too much time. This is an important item to consider when evaluating the benefits of an EMR in your organization. It’s not much of a benefit to save other staff cost if the doctor spends twice as much time per patient.

However, on the other side of the coin is those doctors who swear by the efficiency their EMR provides them. I’ll never forget this older OB/GYN I met who told me he would NEVER use an EMR. Two years later that same OB/GYN was proclaiming his love of EMR. He described how he wouldn’t be able to see nearly as many patients as he did each day without the EMR. He acknowledged the slow down that occurred when they first implemented the EMR, but once they adapted to the EMR workflow they were able to see most patients.

No doubt Eliminating Staff can be a mixed EMR benefit basket depending on your unique situation. Although, this is true with almost every EMR benefit we’ll cover in this series. This can be a tremendous benefit of EMR or it can also be an expense as you find you need to hire more staff.

Related Whitepaper:
Getting Lean with Your Practice: Five Tips for Improving Provider Productivity with an EHR
One of the major reasons that health care providers resist implementing an electronic health record (EHR) system is the belief that using it will slow them down, reducing the number of patients they can see and therefore reducing practice revenue. In fact, an EHR that is designed around an efficient workflow can enable providers to work faster and more efficiently. “Lean” methodologies, originally introduced by Toyota, have recently been used by health care providers such as Massachusetts General Hospital, ThedaCare, and Beth Israel Hospital (Boston) to streamline patient workflow. By understanding and measuring the workflow, health care providers can determine best practices, which will ultimately enable them to achieve the level of efficiency they desire.

Download Whitepaper or see More EMR and Health IT Whitepapers

EHR Benefit – Space Savings

Posted on January 30, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the next installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits.

Space Savings
I’ve heard many clinics use the space savings as a great way to justify the cost of their EHR. This works better in the small physician office market than it does in the hospital market, but the principles are similar. However, the scale is different.

The obvious space savings is the storage of all the paper charts. While many clinics are quite creative in how they’ve stored paper charts (see the walls around the front desk of many clinics), the most common storage is a chart room dedicated to the storage of all the paper charts. Each state has its own requirements for the retention of paper charts, but its usually somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 years. 6 years of paper charts amounts to a lot of storage space. Plus, many doctors I know keep their paper charts well beyond the required retention period (the liability of doing so is a different discussion).

There are many different approaches to dealing with your paper charts during an EHR implementation. Many continue referencing and pulling the paper chart, but just start any future documentation in the EHR. Others scan the patient charts for the following day’s appointments. Others choose to only scan parts of the paper chart similar to how they use to “thin” the paper charts. In each of these situations, the space savings will start to accrue over time, but you won’t experience a big space opening up right away.

One way that some clinics gain space is by moving the charts from a very accessible place to one less accessible. As you move to EMR, there isn’t as much of a need to access the old paper charts and so you can often optimize your space in a way to free up the previous paper chart storage space and move the paper charts to a different space in your office.

Another option many clinics are doing is outsourcing the scanning of all their old paper charts to an outside company. While not the topic of this post, the cost and quality of such outsourced scanning has made it a really attractive option for many clinics. Many chart scanning companies will even do clinical data abstraction as I’ve written about before. In this case, all of your paper charts get scanned into digital form and you no longer have any paper charts storage needed at your office. It’s always amazing to see an entire room full of paper charts sitting on a little hard drive.

I’ve heard of clinics use the previous chart storage space in a variety of ways. The most interesting is when the previous chart storage space is turned into an exam room(s). This extra exam room can allow a clinic to see more patients or even hire another provider who sees patients in their clinic. In this current fee for service environment, that translates directly to dollar signs for the clinic. If you can achieve this during your EHR implementation, it’s a great way to justify the cost of the EHR and is a tremendous financial benefit to consider.

In other cases, the chart room is turned into an office for the billing staff, practice manager, nurses, or doctor. Doing so can’t easily translate to a specific dollar amount, but can also lead to valuable benefits such as employee satisfaction, quality of care, quality of billing, etc.

Saving space isn’t always a result of implementing an EHR, but it can be in many EHR implementations. So, consider how the chart storage space can benefit your clinic.

EHR Benefit – Transcription Costs Savings

Posted on January 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the next installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits.

Transcription Costs Savings
When I first writing about EMR (yes, it was only called EMR at the time), this was probably the biggest reason that doctors gave for implementing an EMR in their office. Doctors looked at their transcription costs and saw EMR as a great way to replace those transcription costs. Or at least the doctors could use the transcription cost savings to pay for the EMR.

This has proven true for many doctors and no doubt was the financial mechanism that many practices used to go electronic. In fact, I always wondered if the transcription world was on a final death march thanks to EMR. My view of transcription has greatly evolved over the years. In fact, I think we’re seeing a resurgence of transcription in healthcare.

The reason for the renewed interest in transcription is because a large number of providers that start using EHR are tired and overwhelmed by the “number of clicks” that are required by an EHR. When a doctor reaches this point, there immediate reaction is “EMR is so much slower than transcription” or the related “I miss my transcription.”

I always found EMRs that facilitated transcription a little odd, but considering the above trend they might be well positioned to capitalize on those doctors who want to use transcription with their EHR. Plus, the transcription industry is shifting as well. They’re moving quickly away from just being simple transcriptionists to embracing coding and other ways to assist in the clinical documentation process. Considering the complexity of ICD-10, this might be an interesting opportunity.

What does seem clear is that doctors will be more and more interested in ways to streamline the EMR documentation process. I won’t be surprised if many doctors choose transcription as a way to accomplish this goal. Although, I’m not sure this will be the case with new doctors. Transcription has its own learning curve and I don’t see many new doctors who don’t have transcription experience going that direction.

In the end, it’s hard to really say whether transcription cost savings is an EHR benefit. In many cases it could be. Certainly the shrinking transcription industry would agree that many doctors are saving money on their transcription costs. Although, it depends on the clinic and whether they cut out their transcription when they implement their EHR. While we might see some return to transcription, I expect that long term the transcription industry will need to evolve or die as most next generation doctors won’t even consider the idea of transcription.

EHR Benefit – Accessibility of Charts

Posted on January 10, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time for the second installment in my series of posts looking at the long list of EHR benefits. In case you missed the first post, go and check out the EHR benefit of legible notes.

Accessibility of Charts
The second EHR benefit is similar to the Legibility of Notes benefit in that it is easily forgotten as a benefit to EHR and it can be hard to quantify the value of the benefit in dollar amounts. Plus, it is really easy to see how nice accessible charts are to an organization.

There are a number of ways to look at the EHR benefit of accessible charts. The most obvious one is when you think about the number of times a chart has gone missing in a clinic. In most cases, the chart isn’t really missing. It’s in the clinic somewhere, but no one can find it. Remember all those special places that a chart could hide: exam room, physician’s desk, front desk, nurse’s desk, lab sign off box, physician’s car, hospital, physician’s home, etc etc etc. Oh yes, I didn’t even mention HIM not being able to find the chart because someone (probably someone other than HIM) misfiled the paper chart.

I’m sure most HIM people who read this will have a visceral reaction. I’m sure many are likely thinking, “But we do an amazing job keeping track of all those paper charts.” I agree with them 100%. A good HIM person has done an amazing job keeping track of paper charts. It would be 100 times worse if they weren’t there. The problem is that if a dozen people are using the paper chart, the reality is that charts are going to go missing.

Now think about the concept when it comes to EHR. None of those lost chart locations exist. The nurse can’t accidentally take the chart and forget to file it. The doctor can’t forget the chart at home or in his car. No one can misfile the chart.

Think about it. An EHR solves 100% of the problem of missing paper charts.

Besides misplaced paper charts, the idea of chart accessibility is an important one when you consider the idea of accessing an EHR remotely. Even if you use a less than ideal remote desktop solution, a physician can access an EHR anywhere they have an internet connection. For web based EHR, you get exactly the same experience accessing the EHR remotely as you would in the office.

I’ve heard horror stories (at least their pretty horrible to me) of doctors getting late night patient calls which require them to get dressed, go into the office, open the medical records room to access a patient chart. With an EHR, that same workflow has the doctor booting his computer and logging into the EHR. This doesn’t apply to all doctors, but for those that do it’s a dramatic difference.

The biggest fear I’ve heard from doctors in this regard is they often equate chart accessibility with their accessibility. The argument goes that if they can access the chart 24/7, that it also means they have to work 24/7. I think this is a myth that doesn’t match most realities. Just because you had a key to your office and could go and work on paper charts 24/7 doesn’t mean you had to do it. The same is true with remote access to EHR. You choose when is appropriate and important to access and work on the EHR and when not to do so.

The key difference between EHR and paper charts is that when you do want to access a patient’s record remotely you have that option available to you. That doesn’t mean you always have to do so, but it is nice to have that option available.

When talking about EHR accessibility, I think also about the landscape of connected mobile devices (smart phones, tablets, etc). All of these devices are connected to the internet at all times and could provide a doctor access to their EHR almost anywhere in the world. Try doing that with paper.

The problem here is that most EHR don’t do well on mobile devices. Remote desktop from a smart phone or tablet works, but is a pretty terrible user experience. A native mobile app provides a much better experience for users, but we’re still in the early days of EHR mobile app development. As this matures, the accessibility of charts will become an even bigger EHR benefit.

EHR Benefit – Legibility of Notes

Posted on December 12, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve hinted for a little while that I was going to start a series of posts talking about the various benefits of using an EHR. I think this is an important subject worth discussing in greater detail. I hope that this series of posts will also help us move past meaningful use of an EHR for the government EHR money and explore all the other reasons why healthcare should fully adopt an EHR.

Back when I first started blogging about EMR software (It was 2005, before the term EHR came to be), I made this list of EMR and EHR benefits over paper charts. I’ll be using that list as the starting point for this series of EHR Benefit posts. I love the first paragraph on that page (which I likely haven’t touched since 2005):

This list is just a starting point to list off all the possible benefits of having an EMR or EHR. Probably a poor one, but a start nonetheless. My plan is for this list to grow over time as I think of new benefits or as people suggest things I’ve most certainly missed. Also, I think that most people often focus too much on the financial benefits of an EMR and so hopefully this list will include financial and other benefits beyond the financial implications.

The list definitely did grow, but I guess I never got around to updating the intro paragraph. Although, I am pleased to see that even back in 2005 I was as interested in the non-financial benefits of EHR. Certainly the financial benefits of EHR are incredibly important, but far too many people don’t take into account the other non-financial benefits in their analysis of EHR benefits. It’s just too hard for many to try and compare or put a value on the non-financial benefits of EHR. We’ll try to point these benefits out just the same.

Now for the first EHR benefit on the list:

Legibility of Notes
I’m really glad to start with an EHR benefit that everyone can understand with little explanation. Poor medical handwriting has been a running challenge in healthcare for as long as we’ve been documenting patient visits. I did a quick search on Google for “write like a doctor” and it had about 321 million results. That’s quite pervasive.

I can’t think of anyone that would argue that healthcare doesn’t have a challenge reading physician’s handwriting. No doubt there are plenty of exceptions to this, but even those with beautiful handwriting still have to read other doctors’ handwriting from their own office or from other doctors’ notes that get sent to their office. It’s great to have the notes, but if you can’t read them then what’s the point.

While certainly illegible handwriting is a major problem in the office, it also extends outside the office as well. Think of all the times pharmacists have had to call a doctor to clarify the prescription a patient brought in. Even worse than that is the number of times the pharmacist misread a script because a doctor’s handwriting is illegible. This becomes a non-issue in an electronic world where the prescription is either printed or ePrescribed.

Of course, none of this is new territory. Every doctor understands these benefits better than I’ve explained here. However, far too often when we think about implementing an EHR, we forget about these simple and easy to understand benefits. How much time is saved in your clinic by being able to read the handwriting in the chart? How much time is saved in healthcare when referrals come in an easy to read, legible format? How much time and how many lives are saved by pharmacists getting the proper prescription to the patient? All of these are hard measures to quantify, but they are real, tangible benefits of an EHR.

I won’t mislead you into thinking the shift from paper charts to EHR solves all the legibility problems. Many template driven EHR software that creates a mass of mostly irrelevant data can be just as hard to decipher as the hieroglyphic handwriting of some doctors. However, I’ve seen a tidal wave of push back against these documentation approaches and I think we’re getting better. I think the shift to quality of care reimbursement versus procedure based reimbursement will help this to go away as well.

There are other things a clinic leaves behind with paper charts. I’ve heard many tell me how many times they looked at the handwriting to recognize who had documented something in a paper chart. Certainly that same info is available in an EHR, but you do lose the instant recognition of who charted what in the chart.

Despite not being able to put a nice dollar value on the Legibility of Notes, it’s certainly an EHR benefit that can’t be forgotten. It’s very easy to adopt an EHR and take this for granted.

A Child’s View of EMR, EMR Tech Needs, and Typeface for Doctors

Posted on September 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Can you believe summer is over? It’s September and the cool weather of Fall is just around the corner (I hope). Plus, that means health IT conference season is close as well. Why do they have to put all the conferences all together at the same time. I could travel to a health IT conference every single day in October. That’s crazy. I’d prefer just one a month. I wonder who could fix that.

Enough of that. This weekend’s EMR Twitter roundup is a really interesting one that includes a number of images which are really memorable. Plus, I think you’ll even find a little humor in this roundup.


This makes me want to do the same thing with my child. They love drawing and I wonder how they’d draw it. Plus, they’ve been to the doctor enough they could probably do it without my even going in. I wonder if they’d draw the laptop in or not. With that said, this picture will resonate with me for a while. At least the picture was colorful and a nice place for a child.


I think that’s the order I’ve seen most doctors go when it comes to EMR technology. In the ambulatory environment they usually want a laptop. A desktop in the office for the more in depth work they do in the EMR. Plus, smart phones are still an afterthought. Mostly because most EHR software doesn’t work too well on a smartphone. Even an iPad is so so with EMR software today.


This image gave me a good laugh. I’m sure many doctors get tired of the physician handwriting jokes. Interestingly enough, I’ve never heard of handwriting issues from those using an EHR.

10 Ways to Meaningful EHR Use for Doctors

Posted on August 31, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Rob Lamberts, MD offered 10 ways to make an EHR meaningful for doctors on the KevinMD blog. It’s a really interesting list that’s worth sharing:

1. Require all visits to have a simple summary.

2. Allow coding gibberish to be hidden.

3. Require all ancillary reports to be available to the patient.

4. Require integration with a comprehensive and unified patient calendar.

5. Put most of the chart in the hands of the patient.

6. Pay for e-visits and make them simple for all involved.

7. Allow e-prescription of all controlled drugs.

8. Require patients’ records to be easily searchable.

9. Standardize database nomenclature and decentralize it.

10. Outlaw faxing.

That’s a pretty compelling list. What do you think of his list? Are there things you’d add to it?