Early Attestation Results: Some Observations – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on August 8, 2011 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

At last week’s HIT Policy Committee meeting, Robert Tagalicod, (the new director of the Office of E-Health Standards & Services), presented an analysis of the attestation experience to-date [See John’s previous Meaningful Use Details post for the slides and report]. The results lend themselves to some interesting observations—admittedly preliminary findings, but revealing nonetheless: 

  • The average performance levels were quite high—on those measures that have thresholds to be met, providers attested to results considerably above the level required for successful accomplishment. This is a positive sign that once providers commit to an EHR and to meaningful use, they try to use the EHR on a routine basis, not just to satisfy the minimum requirements. True, these initial attesters represent early EHR adopters who have had time to become successful EHR users, but hopefully this trend will be sustained.
  • Care coordination measures seem to present a challenge for many providers—the most commonly deferred (i.e., not selected) menu measures were medication reconciliation and summary of care at transitions.
  • Very few providers were actually able to conduct a test of their ability to electronically submit syndromic surveillance information to public health agencies or submit immunization data to registries (5% and 28% of attesters, respectively). Not surprisingly, most EPs either excluded or deferred these public health measures

Of the 2,383 EPs that attested, 137 were unsuccessful. I’d be interested to know where they stumbled and if they will succeed in another reporting period.