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Are Retiring Physicians Eligible for Incentives? – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on February 20, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

As the industry anxiously anticipates the Proposed Rule for Stage 2 meaningful use—likely expected during HIMSS this week—many providers are still struggling to understand meaningful use Stage 1. So while we wait for the impending news story to break, let me address another question that was recently posed by a reader. 

Q: Can a physician attest and earn a Medicare EHR incentive for his second reporting year if he will be retiring in the middle of the year? 

A: To my surprise, this situation is not explicitly addressed in the regulations. One would think that a physician who works full time for part of the year would be just as eligible as one who works part time for the full year. The retiring physician, however, faces two obstacles: 1) The regulations require that an EP report for an entire calendar year after receiving a first meaningful use payment. 2) The EP must have an active enrollment record in PECOS (Medicare) to be eligible to attest—if he retires and withdraws from Medicare, he would no longer have active status. These factors suggest that a retiring physician is not eligible for an incentive (unless, of course, he times his retirement for the end of the year!)

In lieu of a definitive answer to the question, however, I offer the following food for thought: 1) Couldn’t the retiring physician simply wait until December 31 to attest and then report on the full calendar year? 2) What if he simply postpones surrendering his PECOS enrollment until the end of the year? (According to a local Medicare contractor, nothing prohibits him from doing that even though he would no longer be submitting claims.) If there are countervailing reasons not to do this that readers are aware of—and there may well be—please share your insights by commenting below. 

(Note: This is not an issue for retiring physicians in their first incentive year since they attest immediately upon the conclusion of their 90-day reporting period.)

More Meaningful Use Stage 1 Numbers from 2011

Posted on February 3, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a previous Meaningful Use Monday we wrote about a bunch of the Meaningful Use 2011 statistics that were put out by ONC and CMS. I know that my readers love statistics and information about Meaningful Use. Carl Bergman sent me a PDF file that contained some really interesting data on Meaningful Use stage 1 in 2011. The first pages we basically covered in the previous post, but starting on about page 10 or so there are some more detailed numbers.

Take a look at let us know which numbers you find interesting and/or unique.


Meaningful Use Numbers from 2011 and Looking Towards 2012 – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on January 16, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HITECH Answers recently posted a great post that gives a run down of the EHR Incentive program’s progress in 2011. Here’s their list with my own analysis and commentary of each point.

123,921 Eligible Professionals have registered for EHR Incentives, 15,255 have successfully attested to meaningful use in the Medicare program.
This seems like such a HUGE difference in numbers. That’s just over 12% of Eligible Professionals that registered attested to meaningful use. Does this mean that we’re going to see a tidal wave of meaningful use attestation in 2012? Possibly.

I believe that we’ll see more eligible professionals attesting to meaningful use in 2012. However, the question is how many of those other 108,666 will attest to meaningful use in 2012 and how many are like the Happy EMR Doctor who just registered to see the MU process. I wonder how many first hand meaningful use experiences by doctors will scare doctors away from MU attestation.

3.077 Eligible Hospitals have registered EHR Incentives and 604 of those have successfully attested to meaningful use.
This is almost 20% of hospitals that have registered that have attested to meaningful use. It’s not surprising that this number is a lot higher than eligible professionals. I still believe that the wave of meaningful use attestation will come from these other 2473 hospitals and probably many more that still haven’t registered. I haven’t seen a good number of how many hospitals are in the US. Does anyone know that number? The EHR incentive money that goes to hospitals will dwarf those of eligible professionals.

$2,533,689,145 has been paid out in Medicare and Medicaid Incentives.
$2.5 billion sent out in 2011. I just went back to the first time I tagged meaningful use on this site on April 3, 2009 (coincidentally I have 19 pages of 10 posts each tagged with Meaningful Use). Amazing to think that it’s taken basically 3 years to spend $2.5 billion on EHR.

277 hospitals have received payments under both Medicare and Medicaid and of those 12 were CAHs.
That’s about half of the hospitals that have attested to meaningful use under Medicare are also getting the Medicaid EHR incentive money as well.

22% of eligible professionals that have been paid EHR incentives are Family Practitioners and 20% are Internal Medicine.
I must admit that I would have thought that the percentage of family doctors that got paid EHR incentive money would have been a lot higher. I guess when you have so many other specialty areas I shouldn’t be that surprised. I also wonder why the internal medicine number is so high. These numbers actually make me believe that a lot of family practice doctors are sitting out when it comes to meaningful use.

41 States Medicaid programs were open for registration. Two additional States launched in January of 2012.
I wonder what’s holding back the other 7 states. From what I’ve seen all the states will eventually get there.

More than 1500 EHR products have been certified by ONC-ATCBs.
That’s a lot of EHR software. I still put the EHR company list at about 300 EHR vendors. 1500 includes multiple versions of the same software, partial EHR certification for products like data warehouses, ePrescribing, etc. The best thing that’s come from the ONC-ATCB program is that it has made EHR certification basically irrelevant in the EHR selection process. Every EHR vendor is certified now. This is much better than the false assurances that EHR certification provided before. I still dislike what EHR certification has done to the industry, but at least it’s not misleading doctors the same way it was before.