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Will Your EHR Vendor Be Around in 5 Years?

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The following is a guest post by Angela Carter, marketing manager at ChartLogic.
Angela Carter
A major concern physicians have dealt with over the past 10–15 years has been choosing the right EHR solution for their practice. With the rise and fall of numerous electronic health record companies, that concern has evolved to whether a chosen EHR will still be in business five years from now.

According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), there are over 900 EHR vendors currently on the market, many of whom offer more than one product. In some ways, the huge number of EHR choices has been a good thing for healthcare; it has forced vendors to be more innovative and to cater to the needs of their users. However, the market can’t possibly sustain this many similar projects for long. Eventually, small vendors will be swallowed up by larger vendors and many others will simply go out of business.

So how do you know if your EHR vendor will survive the EHR purge that has already started? Of course there is no way of knowing for sure, but below are a few questions you can ask yourself that will give you a good idea of your EHR’s future.

1. How long has the vendor been in business?

Past performance is usually a good measuring stick for the future. Hundreds of vendors were born after the HITECH Act was passed in 2009, which means that most EHR vendors are still relatively new. Newer EHR companies aren’t necessarily a bad thing—some of them are actually better than some of the legacy systems that have been around for decades—but be wary of any company that doesn’t have the years in business to back it up. A vendor that has already proven it has weathered the EHR storms for 10–15 years will be much more likely to survive current and future challenges than the new, promising EHRs.

Don’t just look at how long the vendor has been in business, though. Research the vendor’s track record as well. If your vendor has a high retention rate—90 percent or higher—then you’re in good company.

2. How usable is the EHR?

For years, doctors put up with EHRs that didn’t meld with their workflow, but that tolerance is coming to an end. Black Book Rankings called 2013 “The Year of the Great EHR Switch” because most EHR implementations happened in practices that were on their second or third EHR. The reason for this shift? Usability. Eighty-seven percent of doctors cited usability as their primary complaint about EHRs. (Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/7/prweb10926499.htm)

For some reason it took many years for usability of EHR systems to catch on, but now that it has, the difficult-to-use systems will have a difficult time holding on to customers. Point-and-click EHRs have never been popular among physicians, especially those who see 50+ patients a day. EHRs that utilize voice technology, though, are growing in popularity. It is highly unlikely that any EHR system will cater 100 percent to a physician’s needs and preferences, but voice offers much more flexibility than traditional point-and-click systems do, not to mention voice-driven systems are more likely to follow the workflow physicians already use.

3. How well does your vendor understand your specialty?

The reason the industry hasn’t settled on just a couple of vendors by now is because workflow among different specialties varies so widely. Physicians need vendors that are very good at their specialty, not those that claim to answer to the needs of all physicians. A vendor that dedicates itself to producing and improving capabilities that align with your specific needs will take much better care of you. Not only that, but they will be more able to evolve with you as technological demands change, giving the company more stability in a shaky market.

4. How’s the support?

Never underestimate the power of a good support team. Most EHRs aren’t designed to work flawlessly fresh out of the box; you need adequate training and ongoing support, too. A recent Software Advice survey revealed that about 60 percent of respondents reported “learning to use the system” as a one of the main challenges with their EHR, even more challenging than achieving meaningful use or finding costs to support the system. (source: http://www.softwareadvice.com/medical/userview/ehr-survey/)

As a business metric, support may be even more powerful than usability, especially since federal regulations keep tightening, limiting the freedom to change certain aspects of an EHR. A vendor that communicates with its customers regularly will stand out.

5. Is the vendor ready for meaningful use stage 2? ICD-10?

Over a thousand vendors certified for meaningful use the first time around. Less than 40 of those vendors have received complete ambulatory certification required for 2014. Add ICD-10 to the mix and very few vendors will be able to keep up with these increasingly difficult technological advancements. Vendors that don’t have a plan already in place regarding how they will re-certify for meaningful use and be ICD-10 compliant will be among the first to go.

A vendor that scores well in each of the five questions above will most likely have what it takes to make it through the next five years.

Angela Carter is a marketing manager at ChartLogic, an EHR for orthopedists, ENT doctors, and other specialists. In addition to managing all of the company’s content, she writes regular blog posts for various health IT sites. She is also the associate editor for Utah Technology Magazine, a start-up magazine that aims to tell the tech story happening in Utah.

January 10, 2014 I Written By

Thankful for Amazing Support

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I’m so excited. Things are coming together for a really big announcement next Monday. I’m really excited about what we’ve put together and I think many readers will be interested in it as well. I’ve leaked the idea a little bit on Twitter, but I should be able to announce a lot more details next Monday. Watch for that next week.

Until then, it seems really appropriate at this time of Thanks to take a few seconds to recognize the many sponsors who support the work we do here at EMR and HIPAA. It’s been a really great 6 months and we’ve received a lot of amazing support. In fact, I’m really pleased by the variety of healthcare IT companies that are supporting the work we do.

I hope you’ll take a second to look over these new and renewing sponsors to see if they can help you solve some of your pressing issues.

New Sponsors
interfaceMD – This EHR company is quite unique. Rather than try and explain their unique approach to EHR and EHR implementation, take a second and watch this video interview I did with interfaceMD CEO Joel Kanick. I think many of the things he shares will resonate with small practices out there. Joel and interfaceMD have taken a really holistic approach to implementing an EHR and all the IT in between. Check them out if you want to see what I mean.

Proven Backup – One of the biggest risks of any EHR is not having a proper backup. Unfortunately, many don’t pay attention to their backup plans until it’s too late. The best way I’ve seen to solve this is to do a mock situation where your database is corrupt. What will it take you to restore from backup? Do you have a backup that works? The beauty is that there are relatively inexpensive backup offerings like the one from Proven Backup. Done correctly, your EHR backup can be much more robust and less risky than paper ever could be.

Colocation America – One of the major features of all healthcare IT is the need for some sort of hosting. Colocation America offers a wide variety of hosting options for applications and organizations of all sizes. As a past server admin and data center manager myself, I can’t ever imagine building my own data center again. The service a hosting company like Colocation America provides is impossible for small organizations to build on their own and is likely out of reach for even the largest organizations.

HealthFusion – Some might not recognize this name, but might be more familiar with HealthFusion’s MediTouch EHR software. If you want to find out what’s unique about Health Fusion, check out this interview with HealthFusion’s Co-Founder and CEO. I was really interested with HealthFusion’s efforts to incorporate the native iPad interface in their EHR very early on. I don’t know many other EHR vendors who can say that “every EHR function that can be performed on the desktop can also be performed on the iPad.”

Doc Halo – HIPAA secure texting is starting to hit healthcare in a really big way. Many in healthcare have found the value of a simple text message communication. However, every healthcare compliance department is scared about the HIPAA implications of such text messages. The answer to this is to empower the end users to have the simplicity of a text message, but done on a secure platform like Doc Halo. If you want to learn more, the Doc Halo CEO has been contributing a number of blog posts on the subject as well.

gMed – If you are a gastroenterologist, then you need to take a look at gMed’s EHR solution. I’ve always been a fan of the specialty specific EHR software. They can offer a unique experience that gets washed over by most of the EHR vendors who want to apply a one size fits all approach to EHR. If you’re interested in Gastroenterology, you’ll want to check out this excellent whitepaper on the Future of Gastroenterology.

The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company) – Many of you may recognize this company since they’ve been doing a monthly series of blog posts called Breakaway Thinking. You can expect a lot more amazing content on EMR and HIPAA from the talented people at The Breakaway Group. They have a lot of first hand experience with EHR training and ICD-10 training. Being on the front lines provides them some really interesting insight into the industry.

Renewing Sponsors
I’m always thankful for the ongoing support of our renewing sponsors. So, a big thanks to all of the companies listed below for renewing their support of us. It’s great to look over so many of these companies who have been supporting us for so many years. Here’s to many more years working together.
Ambir – Advertising since 1/2010
Amazing Charts – Advertising since 5/2011
Cerner – Advertising since 9/2011
simplifyMD – Advertising since 9/2012
Canon – Advertising since 10/2012

Look for the really big announcement next Monday.

December 2, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Great EMR and HIPAA Supporters

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We have a number of really big announcements we’re going to make in the next month. One of them I can’t really mention, but the other is a Healthcare Marketing and PR Focused conference in Las Vegas (of course, since I live in Vegas). I’ve floated this conference idea to a couple healthcare marketers and their response has been nothing short of amazing. I think they’re really excited to go to a conference which helps them do their jobs versus going to conferences to market their company. Watch for the official announcement to come out soon. Plus, the other announcement I can’t talk about is even more exciting for the network.

With that said, Healthcare Scene (which EMR and HIPAA is a part) is doing really well. We’re well over 12 million pageviews and over 6500 blog posts since we started blogging on EMR back in 2005. I want to take a second to thank all those organizations that support what we do. Some have just started working with us and then there are many who have been supporting us for a lot of years. Either way, their support is always appreciated.

If you enjoy the content we create, I hope you’ll take a second to check out these EMR and HIPAA supporters. Their support keeps the lights on.

New Supporters
interfaceMD – One of the things I like about how interfaceMD looks at the EHR market is that each installation needs some custom work to match the unique needs of a doctors office. To use the oft quoted phrase, if you’ve seen one clinic, you’ve seen ONE clinic. I’ll be doing a G+ Hangout with the interfaceMD President and CEO, Joel Kanick where I’m sure we’ll explore this topic more.

DrChrono – A lot of EHR vendors talk about their iPad EHR application, but there are few EHR vendors that have created an iPad first EHR application. That’s the way DrChrono has approached the development of their EHR. Plus, they offer a free version where you can give their EHR a test drive before you buy. Just download the drchrono EHR on your iPad and try it out.

gMed – I’ve often written about the value of specialty doctors purchasing a specialty specific EHR. If you’re looking for a Gastroenterology EHR, then you should check out gMed. Plus, they’ve even put out this free whitepaper called Independent Gastroenterology: A Look into the Future. It’s a good example of their deep understanding of gastroenterology.

The Breakaway Group (A Xerox company) – This company takes a really unique approach to EHR and ICD-10 training. Plus, I love that they have deep roots in researching the most effective leaning techniques which they then use to refine their product. So, I’m excited to have them contributing to a monthly series of blog posts that we’re calling the Breakaway Thinking Blog Series.

GNAX Health – As healthcare IT continues to be implemented, I’m seeing more and more organizations looking at their disaster recovery plans using an external data center. GNAX has a whitepaper called Healthcare IT Disaster Recovery: 9 Steps to Help Target a Reliable DR Datacenter where they cover some of the challenges associated with finding the right disaster recovery data center. The time to prepare the disaster recovery is now and now when the hurricane is bearing down.

Renewing Supporters
These organizations have renewed their support of EMR and HIPAA. It’s always appreciated to see these companies renew year after year.
Ambir – Advertising since 1/2010
Amazing Charts – Advertising since 5/2011
simplifyMD – Advertising since 9/2012
Canon – Advertising since 10/2012
Xerox – Advertising since 2/2013

Thanks for reading!

October 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

The EMRs You Don’t Hear About

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The best-known EMRs got that way because they target the masses. About a third of the country’s physicians focus on primary care, with the remainder fragmented across dozens of specialties and subspecialties. It’s easy to see, then, why the major EMRs are primary-care centric.

For specialists, the solution is often to use a general EMR and tailor it, with templates and other features, for the field’s common diagnoses and treatments, as well as its workflow. The question is whether the customization is enough. After all, the practice of, say, a nephrologist, who focuses on kidney ailments, doesn’t look much like that of the average family practitioner. And that’s not even considering other health care providers, such as optometrists, who aren’t MDs but who are eligible for meaningful use incentives all the same.

Some providers, then, choose a single-specialty EMR. Sometimes it’s a specific product from a larger health IT company. In other cases, it’s software from a vendor operating in but one niche.

Here are a few specialties with very specific practice patterns and the vendors who serve them with EMRs and practice-management software.

  • Nephrology. Physicians in this specialty deal with conditions and treatments such as kidney stones, hypertension, renal biopsy and transplant. A major part of the workflow is dialysis. One vendor catering to this specialty is Denver-based Falcon, which claims that its electronic notes transfer feature can “bridge the gap between your office EMR and dialysis centers.”
  • Eye care. Care in this field is provided by ophthalmologists, optometrists and opticians. Diagnosis and treatment rely on equipment and techniques unlike those found anywhere else in medicine. If you’ve ever had your eyes dilated, you know this is true. Hillsboro, Ore.-based First Insight created MaximEyes with eye care’s peculiar workflows in mind.
  • Gastroenterology. More commonly referred to as Gastro or GI. Florida based gMed (Full Disclosure: gMed advertises on this site) focuses on GI practices with GI specific problem forms, order sets, history forms, and Endoscopy reports to name a few. Plus, they are the only EHR which reports directly to the AGA registry.
  • Podiatry. These specialists of the foot train in their own schools. Bunions, gout and diabetic complications are among the problems they treat with therapies ranging from shoe inserts to surgery. DOX Podiatry, based in Arizona, concentrates on this field, providing clinical, scheduling and billing and collections modules. Its clinical component starts with a graphic of a foot, allowing the podiatrist to specify the problem area and tissue type. DOX claims that the software can eliminate the need to type reports.
  • Addiction. Chemical dependency and behavioral health providers include a variety of specialists, including psychiatrists, psychologists and counselors. Documentation in the field must account for outpatient, inpatient and residential services and for individual and group counseling sessions. Buffalo, N.Y.-based Celerity addresses the heavily regulated industry with its CAM solution, developed by a clinical director in the field.
  • Oral Surgery. This field is a dental specialty focused on problems of the hard and soft tissues of the mouth, jaws, face and neck. As such, an oral-surgery EMR needs heavy-duty support for the anatomy in play. DSN Software, based in Centralia, Wash., sells Oral Surgery-Exec for this group of providers. You might actually have heard about this one, because I interviewed its creator, Dr. Terry Ellis, in July for a post called “Develop Your Own EMR Crazy, But This Guy Did It Anyway.” In fact, there’s nothing crazy about using an EMR custom-designed for the work you do.
September 4, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

EHRA’s EHR Code of Conduct – Will Anything Change?

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The big news that had to be covered today was the announcement by the EHR Association about the EHR Developer Code of Conduct. The core topics of the EHR Developer Code of Conduct are great:

  • General business practices
  • Patient safety
  • Interoperability and data portability
  • Clinical and billing documentation
  • Privacy and security
  • Patient engagement

Certainly there are other areas that I would have loved to see included, like EHR usability, but if we could address each of the areas listed above we’d have a big improvement over where we are today. Be sure to also check out the EHR Developer Code of Conduct and FAQs document and the EHR Developer Code of Conduct Implementation Guide for the full details on the EHR Code of Conduct.

The problem I have with this EHR Code of Conduct is that it has no teeth. There’s no enforcement mechanism or reporting mechanism to show how an EHR vendor has chosen to implement the code of conduct. They won’t even commit to having a list of EHR vendors that have adopted it. Trust me when I say that for every element of the EHR Code of Conduct, there’s A LOT of room for interpretation.

Where there’s room for interpretation, there’s room for abuse.

Obviously, when you bring together 40 EHR vendors it’s a real challenge to create something that has no interpretation. However, it seems they could have created a way to display how an EHR has chosen to meet the EHR code of conduct guidelines.

For example, the guideline says, “We will work with our customers to facilitate the export of patient data if a customer chooses to move from one EHR to another.” Then, it even sets a minimum export of a CCD/CCDA document. We could discuss how that type of document is nearly enough to switch EHR software, but even if it was enough, there’s a lot of ways you could implement this guideline. An EHR vendor could let the customer download a CCD for each patient individually and leave it to the customer to download all 5000 individual CCDs for their patients. That meets the guideline, but would be very different than an EHR vendor that gave you a one click download of CCDs for all your patients.

This qualitative data about how an EHR vendor has implemented the code of conduct should be easily available to doctors to compare across vendors. Otherwise, it has much less meaning and a lot of doctors will get bamboozled by the impression “commitment to the EHR Code of Conduct” implies. It’s similar (and even worse) than the pass/fail EHR certification. Not all certified EHR are created equal and not all EHR Code of Conduct adopters will be equal either. Why not be transparent about how they meet the code?

In the webinar they suggested that “the industry itself will kind of make it transparent who has adopted the code and who hasn’t adopted the code.” Maybe a third party will make that data available, but it’s a lot of work without a clear mechanism to pay for the work.

The other part of the code of conduct that really bothers me is the question posed in the title of this blog post: Will anything change? I loved a question that was asked on the webinar, “What pieces of the code of conduct were an EHR vendor not doing before the code?” They skirted the question saying that they couldn’t comment on it and some other tap dancing around the question. Does this mean that EHR vendors will just use the EHR Code of Conduct’s false trust to sale more product while doing little to change operationally? I’m certain this is not the intent of the committee, but could be the end result if those adopting the EHR Code of Conduct aren’t held accountable.

I got comments from two EHR vendors about the EHR Code of Conduct. Take a look to see what SRSSoft’s CEO Evan Steele said in their press release:

“SRS has always been committed to the principles identified in the Code of Conduct—designing our products with patient safety in mind, supporting physician/patient ownership of their data, safeguarding privacy and security, and communicating honestly in the marketplace,” says Evan Steele, CEO of SRS. “We are pleased to be among the first EHR companies to adopt the formal code, and hope that all vendors will follow suit.”

And John Glaser in the Siemens comment:

“The release of the EHR Developer Code of Conduct by the EHR Association is an important milestone in the maturation of the healthcare information technology industry, and we at Siemens Healthcare are proud to have supported its drafting and ratification,” said John Glaser, PhD, CEO, Siemens Healthcare, Health Services. “The Code of Conduct includes many elements that just make too much sense to be ignored and it’s my belief that Siemens and many players in this industry have already been adhering to many of these principles. Codifying these principles and providing a transparent way to show customers that companies are going to adopt them will help propel our industry’s ability to deliver safer, more effective and more interoperable solutions.”

It’s not like an EHR vendor’s going to come out and say they weren’t following the Code of Conduct principles. They’re not going to come out and say they don’t care about the EHR Code of Conduct principles either. The question is whether they state it in public or not, will EHR vendors really change? I have my doubts without a clear mechanism of accountability.

In some ways this reminds me of the doping scandal in cycling. Everyone knew that everyone else was doing it and no one wanted to say anything to rock the boat because it would mean they’d have to admit to doing it. Once a few cyclists stopped doping, they were at a disadvantage to those who continued the unhealthy practices.

I vividly remember in the post-Lance Armstrong years an interview with Levi Leipheimer where he was asked about doping. He tersely responded, “I hope all the dopers and cheaters get caught. It’s not fair that I’m having to compete with them.” (Not an exact quote, but you get the gist) Once he stopped doping he knew he was at a disadvantage. He wanted those that were still doping to be held accountable. I wonder if we’ll see something similar play out in the EHR world. Some EHR vendors follow the letter and intent of the code of conduct while other EHR vendors continue to skate around the edges since there’s still nothing holding them accountable. Just like Levi couldn’t name names in his interview, EHR vendors won’t be able to name names either.

As I said to start this post, I love the intent of the EHR Code of Conduct. I just worry that it will do little to change the EHR world as we know it.

I’d also be remiss if I didn’t also share a comment someone made on the Code of Conduct announcement webinar. Someone obviously didn’t realize their mic was on and they said, “It’s a love fest, an EHR Love Fest!” I’m not sure who it was that said it or why exactly they said it, but it gave me a good laugh. I always love a good EHR love fest myself.

June 11, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare IT Marketing

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I’m often surprised by people’s reaction when I say that I’m a blogger. Most then believe that it must be a part time thing that I do for fun at nights. While it started that way, blogging is my full time job. If it weren’t for a large number of companies who’ve supported my work over the years, I’d probably have one blog that I’d post to a couple times a month. I can’t say how much these companies support means to me.

As my blogs have grown and the industry has changed (when I started people didn’t even know what a blog was), I’ve been working to evolve with the industry. While display advertising still does quite well for me and my advertisers, there are a number of shifts happening in healthcare marketing. That’s why I launched Influential Networks, an EHR Job board, EMR and EHR whitepapers, email blasts, and a number of other projects I’m still working to officially launch like my EHR and Health IT video series.

There’s a lot happening when it comes to healthcare marketing, and next week as part of my EHR and Health IT interview series, I’m going to be doing an interview with Don Seamons from Lumeno Marketing and Shahid Shah from Influential Networks. More details on that to come, but it should be a really interesting conversation on the changing healthcare marketing landscape.

With everything I do, my goal is to provide value to everyone involved. For example, those reading the site get value from the free content that’s available to them and also get introduced to companies they may not have known about otherwise. Those companies that advertise benefit from exposure to people reading the content we create. I don’t always nail this perfectly, but I’m sincere in my efforts to provide value all around. Plus, whenever there’s a financial interest involved in something I’m doing, I try to make that clear to the reader. That way everyone knows any bias I may have and can make their own judgement on the content I provide.

With all of this in mind, I want to take a second recognize the new and renewing EMR & HIPAA advertisers.

ZH Healthcare – As most of you know, my blog run on the backs of many open source software products. So, I’m really glad to have an open source EMR company supporting EMR and HIPAA. ZH Healthcare is built on the back of the most successful ambulatory EHR software to date, OpenEMR. If you want the flexibility of an open source EHR, check them out.

Caristix – I love the tagline from their ad, “HL7 interfacing 50% faster.” I think that pretty much describes what Caristix offers to those in healthcare IT. HL7 is going to be with us for a long time to come, so every institution and company should know a great HL7 company. Check out Caristix if you’re looking to do some HL7 integrations.

Chetu – Rather than me trying to describe Chetu, check out this interview I did with Craig Schmidt from Chetu. You can see the breadth of experience they have developing software for healthcare. If you’re looking to outsource some IT development work, check out Chetu.

Renewing Advertisers
The heart and soul of our support is in our renewing advertisers. So, a big thanks to all of the companies listed below for renewing their ads with us. It’s great to look over so many of these companies who have been supporting us for so many years. Here’s to many more years working together. If you enjoy what we do here at EMR and HIPAA, check out the advertisers below and see if they offer something you’re looking for.
Ambir – Advertising since 1/2010
Amazing Charts – Advertising since 5/2011
simplifyMD – Advertising since 9/2012
Canon – Advertising since 10/2012

A number of other exciting things coming in the future. Thanks to all the readers and supporters of EMR and HIPAA.

May 22, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EMR and EHR Ads

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It seems fitting on Super Bowl week to take a second and look at the advertisers that make what we do here at EMR and HIPAA possible. None of their ads cost $1-2 million like the Super Bowl ads, but if you’re looking for some great Healthcare IT and EHR products then you’ve come to the right place. If you like what we do here at EMR and HIPAA, then take a minute and see the advertisers who like what we do as well.

Also, I have a special ad promotion for new advertisers from now through the middle of February. If you’re interested in knowing the details, drop me a note on our Contact Us page.

New EMR and HIPAA Advertisers
Canon – I can’t imagine anyone reading this needs an introduction to Canon. In the Healthcare IT space they offer a suite of scanners, printers and copiers that are found in healthcare organizations across the country. I even have the Canon imageFORMULA DR-C125 in my house and use it regularly. The need for heavy duty scanners in healthcare isn’t going to go away for a long time. I’m glad to have Canon on board as an advertiser.

iPatientCare – EHR vendors always do well as advertisers on EMR and HIPAA and so it’s great to have iPatientCare as a new advertiser. They provide the full suite of EHR, PMS, PHR, HIE, and Mobile that you could need along with all the important EHR and meaningful use certifications. I see that they’re going to be exhibiting at HIMSS at Booth #5519 if you want to check them out at HIMSS. Plus, I love that their website has an image that says they won 9 TEPR Awards. Many of you probably won’t even know what TEPR is since it’s no longer around. However, TEPR was a conference focused exclusively on EHR (although it was probably called EMR back then since it was before EHR became in Vogue). The fact that they won awards at TEPR shows how long iPatientCare’s been doing EHR.

simplifyMD – I first started working with simplifyMD when they graciously sponsored the New Media Meetup at HIMSS 2012 (The 2013 event will be announced shortly, but save Tuesday, March 5th from 6-8 on your calendar). It was a great event and they were a great sponsor. simplifyMD is a certifed EHR vendor that strives to tailor their EHR workflow to the doctor’s current workflow. Something that dotors love to hear and experience from their EHR. They’re a web based EHR. Plus, they recently came out with these great simplifyMD and EHR cartoons. I’m sure I’ll be featuring more of their cartoons in the future.

Returning EMR and HIPAA Advertisers
Sfax – I call Sfax a returning advertiser because they first started advertising on EMR and HIPAA back in December of 2009. So, they supported EMR and HIPAA back when we were just starting to get some traction. After a short hiatus, they’re back as an advertiser. What many don’t realize is that Sfax handles the faxing for a large number of the EHR vendors out there. While I generally avoid faxing as much as possible, sometimes it can’t be avoided and so I’m always grateful I can just send a fax similar to how I send an email using Sfax. Word on the street is that they have the next version of their software coming out soon. I’m excited to check it out.

Mitochon – Similar to Sfax, Mitochon first started advertising on EMR and HIPAA back in Decmber of 2010. After a short break they’re back again as advertisers. I’ve really enjoyed watching Mitochon mature as a Free EHR vendor (They do offer the full suite of free services: PM, EMR, HIE, etc). When Mitochon first started advertising with me, they were a brand new company with a big vision and lots of ideas, but still a lot of work to do. They’ve come a long way since then with their product and their company. One example of that was in their mobile EHR solution that I wrote about previously.

Renewing EMR and HIPAA Advertisers
A big thanks to all these renewing advertisers. It’s beautiful seeing so many of them supporting us for so long.
Practice Fusion – Advertising since April 2010
EMR Consultant – Advertising since July 2009
Amazing Charts – Advertising since May 2010
Cerner – Advertising since September 2011

I’m very appreciative of those advertisers who support the work we do. As I look at the stats for the advertisers, I’m really happy that we’re providing real value to their companies.

January 31, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Most Expensive Purchase is Second EHR

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At an event this fall I happened upon an executive at one of the major EHR vendors. We had a brief discussion in the lobby, but he said something that I found really interesting and I think describes the strategy of many of the large ambulatory EHR vendors. Here’s what he said:

“The Most Expensive Purchase is Their Second EHR”

A popular EHR consultant was in on the conversation and he started shaking his head in agreement.

I’ve long suggested that practices usually get their second EHR selection and implementation right. It just makes common sense that a practice would use the lessons learned from their first EHR implementation and be able to do a better job selecting and implementing the second EHR implementation. Although, I have heard of cases where it took the third implementation to do it right.

What intrigued me more was that this EHR vendor executive tied the purchase price to a second EHR. He’s right that price becomes a very different discussion when you are talking to someone who is buying their second EHR. In a lot of cases, price becomes a non-issue for those implementing their second EHR. They will spend whatever amount is needed to be able to get an EHR that they like to use. This is reflected in the quote above. I expect that’s why a second EHR is the most expensive purchase.

I wonder how many EHR companies are capitalizing on this fact. I’ve heard from numerous people that there’s a lot of EHR switching that’s happening right now. So, the idea of a second EHR is not outlandish. For many, the second EHR implementation has become a major reality.

December 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EHR Vendor as ACO

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When I was doing my interview with Dr. Jonathan Bertman and John Mooney about the Pri-Med acquisition of Amazing Charts, Jonathan Bertman made a really interesting comment that stuck with me. I asked him how he thought that Amazing Charts would do in this world of hospitals acquiring medical practices. He said that they were evaluated the environment, but then he suggested something that I’d never heard suggested before.

He said that he was considering the idea of whether Amazing Charts could act as an ACO for its members. You could tell that this was an idea that hadn’t been fleshed out completely. Although, I found it a concept that was really interesting to consider. Could an EHR vendor act as an ACO for the doctors that use their EHR?

The key question to me is really whether an EHR vendor has enough adoption of their EHR in a given area to be able to create an ACO. I imagine an EHR vendor like MEDENT that has only focused on selling their EHR in about 5 states could have enough geographically focused EHR adoption to be able to support the ACO model.

I’ve heard a number of small practice doctors call their colleagues to action when it comes to ACOs. Their call usually includes a reminder to the days of HMO’s when they claimed that doctors weren’t part of the conversation and that they can’t let the same thing happen with ACOs. Could an EHR vendor help to bring all these small practices to the ACO bargaining table? Seems like an interesting idea worth exploring to me.

December 18, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Health IT & EMR Advertising

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I want to take a minute to say a big Thank You to all the advertisers that support EMR and HIPAA. If you enjoy the content on EMR and HIPAA, then take a minute to look through this list and get an idea of the companies that support what we do.

The following are the new advertisers since I last posted about EMR and HIPAA advertisers, and then the list of renewing advertisers.

New Advertisers
Digital Health Conference – I wrote previously about how much I like the Digital Health Conference in New York City. So, you can imagine I’m happy to have their event advertised on EMR and HIPAA. I hope that I see many of you at the event. It’s a great one and seems to have even gotten better this year.

GE Healthcare – If any of you watched the Olympics, you have certainly seen that GE is doing a lot of work in healthcare. It is kind of cool to think that GE healthcare is advertising in the Olympics and on EMR and HIPAA. Obviously, quite a bit different goals and EMR & HIPAA might be a little more targeted to healthcare IT professionals than the Olympics.

Physia – For those of you who haven’t yet seen me talk about Physia on Twitter, this is a new venture I’m doing with Shahid Shah. Physia does really low cost physician websites. However, that’s just the beginning of what we have in mind. We plan to layer a whole set of services on top of those websites that turn your website from a glorified yellow page ad into an integral part of your office. It’s an exciting project that is going to bring physician websites into the next century.

Renewing Advertisers
Practice Fusion – Advertising since April 2010
SOAPware – Advertising since July 2010
EMR Consultant – Advertising since July 2009
Ambir – Advertising since January 2010
Amazing Charts – Advertising since May 2010
DrFirst – Advertising since January 2012
GE Centricity Business – Advertising since May 2011

I’m very appreciative of those advertisers who support the work we do. As I look at the stats for the advertisers, I’m really happy that we’re providing real value to their company.

September 5, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.