EHR Replacement Roadmap to Success

Posted on July 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re just now starting down the road of the EHR replacement cycle. Meaningful use has driven many to adopt an EHR too quickly and now the buyer’s remorse is setting in and we’re going to see a wave of EHR replacements. Some organizations are going to wait until meaningful use runs it course, but many won’t even be able to wait.

With this prediction in mind, I was interested by this Allscripts whitepaper: Key Hidden Reasons Your EHR Is Not Sustainable and What To Do About It. I always learn a lot about a company when I read whitepapers like this one. It says a lot about the way the company thinks and where they’re taking their company.

For example, in the whitepaper, Allscripts provides a list of questions to consider when looking to replace your EHR:

  • How do you DEPLOY the right core IT systems to succeed with value-based care?
  • How do you CONNECT to coordinate care with key stakeholders and manage your population?
  • How do you better ENGAGE patients in their own health?
  • How do you analyze mountains of raw data to ADVANCE patient and financial outcomes?
  • How do you get everyone within your own organization to FOLLOW THE ROADMAP to EHR success?

You can see that these questions share a certain view of where healthcare IT and EHR is headed. Imagine how this criteria would compare with the criteria for EHR selection even five years ago. Although, I wonder how many doctors really share this type of approach to EHR selection. Do doctors really want their EHR to handle the above list? Should they be worrying about the above items?

I don’t doubt that doctors are going to be more involved in population health and they’re going to need to engage patients more. However, this list does seem to lack some of the practical realities that doctors still need from their EHR. In fact, as I write this, I wonder if it’s still too early to know what a next generation EHR will need to include. Of course, that won’t stop frustrated EHR users from replacing their EHR just the same.