EHR Vendors Need to Expand Their Definition of Customer Service

Posted on July 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Living in Las Vegas I likely have a skewed idea of what customer service means. In the tech world, we have Zappos headquarters in downtown Las Vegas. Most of you are likely familiar with Zappos unique approach to customer service. They really have taken customer service to the next level and created an entire company culture around the customer service they provide. The same could be said for the experience that the various casinos on the strip offer their customers. They do a really amazing job at most casinos providing an amazing customer service experience.

With this background, I find it really smart of Kareo to open an office in Las Vegas. Although, that’s not really the point of this post. Instead, I want to focus on the idea that most EHR vendors need expand their idea of customer service.

As I look at the world of EHR customer service I see so many organization lacking. Certainly we see examples of terrible EHR customer service that include calling into a call center in another country where the person doesn’t speak English and has no power to actually solve a user’s problems (Disclaimer: I don’t have a problem with call centers in other countries if they are well trained and can actually solve problems). Of course, the same thing can apply to a call center in the US who can’t solve the users’ actual problems. Both are terrible customer service and a problem in the industry. However, there’s a far more painful problem that I don’t think most EHR vendors consider a part of their customer service plan and 99% of EHR vendors have done terrible at this.

Adding new features and accommodating an EHR user’s feature request is just as much a part of the EHR customer service experience as the person who answers the phone. I can assure you that every EHR vendor out there would get rated an F the past few years when it comes to this form of EHR customer service. Why do I know this? I know this because every EHR vendor has been focused on meaningful use that they haven’t had the time to add any meaningful EHR user feature requests and features outside of meaningful use.

This isn’t EHR vendors’ fault. The end users have required it and EHR vendors have had to spend the time doing it. However, EHR customer service has suffered as a consequence. Don’t believe me. Look through all the EHR press releases that have been released over the past couple years. Find me the plethora of press releases that talk about the innovations that EHR vendors have created for their end users that aren’t related to meaningful use. I get the press releases and they’re MIA.

That’s not to say that EHR vendors have done nothing for end users. They’ve made some incremental progress on a few things, but meaningful use has zapped their development time. Stage 2 was even worse. I look forward to the new day where EHR vendors can focus on great customer service and EHR features and not just MU.