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EHR Vendor Says Good Bye to Meaningful Use

Posted on December 30, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ComChart Medical Software, LLC president, Hayward K. Zwerling, MD, earlier this month posted a letter on The Health Care Blog saying that the ComChart EMR would no longer be meaningful use certified. Here’s a portion of the letter that describes the reasoning:

ComChart EMR will continued to be certified as a Complete EMR for Stage I Meaningful Use. Unfortunately, we will not be able to meet the Stage 2 (or greater) Meaningful Use certification requirements as these requirements are technically extremely difficult to implement.

In addition to the Meaningful Use mandates, there continues to be a never ending stream of new mandates such as ICD-10, PQRI, Meaningful Use 2, Meaningful Use 3, SNOMED, ePrescribing, LOINC, Direct Project, health information exchanges etc. As a result of the mountain of mandates, ComChart EMR and the other small EMR companies will have to choose to implement the mandates or use their resources to add “innovative” features to their EMR. Unfortunately, the small EMR companies do not have the resources to do both.

(I suspect this is also true, to some extent, for all EMR companies.)

While the individual people involved in promulgating these EMR mandates (mostly) have the best of intentions, they clearly do not understand what transpires in the exam room, as many of the mandated features confer little or no benefit to either the patient or the healthcare provider.

In addition to a lack of understanding of what is important during the process of providing healthcare, it has also become apparent to me that the Federal and State health information technology agenda is now largely driven by the strongest HIT companies and health institutions; the individual physician is only an afterthought in the entire process.

This choice basically means that anyone interested in meaningful use and EHR incentive money won’t be doing so with ComChart EMR. The regulations say that even someone attesting to meaningful use stage 1 in 2014 has to use a 2014 certified EHR. ComChart won’t be able to meet that requirement.

I knew that this was going to happen with a number of EMR vendors, but ComChart really missed a huge opportunity with this announcement. The most damning part of the letter is when Dr. Zwerling says “we will not be able to meet the Stage 2 (or greater) Meaningful Use certification requirements as these requirements are technically extremely difficult to implement.” I was aghast by this statement. So much so that I had a brief email exchange with Dr. Zwerling to see if he really meant what he said. Was it that they weren’t able to meet the requirements or that they chose not to meet them?

He responded, “Anything can be done, it is just a question of how much resources are going to be thrown at the problem and what is not going to get done return.”

It seems that Dr. Zwerling didn’t consult a PR or marketing person on how to make the most of this decision. Any of them would have told him that this decision could be a huge opportunity to differentiate the ComChart EHR from all the hundreds of certified carrot chasing EHR companies out there.

If Dr. Zwerling had asked me, I’d have told him that he should have said, “ComChart EHR has talked with our hundreds of physician end users about meaningful use and EHR certification and we’ve found that they don’t value any of the meaningful use criteria. Because of doctors desire to not be bogged down by meaningful use requirements, we’ve chosen to listen to our doctors and focus on what makes doctors lives easier. We’ll continue innovating our product to the needs of doctors, but we’ll be letting doctors drive that innovation versus some committee in Washington.”

I could keep going, but you get the idea. ComChart could have told every doctor out there that they were the ULTIMATE PHYSICIAN EHR that cares so much about the physicians who use their EHR that they’re shunning meaningful use because it’s detrimental to the way physicians should be practicing medicine. Making this case would not be hard and the message would resonate with the majority of physicians.

I’m not sure if this strategy would work or not. Government money that’s perceived as “free” is a hard opponent. However, government bureaucracy and headaches are an easy target that everyone understands and hates. In ComChart’s case, saying that they essentially aren’t capable of the complex meaningful use requirements is sending the wrong message. All doctors hear when they read this is that your EMR development team isn’t sophisticated or strong enough to keep up. What a missed opportunity and likely the nail in ComChart’s coffin!

Hopefully this is a warning message to any other EHR vendors who choose to go the route of shunning meaningful use and EHR certification. I’m not sure that shunning MU is a winning strategy for an EHR vendor, but being the physician advocate at least gives them a fighting chance.

5 EHR Myths Debunked

Posted on October 14, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The people at AdvancedMD put out a whitepaper called EHR Myths Debunked: 5 Status Quo Myths that Hold You back and Reduce Your Bottom Line. I love the topic of debunking EHR myths. There are a lot of them out there that are propped up by misinformation. Plus, the EHR world is moving so quickly, it’s hard to keep up with all of the changes which solve the previous issues.

I love a lot of the stats in the whitepaper that they use to debunk the myth. For example, they say that “$42,000 could be wasted annually on paper charts.” This goes with the myth that looks at the financial sense of a paper chart system.

I found the last myth on their list really interesting: “Portability of patient records is a luxury for large practices.” I’d extend this myth to something I’ve heard some people say: “Small practices don’t need to have a portable patient record.” I’ve certainly seen those doctors who don’t want their patient data portable. In their mind they think that if the patient record can’t be accessed from home, then they won’t have to work on it from home. However, this isn’t a reality for most doctors. Ask the doctor who has to drive into their office at midnight to find a patient record if he likes the idea of a EHR software that’s easily accessed from anywhere at any time.

All of this reminds me of my EMR and EHR benefits series. There are so many benefits to EHR that we just take for granted. The EHR Myths whitepaper is a good way to remember many of those benefits.

Don’t Act Like Charting on Paper Was Fast

Posted on May 23, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the things I hear people talk about all the time is how much time they spend charting in their EMR. There’s little question that doctors, nurses, and front desk staff’s lives revolve around an EMR when one is implemented in an office. However, the same was true with the paper chart.

How many times have we hear doctors say, “I’ve got a stack of paper charts I have to finish.”? Or the phrase, “I’m drowning in charting.” It happened all the time even in the paper chart world. Why else would a doctor take a stack of paper charts home with them in their car. It wasn’t for some light reading at night. It was so they could catch up on their paper charting (yes, some took them home for their hospital rounds too).

Don’t get me wrong here. I’m not saying that we should give inefficient and poorly designed EMR software a pass. Absolutely not! I am saying that far too many people forget how inefficient paper could be and how the charting and documentation requirements took a lot of time before EMR as well.

In my EHR benefits series, I wrote about the efficiency benefits of Legible Notes and Accessible Charts. I’ve heard many doctors talk about how templates help make them more efficient when it comes to charting. I know many doctors who can touch type so quickly that they can’t imagine writing a paper chart anymore. I know many doctors who use a scribe and see amazing efficiency with charting.

On the other side, I know some who hate their EMR. Their EMR is so slow that they can barely chart in it. They get overwhelmed by the clicks. They spend hours trying to find the right diagnosis or code or template. They have stacks of EMR charts waiting for them to finish charting.

The reality is that you can paint the EMR picture either way. I’ve seen both sides of the story happen many times. However, far too many who ridicule the inefficiencies of EMR seem to forget the inefficiency of paper.

The Fiscal Cliff of Primary Care

Posted on December 20, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Hello Health blog has a really interesting article up discussing what they called the Primary Care Fiscal Cliff. The thing I like most about the post is the data they provide on what’s happening with primary care doctors. Take for example this list of statistics:

  • Primary care practice income rose just $500 from 2008-2011
  • Operating expenses of a practice continues to rise each year
  • Primary care physicians can spend an average of 13 hours a week of uncompensated care worth over $30,000 in lost revenue a year
  • The cost of a traditional electronic health record can easily exceed $20,000 in the first year with a 5-year projected cost approaching $50,000 per physician

I’m not sure that the US government’s fiscal cliff has much relationship to the primary care doctor fiscal cliff (except for the possible Medicare cuts), but it’s very safe to say that primary care doctors are in a real financial predicament.

In the Hello Health post they suggested from their own research that practice finances and EHR are the two issues keeping primary care physicians up at night. I’m sure these findings won’t be a surprise to any primary care doctors. Plus, it’s worth noting that the finances of a primary care practice are tied to an EHR in many ways.

I have often questioned how much influence the government EHR incentive money has had on getting doctors to adopt EHR. Whenever I do, I usually get a response from a primary care doctor saying that they wouldn’t be implementing an EHR if it weren’t for the EHR incentive money and that they were depending on the EHR incentive money to help cover the new EHR expense.

In my recently started EHR benefit series I’m hoping to expand the thinking when it comes to EHR revenue implications. There are still tens of thousands of primary care doctors that need to implement an EHR or replace their existing EMR. Understanding the financial ties to EHR will help a practice ensure a more successful EHR implementation.

At the core of the question is whether EHR software is a financial benefit or a financial loss. The cop out answer to that question is that it depends on how you implement the EHR and which EHR you implement. I wish someone would take the time to study the top 20 EHR companies and evaluate how practices have done pre-EHR implementation and post EHR implementation. Plus, they’d need to take into account the cost of an EHR. That type of study would produce a lot of interesting EHR data.

My gut feeling having participated in numerous EHR implementations and heard from thousands of other EHR implementations is that the result is usually a wash. In most EHR implementations I don’t think there’s a net financial gain or loss. There are outliers on both sides of that spectrum, but I think for most it has some pros and some cons.

With that said, I think there are long term benefits to a practice that has an EHR. While the immediate financial returns may not come, I think that the EHR in a practice is going to be essential for many of the financial gains a practice wants to achieve in the future. The most obvious example is becoming part of an ACO. Can you really get the financial benefits of being in an ACO without an EHR? I think the answer will likely be no. You need the EHR data to obtain and report on the ACO improvements your practice achieves.

A Child’s View of EMR, EMR Tech Needs, and Typeface for Doctors

Posted on September 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Can you believe summer is over? It’s September and the cool weather of Fall is just around the corner (I hope). Plus, that means health IT conference season is close as well. Why do they have to put all the conferences all together at the same time. I could travel to a health IT conference every single day in October. That’s crazy. I’d prefer just one a month. I wonder who could fix that.

Enough of that. This weekend’s EMR Twitter roundup is a really interesting one that includes a number of images which are really memorable. Plus, I think you’ll even find a little humor in this roundup.


This makes me want to do the same thing with my child. They love drawing and I wonder how they’d draw it. Plus, they’ve been to the doctor enough they could probably do it without my even going in. I wonder if they’d draw the laptop in or not. With that said, this picture will resonate with me for a while. At least the picture was colorful and a nice place for a child.


I think that’s the order I’ve seen most doctors go when it comes to EMR technology. In the ambulatory environment they usually want a laptop. A desktop in the office for the more in depth work they do in the EMR. Plus, smart phones are still an afterthought. Mostly because most EHR software doesn’t work too well on a smartphone. Even an iPad is so so with EMR software today.


This image gave me a good laugh. I’m sure many doctors get tired of the physician handwriting jokes. Interestingly enough, I’ve never heard of handwriting issues from those using an EHR.

10 Ways to Meaningful EHR Use for Doctors

Posted on August 31, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Rob Lamberts, MD offered 10 ways to make an EHR meaningful for doctors on the KevinMD blog. It’s a really interesting list that’s worth sharing:

1. Require all visits to have a simple summary.

2. Allow coding gibberish to be hidden.

3. Require all ancillary reports to be available to the patient.

4. Require integration with a comprehensive and unified patient calendar.

5. Put most of the chart in the hands of the patient.

6. Pay for e-visits and make them simple for all involved.

7. Allow e-prescription of all controlled drugs.

8. Require patients’ records to be easily searchable.

9. Standardize database nomenclature and decentralize it.

10. Outlaw faxing.

That’s a pretty compelling list. What do you think of his list? Are there things you’d add to it?

EHR Mandate, HIPAA Privacy Violations, EHR Companies, Benefits of EMR and EHR and more

Posted on June 5, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most long time readers know, I’m a bit of a stats fanatic when it comes to my website. I love to see the internal numbers of what’s happening on my website. In fact, you might remember that I’ve wondered why I’m not as interested in my “health numbers.” Although, I actually am interested. I love getting my cholesterol value after giving blood. I’m using my scale more and more (with sad, but motivating results). The real challenge is that we need personal health data to be as easily created and tracked as website health data, but I digress.

I thought it would be fun to look over the past 3 months on EMR and HIPAA and see which pages and posts are the most popular. Plus, I’ll add some commentary or updates on each.

The most visited posts in the last 3 months was my post on the 2014 EHR Mandate. When you look at the searches I get referred to EMR and HIPAA, you can see why this page has been so popular. I’m actually really glad that doctors get this page since it does a great job describing how there isn’t an EHR mandate. Although, there are incentives, penalties and reasons why you might want to implement an EHR. I’m sure that post has done a lot to dispel the myth of the EHR mandate.

The next most popular post is my very old post on HIPAA Privacy Violations & HIPAA Lawsuits. I expect the reason it’s so popular is that many clinics are worried about HIPAA and any issues they may have with it. Plus, it’s kind of like a car crash, you can’t resist taking a look to see what’s happened. Those two factors make for great blog reading.

My next two most popular pages are both lists of EMR and EHR companies. The second list is from a post on the overwhelming list of EMR and EHR companies I did back in early 2006, but it’s still amazingly popular. A lot has changed since 2006 in the EHR world. It’s fun to look through the list and see which EHR software is still around and see some old names of companies that are no longer with us. One thing that remains the same is the list of EMR and EHR vendors is still overwhelming. Although, maybe that has changed. The list of EMR and EHR vendors might be more overwhelming today than it was in 2006.

I’m really glad to see that so many people are reading my list of EMR & EHR benefits page. Far too many practices have put on their Meaningful Use blinders that they forget to look at the reasons that physicians were implementing EHR software before the government waived $36 billion in front of their face. There are some guaranteed benefits to EHR including: legibility of patient charts and Accessibility of Charts. It’s hard to put a dollar value on those, but they are incredibly valuable.

Another popular post was about Email Not Being HIPAA Secure. The next most popular post after it is ironically “HIPAA Lawsuit – PHI by Un-encrypted Email.” I think many doctors have appreciated the insight about various technologies and how to satisfy HIPAA. Another in that series is the Texting is Not HIPAA Secure.

The final post I’ll look at in this round up is called Example of EMR Stimulus Medicare Penalties. Those EHR penalties are looming and I think this post provides some good perspective and understanding on how big the EHR penalties are for a practice. Sure, each practice needs to add in their own Medicare numbers, but that’s simple math.

Can a Patient Focused EHR Sell?

Posted on March 2, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In one of my many recent conversations or readings about EHR, I had this really interesting question come into my mind:

Can a Patient Focused EHR Sell?

At the core of this question is another question: Why do doctors buy and implement EHR software?

As I process these two questions, I’m once again faced with what I call a perverse set of incentives in healthcare. Turns out that these perverse incentives are all to common in healthcare and they make me sick when I think about them.

I’m sure many out there would argue that none of the EHR software out there are patient focused. We could argue that point (particularly the word none), but let’s just assume for a second that the EHR software out there today isn’t patient focused. Is the EHR vendor responsible for not making patient focused EHR software or are they just meeting the requests of doctors and clinics.

As I scan through my 6+ years of experience living and breathing EHR, I’m trying to remember a case where a doctor chose to go with EHR based on improving the care of the patients. I can think of a few incidents where patient care had a subtle after thought. By far, the most common reasons for implementing an EHR have been about the impact to the doctor and/or clinic. Most of the reasons are financial or lead to financial implications.

Which EHR sounds better to doctors?
-Improved Efficiency
-Increased Reimbursement
or
-Better Patient Care
-Improved Clinical Outcomes

We could certainly argue some indirect benefits to patients by doctors being more efficient and practices doing better financially. However, in healthcare patients are rarely the direct beneficiaries of any efficiencies that are gained. The doctor, the clinic, and/or the insurance companies usually take those benefits.

I’ve written before about one of the major challenges is that patients: 1. don’t have good ways to differentiate and measure the quality of the medical care they receive and 2. some don’t have a choice of physician because it’s the only physician in that area. These two factors make it so that the quality of patient care (at least within some reasonable norm) has little impact on the number of patients that visit a certain doctor.

This is a challenging question that I don’t have the answer to, but it seems clear to me that the EHR market is delivering the solutions that people are asking them to create. I wish there was a way we could adjust the market to create more patient focused EHR. Maybe the ACO movement will help us get there.

Quick Disclaimer: While this describes general economic motives in the EHR market, I have known a number of people and even some companies in the EHR world that want to do what’s best for the patient regardless of the bottom line. As one EHR vendor CEO told me, “We’ve left money on the table.” I just wish that market forces could be turned to do what’s right for healthcare so everyone would be incentivized to do good.

Study Ignores Other Benefits of Electronic Health Records

Posted on January 25, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve now had two people send me links to a study coming out of Stanford University that says that EHR software doesn’t improve patient care in the US (Here’s one story about it from Reuters). So I figure that it must be a topic that my readers would enjoy me discussing. Here’s a portion of their summary:

A team from Stanford University in California analyzed nationwide survey data from more than 250,000 visits to physicians’ offices and other outpatient settings between 2005 and 2007.

They found electronic health records did little to improve quality, even when there was “decision support” software that gives doctors tips on how best to treat individual patients.

I’ve always found it a bit off to talk about EMR software as a means to improve the quality of care that a doctor provides. For the vast majority of healthcare, more information, clinical decision support, drug to drug interaction checking, drug to allergy checking, etc aren’t going to improve the care a doctor provides. First, because the doctors have been well trained to do many of these things already. Second, because if I come in as a generally healthy patient with a common cold, then of course the doctor doesn’t need any of these advanced EMR functionality.

Now in more advanced and complicated cases, there is potential that an EMR software could offer some benefit. I remember a doctor commenting back in 2009 on my blog about how the Body of Medical Knowledge could become to complex for the human mind to process it all. Whether we’re there or yet, is open for debate, but the concept is interesting. Although, this still only applies to the outlier cases.

I remember one time hearing a clinician tell me about how the Drug to Drug interaction alerts informed her of some medical knowledge that she hadn’t known previously. So, there are instances where various parts of an EMR software can provide better patient care, but is it dramatic enough difference to really improve the quality of care? I think that’s a hard argument to really make. At least with the current iteration of EMR software.

Other EMR Benefits
Quality of Care aside, I think the thing that studies like this (and their related headlines) miss is the other benefits of having an EMR system (see also my list of EMR benefits in my EMR Selection e-Book).

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard doctors talk about how they love the legibility and accessibility of patient charts in the EMR. No difficult to read handwriting (others or their own). No waiting for chart pulls. These are guaranteed benefits to having an EMR system. Sure, it’s hard to quantify them when it comes to dollar signs or improved quality of care. However, they’re a real tangible benefit to having an EMR. Not to mention that I still think there’s long term benefits to widespread adoption of EMR that we can’t even imagine yet.

I could go on about many of the other benefits. It’s just unfortunate that studies and those who report on these studies don’t take into account these other benefits of EMR software.

UPDATE: Over at HIStalk, Mr. H also points out that the study only focuses on a couple quality measures. So, it doesn’t actually say that EHR doesn’t improve quality of care, but instead it says that it doesn’t improve quality of care when it comes to the couple simple measures that the study used to measure it. There could be many other quality measures where EHR does improve the quality of care. We just don’t know.

EMR and Doctor Liability Insurance Discounts

Posted on January 7, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A source just told me that an insurance company that does only professional liability insurance for doctors is providing a 5% discount to all doctors who implement EHR and use it in a meaningful manner.

This is really interesting news for me since I’ve seen a number of really interesting debates about whether use of an EHR would actually raise liability insurance for doctors or lower it. This is the first confirmed company I’ve found that has actually acted on a doctors use of an EMR in their liability insurance premiums (of course, maybe there are more I don’t know about).

Of course, there are a lot of details missing in the statement posted above. For example, how does the liability insurance company plan to measure if the doctor is using an EMR in a “meaningful manner”? Will they discriminate (not in a bad way, but in a good business way) against EMR software which isn’t up to snuff?

Lots of other issues that could be talked about, but I’m heading to the Digital Health Summit at CES. So, this should start a really interesting discussion and I’m sure I’ll do some follow up posts on this subject since I have plenty to say about it.

Also, looks like I’ll have to add liability insurance savings to my list of EMR benefits. I’m thinking it’s about time to do a series of posts on the “EMR Benefits.” One EMR benefit post a day would start a really interesting set of discussions I think.