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Dragon Medical Enabled EHR – Chart Talk

Posted on July 12, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently was asked by Deanna from Mighty Oak to check out a demo of their Chart Talk EHR software (previously called DC talk). It’s always a challenge for me since there are only so many hours in a day to be demoing the more than 300 EHR companies out there. So, instead of doing a full demo, I asked Deanna to highlight a feature of Chart Talk that set them apart from other EHR software companies.

She told me that Chart Talk’s killer feature was its integration with Dragon Naturally Speaking’s voice recognition software. I was very familiar with DNS and other voice recognition software, so I was interested to see if they really could create a deep integration of Dragon Medical over the other EHR software I’d seen that integrated it as well.

I have to admit that I was pretty impressed by the demo. It was really quite amazing the number of things that you could do with your voice in the Chart Talk EHR software. Certainly standard transcription like documentation worked out well in Chart Talk. However, the impressive part was how you could navigate the EHR with your voice. Here’s a demo video that does a decent job illustrating it:

What made the documentation even more interesting (and is partially shown in the above video) is the use of various DNS macros and the even more powerful built in macros for pulling in vital signs, past history, etc. Plus, I like the idea that when you have any issues with Dragon Medical, you don’t get someone at your EHR company who doesn’t really know much about Dragon. Since Chart Talk’s completely focused on Dragon integration, you know they know how to support it properly.

I of course only saw a partial demo of the Chart Talk software. So, I’m only commenting on the Dragon Medical integration in this post. It would take a much longer and more in depth evaluation to know about the other features and challenges to the software.

Plus, there’s no doubt that voice recognition isn’t for everyone. They tell me that some people do the charting with their voice right in front of the patient. That feels awkward to me, but I guess it works for some people. Then, there’s the people who don’t want to go through the learning curve of voice recognition. However, I’d guess that Chart Talk could make a case for being some of the best at teaching people to overcome that learning curve since every one of their users uses it.

I also know that Chart Talk originally started as DC talk. So, anyone considering Chart Talk should likely take a good look at how well the software fits with their specialty. I know the people at Mighty Oak have been making a big effort to work for any specialty. However, like every EHR software out there, they just work better for some specialties better than others.

It’s also worth noting that Chart Talk is a client server EHR. I guess the web browser isn’t quite ready for the processing power that’s required to have a nice voice enabled user experience.

Needless to say I was impressed by the voice recognition integration and how pretty much every command can be performed using your voice. I’d be interested to know of other EHR companies that are striving for that type of deep integration. I’m not just talking about being able to basically dictate into a text field. I’m talking about actual navigating the EMR with your voice.

Voice Recognition Set to Grow in Healthcare

Posted on February 17, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent Healthcare IT News article, they wrote about a KLAS research study that found that the speech recognition market is ready to grow. Here’s a small portion of the article:

Providers report a demonstrable return on their speech recognition dollars, according to a new report from KLAS. Participants of the study indicated benefits of speech recognition such as staff reductions, improved report turnaround times and increased physician satisfaction.

“The speech recognition market is ripe for healthy growth,” said Ben Brown, author of the report. “Currently, less than one in four hospitals use the technology, however, in light of meaningful use and the benefits providers point out in this study, we expect it will assume a more prominent place in the role of clinical documentation.”

It seems like a bit of journalistic spin to say that speech recognition provides a “demonstrable return.” My personal experience tells me that users either love or hate speech recognition. The article does aptly state that it requires some up front investment to learn voice recognition and access the long term benefits that voice recognition provides.

The other obvious part of the report is that Dragon still dominates the voice recognition landscape. I recently also got an email from Eric Fishman of EMR Consultant, EHR Scope, EHR TV, etc fame (and also an advertiser on this site) about a new voice recognition, dictation and transcription software they’re distributing called Frisbee.

They have a bunch of videos showing Frisbee transcription software in action on EHR TV. I found the one called Frisbee, Dragon Medical and EMR Workflow pretty interesting.

I could see this type of software providing the platform for the future of the transcriptionist. Neil Versel recently posted the news that the Medical Transcription Industry Association (MTIA) will be changing their name to the Clinical Documentation Industry Association. No doubt transcription companies are looking at ways to survive. One of those ways will be for the transcriptionist to go beyond just transcribing to assisting with the clinical documentation (including the complicated ICD-10). Seems like Frisbee’s voice recognition into the EMR with the Frisbee routing capabilities for doctors approval and sign off could be an interesting workflow.

I’m not quite as bullish on voice recognition as the report linked above, but there’s no doubt that voice recognition will continue to play a role in healthcare. Especially as it continues to improve its recognition ability and becomes integrated with mobile devices.

“I use EMR and so I am MY OWN transcriptionist.” – Doc at AAFP

Posted on September 30, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m currently in Denver attending the AAFP conference. So far I’m really glad that I’ve come to the conference. It’s really fantastic to be surrounded by providers. It’s a stark contrast to HIMSS where you’re mostly surrounded by industry insiders and not that many providers. The practical questions the doctors ask are fascinating.

Of course, the comments they make are also fascinating. The title of this post is a comment one lady made in the David Kibbe session on Meaningful Use:
“I use EMR and so I am MY OWN transcriptionist.”

The problem with this comment is that it just doesn’t have to be true. It could be true depending on which EMR software you selected and how you implemented the EMR. However, that’s a choice you make when you choose and implement an EMR without any transcription.

I’ve actually seen a number of EMR vendors that have some really nice and deep integration between their software and transcription companies. There are even transcription companies that are building their own EMR software which obviously leverages the power of transcription.

Plus, many doctors happily use voice recognition like Dragon Naturally Speaking to still do what essentially amounts to transcription with their EMR.

Add in developments around natural language processing and the idea of preserving the narrative that is so valuable and interesting while capturing the granular data elements is a really interesting area of EMR development.

Of course, one of the problems with this idea is that many people like to use the savings on transcription costs as a way to justify the cost of purchasing and implementing an EMR. Obviously, you’ll need to look for other EMR benefits if you choose to continue transcription.

Just to round out the conversation, there are a wide variety of EMR vendors which each have their own unique style of documentation. Part of the problem is that many people don’t look much past the big “Jabba the Hutt” EMR vendors which are these ugly click interfaces that spit out a huge chunk of text that nobody wants to see. There’s plenty of EMR vendor options out there. Keep looking if you don’t like an EMR vendor’s documentation method.

Digital Voice Recorders Replacing Transcriptionists

Posted on March 11, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve discussed before the voice recognition software Dragon NaturallySpeaking (Medical and Preferred) and the microphone options and even announced when Dragon NaturallySpeaking Medical first came available. It’s enough to say that we’re big fans of voice recognition software and Dragon NaturallySpeaking in particular. It’s a great companion to an EMR or EHR implementation.

Today, I came across the Sony Digital Voice Recorder with Dragon NaturallySpeaking Software and I wondered if any of my readers have used this before. It seems like it could be an interesting way to replace a transcriptionist.

Basically, the doctor would record his notes on this device and then the Dragon NaturallySpeaking software would convert it to text and could be easily placed in the EMR. For $150, that seems like a bargain.

Really, the only question is how good Dragon NaturallySpeaking is at converting the recorded voice into text. I imagine it’s at least as good as doing it in real time. Does anyone have experience with it? If I hear some good reviews, then I’ll add it to my list of EMR technologies. This seems like it could be a really good solution for that doctor that doesn’t want to give up his/her transcribing ways.


Dragon Naturally Speaking Preferred Versus Medical

Posted on February 13, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve always been a little bit skeptical about paying the $1000+ for the medical version of Dragon Naturally Speaking. $1000 just seems like a lot of money to be paying for what seems to amount to some medical dictionaries. However, someone who is very familiar with nuance and Dragon Naturally Speaking told me that doctors should really purchase the DNS Medical or they’ll end up dissatisfied.

Well, today I was reading the forum on Amazon for Dragon Naturally Speaking which asks if the medical version is worth it for doctors. The responses generally weren’t worth while, but someone who calls themselves “Pain Doc” suggested the following:

I have used DNS for about 7 years. I started with version 6 as I recall. I had my transcriptionist email me the text files from all my dictations for several years and then I “fed” those to DNS to learn the vocabulary. I then had a very serviceable medical DNS for my practice and an unemployed transcriptionist.

What a genius idea for anyone that’s currently doing transcription. A great way to save about $1000 on software.

Check out the following prices for the various versions of DNS on Amazon:
UPDATE: Dragon NaturallySpeaking Premium 12 is out now.
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 10 Preferred – Currently $151.49 with $50 rebate ($101.49 after rebate)
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 9 Preferred – Currently $92.97
I’m still looking around for the best location to buy Dragon NaturallySpeaking Medical.

Interestingly, this same person quote above also said, “I also upgraded to DNS 10.0 which is a total POS. I am back to 9.0 and wouldn’t recommend 10.0 to anyone.” I’d love to hear more people’s comments on this subject.

Wireless Microphones for Dragon Naturally Speaking

Posted on February 12, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent comment by Tom Hamilton, he gave a nice review of a wireless microphone that can be used with Dragon Naturally Speaking Medical. I figured I’d been covering enough EMR politics and implementation lately that it was about time to mingle a little bit of technical content in the middle.

I’ve been told a number of times that if you want to use Dragon Naturally Speaking medical, then finding a high quality microphone is absolutely essential to a quality voice recognition experience. Check out Tom’s review of the Samson Stage 5 Wireless microphone. Wireless is definitely the future.

Samson Stage 5 Wireless Microphone With Dragon NaturallySpeaking Review:<iframe src=”http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=crashutah-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&asins=B0002ORQ56&md=10FE9736YVPPT7A0FBG2&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr” style=”width:120px;height:240px;” scrolling=”no” marginwidth=”0″ marginheight=”0″ frameborder=”0″></iframe> 

We’ve just completed Phase 3 testing of the new Samson Stage 5 wireless microphone [$99 on Amazon] and you can read our complete review by clicking Samson Stage 5 Review but the short version is that the new Samson Stage 5 wireless VHF microphone combo includes both a lapel microphone and a headset microphone, costs $99-$105 and is as accurate as our best (starting at $115) theBoom “O” [$149.99 on Amazon] and $145 Sennheiser ME3 wired microphones [$135.83 on Amazon] which cost more and are not wireless. The Stage 5 even includes a three-year warranty. With the exception of end users who require extreme portability, we can’t imagine why anyone would want to pay extra for a wired microphone with a one or two-year warranty. Now everyone can afford to cut the cord!

KnowBrainer, Inc. Support Staff – Tom Hamilton
A Nuance Gold Certified Endorsed Vendor
ALWAYS Ask If Your Speech Recognition Vendor Is Nuance Certified

Thanks Tom for the review.

Check out the following prices for the various versions of DNS on Amazon:


I’m still looking around for the best location to buy Dragon NaturallySpeaking Medical.

Dragon NaturallySpeaking (Medical) Version 10 Available

Posted on August 14, 2008 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

NaturallySpeaking (Medical) Version 10 is now available. Have any of the EMR and HIPAA readers used DNS 10? I’d be interested to know people’s reviews of DNS 10 as compared to 9. Luckily the upgrade is relatively inexpensive to go from one version to the next, but I’d be interested to hear people’s experience with DNS 10.

One of my blog readers already did their KnowBrainer 7 page pictorial preliminary review of DNS 10. Too bad the pictorial review is a pdf file. Also, that review is pretty technical, so if you’ve never used DNS before, then I wouldn’t suggest reading that review.

Check out the following prices for the various versions of DNS on Amazon:
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 10 Preferred – Currently $151.49 with $50 rebate ($101.49 after rebate)
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 9 Preferred – Currently $92.97
I’m still looking around for the best location to buy Dragon NaturallySpeaking Medical.

Health Information and the New iPhone

Posted on July 13, 2008 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A few days ago I got the following email to my EMR and HIPAA email address. Ignore the part where the company is trying to sell their service and think about 1. Should patients be diagnosing themselves and 2. should EMR companies provide an EMR interface on the iPhone.

This Friday, July 11, the new Apple iPhone 3G becomes available to the public. The new $199 iPhone 3G will make mobile applications even more accessible to consumers and professionals. Healthcare is one of the most popular topics among consumers, and the iPhone 3G enables consumers to access many new healthcare applications including the free A.D.A.M. Symptom Navigator. According to Harris Interactive, nearly 117 million Americans have searched for health information online. Eighty-five percent of those have searched one or more times per month.

The free Symptom Navigator for the iPhone 3G helps consumers match medical symptoms with relevant assessments and appropriate treatments. Symptom Navigator empowers consumers to make the best use of the healthcare system and understand when self-care or a doctor visit is appropriate. To access the Symptom Navigator on the iPhone 3G, visit http://iphone.adam.com[Don’t try to go there in a regular browser]. The tool offers possible causes of the symptom and medical condition, how to self treat, when it is an emergency, when you should call a doctor, and how to prevent it in the future.

Here’s my take on the two questions I posed above:

1. Should patients be diagnosing themselves?
The application described above is a very interesting idea. It’s also true that patients are trying to self diagnose whether we like it or not. I know that when something happens to myself or my kids, I always check what’s online. However, I don’t always trust what’s online. I just take it for what it’s worth and then use that to help me communicate in a more effective way with my doctor.

This iPhone application takes patient diagnosis of problems to the next level. I’m not sure I trust an iPhone to diagnose me. As a consumer, would I really benefit from the information it offers? There’s just something really comforting about calling and talking to someone and hearing someone’s voice tell you that your child is going to be fine and not to worry about it or instructions to take them to the doctor as soon as possible to resolve whatever issue they have. I don’t think I’ll get that same satisfaction out of an iPhone health application. Most likely what I’d see happening is people would check that application and then call the nurse just the same. Something every nurse and doctor in the country loves. Patients trying to diagnose themselves.

I also wonder what’s going to happen when the iPhone application misdiagnoses a person and tells them to stay home when they should be rushed to the hospital. Can you imagine the liability this company will have if someone dies because their iPhone told them not to worry about it? Makes me wonder how this company got investment. Now, I’m sick of liability ruining innovation, but you just have to wonder when we’re talking about life and death.

I should also mention that I’m a nerd by profession. If I, being a nerd, don’t think I’d use a service like this I wonder how many less computer literate people will be interested in this application.

2. Should EMR companies provide an EMR interface on the iPhone?
The first person I ever saw with an iPhone was actually a doctor I know. I wonder if he’s ever tried to access his EMR using his iPhone. The above email made me wonder how useful would it be to have an iPhone interface for doctors to access their EMR.

Of course, there’s no arguing the portability of the iPhone and the latest iPhone’s 3G technology means that it should have the bandwidth necessary to accomplish such a task. However, the iPhone is much like Dragon Naturally Speaking (DNS). DNS can pretty much work with any EMR. However, there are deep integrations that can be done with DNS that take DNS from a pure data entry application into something much more powerful. The iPhone can pretty much work with any web based EMR that works with the safari web browser. However, without an EMR interface designed for the iPhone, a doctor won’t benefit from all of the cool user interface and touch screen features the iPhone offers. Does this mean that EMR companies should build a special iPhone interface for doctors?

This is an important question for almost every EMR company. Even client server based EMR products need to ask themselves if they should build a special web based interface for the iPhone. Just because your a client server based EMR doesn’t mean that you can’t build another interface using web based technology. The question is should you?

The answer to the question becomes rather clear when you think about what advantages a doctor receives by being able to access their EMR on an iPhone. Most doctors have NEVER accessed their EMR on their phone. Those doctors I know that have accessed their EMR on their phone fall into one of the following two camps:
1. Tired of scrolling
The first category of EMR users said that accessing their EMR on a phone was painstaking because the scrolling was a constant annoyance. I think we’re all getting spoiled with big 19″ monitors. I know I’ve connected to some of my servers using a phone and scrolling was the biggest problem for me. So much so that I never tried it again. A number of companies are working on roll up screens, but until that happens scrolling seems apart of an internet phone experience. Certainly some could argue that with the iPhone you have an easier method of scrolling. This is certainly true, but it still only slightly diminishes the pains of scrolling in my book.
2. Just meds and allergies
This group seems sensible. What if an EMR vendor offered a small subset of the EMR that was available on the iPhone (or any cellular phone for that matter). Knowing someone’s medications and allergies would be nice to have available on your phone when your visiting a hospital. Why not be able to browse your EMR’s schedule of appointments on your iPhone. Many people probably do that now, but I’m not talking about synching your phone with your calendar. I’m talking about a true real time view of your appointments for that day. Would certainly be a nice way to prevent the doctor getting upset with someone from the front desk because his calendar wasn’t up to date with what was stored in the EMR.

It’s easy to see the advantages of offering a subset of your EMR information on the phone. There’s a lot of things that are useful that won’t ever happen. Unfortunately, I think this is one of those features. At least for now, I don’t know many doctors who are asking for phone integration as part of the EMR RFP process. EMR vendors are in the business of selling EMR software. If their users aren’t demanding it, then I don’t see many EMR vendors providing it.

No, I won’t be surprised if some EMR vendor comes out with an iPhone interface. Some EMR companies could do it rather quickly because of the way their EMR is designed and they might as well enjoy a little bit of PR benefit from having an iPhone application. I’ll be excited to see what that company provides, but don’t count on many EMR vendors to follow suit. It just wouldn’t be smart business for most.

One final thought. The iPhone has been a real internet darling that has garnered lots of good press. It’s what Steve Jobs is great at doing and the iPhone is no exception. The problem is that the last time I checked, the iPhone was less than 2% of all the phones sold in the US. The incredible user interface of the iPhone can’t be argued. The problem is that software companies very rarely want to develop software for 2% of the market. Until iPhone establishes user interface standards that other companies adopt, don’t expect EMR companies to start developing software for the iPhone.

EMR and EHR Software and Dragon Naturally Speaking

Posted on February 19, 2008 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent comment, Tom Hamilton from KnowBrainer software sent some interesting insights about using Dragon Naturally Speaking. His observation about more and more physicians using Dragon Naturally Speaking with their EMR or EHR is very true. I expect this trend to continue for quite a while. I don’t know how many times doctors have asked me for this ability. Unfortunately, it is like any software program and takes some getting use to, but those that do get use to it seem to really love it.

Here’s what Tom sent me. I hope it’s valuable for those looking at voice recognition with their EMR or EHR. I always welcome guest posters who want to post information like this to my blog. If you’re an expert at something related to EMR, EHR, or other Healthcare IT related topics, then let me know if you’re interested in being a guest blogger.

EMR Software and Dragon NaturallySpeaking are being utilized together in more practices and by more physicians every year. In light of that fact I would like to offer this information to the curious.

1. If you’re using Vista you should have 3-4 GB of RAM. For an XP platform you will require 2 GB of RAM. The software will run on less but won’t be very as effective.

NOTE: If you’re looking at buying a new computer to use with DNS I would consider looking at ASUS computers. Regardless of what system you by, you want a Core2 Duo 2 GHz or better CPU speed, 2 GB of RAM an XP platform (3 GB on Vista), 2 – 4 MB of L2 cache, a SATA hard drive of at least 100 GB although you may be able get 160 for about the same price. Your soundcard will be important so go with a mid to high end Soundblaster.

2. Unless you’re using a Soundblaster card don’t depend on the integrated soundcard in your computer as it is probably poorly shielded. Get yourself an external soundcard (USB Pod) and use a USB port on the back of your computer as opposed to the front.

3. Here is a copy of the manual we wrote for version 9. It’s designed as version 9.5 upgrade manual but if you are a new user to DNS you can download a full copy manual at KnowBrainer.com. KnowBrainer Manual

4. Here is a copy of the KnowBrainer Quick Tips which is PDF help file for day to day troubleshooting that is updated all the time from questions answered on our forum.

5. Here is a copy of our DNS 9 Review. I think you’ll find it pretty thorough.

6. For research feel free to use the KnowBrainer Speech Recognition Forum as it is by far the largest and most active of its kind.

7. I know there are quite a few users of NaturallySpeaking version 9 who don’t know about the Free upgrade to 9.5. Then there are some that do but don’t have time to find a path to it and worry about difficulty installing it. You should always use the most updated software especially when it’s free. Version 9.5 consolidates the code between version 9 and 9.1 and contains a few minor tweaks. The main purpose for the upgrade is for Vista compatibility. Here is your path and instructions – DNS 9.5 Update Guide

KnowBrainer, Inc. Support Staff – Tom Hamilton
Now Providing FREE (1st 5 min.) Tech Support 615-884-4558
A Nuance Gold Certified Endorsed Vendor
ALWAYS Ask If Your Speech Recognition Vendor Is Nuance Certified

Thanks Tom for the information. I think I’m going to have to “borrow” the dragon naturally speaking software one of my users cast aside and try it for myself.

Check out the following prices for the various versions of DNS on Amazon:
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 10 Preferred – Currently $151.49 with $50 rebate ($101.49 after rebate)
Dragon NaturallySpeaking 9 Preferred – Currently $92.97
I’m still looking around for the best location to buy Dragon NaturallySpeaking Medical.