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10 Years of Blogging – The HealthBlawg

Posted on June 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My friend and colleague, David Harlow, is celebrating an important milestone on his blog. It’s the 10th anniversary of his HealthBlawg. That’s a long time in blog years. I know since I just passed my 10 year anniversary last year as well. It’s amazing for me to think back on all those years and the things I’ve learned from David’s posts on HealthBlawg.

In true David Harlow fashion, he’s doing a great 10 year celebration of HealthBlawg with what he’s calling the Festschrift of the Blogosphere. As part of that celebration, he’s invited other bloggers (including myself) to write posts in the HealthBlawg’s Tenth Blogiversary. I loved the idea since in many ways it took me back to the early days of blogging (before Twitter and other social media) where we all connected with each other on blogs.

I think David still has a number of other posts coming from guest bloggers, but I thought I’d highlight a few of them which I found extremely interesting.

First up is Dr. Nick van Terheyden’s post called “Channeling Churchill to deal with innovation, impatience and chaos in healthcare“. The whole post is great and worth a read, but this part stood out to me in particular:

Everything you thought you knew about how to make your organization financially successful will change. Profit centers like radiology and diagnostic imaging will become cost centers; the more high-end expensive care you give, which once supported all the more mundane services you provide, the lower your profits will be. Instead of filling beds, your job will be to keep them empty.

It’s a big challenge, but the same kind of augmented intelligence systems that will help physicians keep patients healthy can help you keep your organization healthy. Analytics can help you identify and stratify risk, so that you can contract with payers at rates that won’t kill your bottom line. And it can help you identify gaps in care that could lead to the need for expensive treatments and procedures.

It’s going to take a while for organizations to really process what Dr. Nick is saying. In fact, I don’t think most will and they’ll be blindsided when it happens. Talk about a dramatic shift in thinking and Dr. Nick described it so well. Combine this with Dr. Nick’s opening comments about the shifting consumer expectations and we’re in for some big changes.

Another post honoring the HealthBlawg that stood out to me was e-Patient Dave’s post called “Gimme my DaM Data: liberating to patients, scary to some.” I’d heard most of Dave’s story before, but he offered a few insights into it that I’d never heard before. However, his message is still just as compelling today as it was when he first blogging about his data issues back in 2009.

It’s too bad these things are still issues because I wish we could put e-Patient Dave out of business. Ok, that might sound harsh, but I think he wants to be put out of business too. No one would be happier than him if the culture around our health data were changed. I’m sure he’d find something else worth advocating for if we solved the problem of patient access to data.

If you’re not familiar with e-Patient Dave, here’s a section of his post which illustrates the problem and his goal:

Some old-schoolers are threatened by patients seeing the chart; some even think it’s none of your business. Twenty years ago Seinfeld episode 139 showed Elaine looking at her chart and seeing she’d been marked “difficult.” The doctor took the chart from her hands: back then she had no legal right to see it… so she sent Kramer to get it, impersonating a doctor.

You should get your data – all of it. It may not be easy – some providers are severely out of date about your legal rights, and some resist for other reasons: some feel threatened, some know there are gross errors in the chart, some charts contain insults, and some contain flat-out billing fraud: conditions you don’t have, but they’ve been billing your insurance for.

When your doctor hesitates to give you your data, which reasons do they have? Only one way to find out.

I have to admit that reading Dave’s story again has me inspired to spend more time and effort in that space myself and on this blog.

If you’d like to see the post I did, it’s called “Integrated Health – People Finally Caring About Their Health and Not Even Realizing It.” Here’s an excerpt from my post:

While most people will tell you they care about their health, their actions say otherwise. The reality is that the rest of our life is full of bright shiny objects and so it’s really easy for us to get distracted. However, there’s a coming revolution of health care that is totally integrated into your life that’s going to help us care about our health and we won’t even realize it is happening.

If you were to ask someone if they cared about their health, 100% of people would say they do. In fact, you’d likely hear the majority of people go on to say that if they didn’t have their health, then they wouldn’t have anything. While we are happy to publicly proclaim our desire for health, our actions often send a very different message.

Thanks David for inspiring us all with your work at HealthBlawg. You’re a good man (which can be hard to say for a lawyer…sorry I had to have at least one lawyer joke) that is working hard to make a difference in healthcare. I look forward to another decade of blogging alongside you.

Happy Memorial Day!

Posted on May 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the US, today is Memorial Day. It’s a bit ironic that I’m writing about Memorial Day in the US while I’m teaching an EHR workshop in Dubai. While I love international travel, experiencing other cultures and meeting people with different perspectives, the travel also reminds me how lucky I am to live where I live and do what I do. There are a lot of amazing people who have lost their lives in order for that to be possible for me. I’m thinking about that this Memorial Day.

This never hit home more to me than when I saw this Memorial Day post by Dr. Nick. It included the following image:
Memorial Day Image

I’ll admit that the image is a bit shocking and heart wrenching for me to look at. Although, I’m not sure that’s such a bad thing. It’s important to remember the amazing warriors who have fought for our freedom throughout the years. Happy Memorial Day everyone!

Digital Health at CES Wrap Up Video

Posted on January 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CES 2015 is now in the headlights. One person I talked to said they thought that the event was missing some of the excitement of previous years. I disagreed with him. I thought it was more exciting than previous years. Although, my excitement comes from the entrepreneurs and the Digital Health space. If you look at the larger CES floor with the massive million dollar booths, it was lacking some luster. Of course, with the size of CES, it’s easy to understand why two people could have very different experiences.

If you’re interested about what else I found at CES, I sat down with Dr. Nick van Terheyden, CMIO at Nuance, to talk about our experiences at CES 2015 and some of the takeaways from what we saw. I think you’ll enjoy this CES 2015 video chat below:

Initial CES 2015 Observations

Posted on January 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday was the start of the International CES (Consumer Electronics Show) 2015 conference in Las Vegas. My friend Dr. Nick from Nuance posted these stats for the CES conference:

For those interested CES attracts 150,000 visitors (they are all flying on the same planes and looking for the same cabs as me it would appear), occupied 2,000,000 square feet of space (35 football fields – American or the rest of the world soccer) and includes 3,500 companies

That gives you a small glimpse into the vastness of the CES event. Yesterday I had a chance to go to the CES press only event called CES Unveiled. It is a small subset of what you’ll find at the larger CES event. Based on this experience and the rash of press releases that have been sent my way for CES, here’s my prediction on the top 3 themes for CES 2015:

  • 3D Printers
  • Drones
  • Wearables

Healthcare has some place in the 3D Printing world, but I don’t expect much of that to be on display at CES. Unless we’re talking about drones that deliver medication to patients, there’s not as much applicability for drones in healthcare (although, they are cool). The wearables space on the other hand is largely about healthcare. There are some non-healthcare applications in wearables, but the majority of wearable applications I’ve seen are for healthcare or have some health and wellness component.

What’s Happening With Wearables?
As I browsed the various wearables yesterday, I noticed that the number of wearable options has proliferated. Companies I’d never heard about had their own wearable product that they were just launching at CES. Plus, the big health wearable players were offering more and more options to consumers. Along with this trend, we’re also seeing a trend to sexier wearables. I’ve seen a number of partnerships between fashion houses and wearable companies. This isn’t surprising since we want our wearable to match our own personal style. The previous options were limited.

I was also interested in many of the ambient sensors that were put alongside other wearables. I can see many companies linking the ambient sensor data with other wearable data to help in your health and wellness. We’ll see where this trend goes.

The most interesting health and wellness wearable I saw was the AmpStrip by FitLinxx (pictured below). The AmpStrip tracks heart rate, activity, respiration, skin temperature and posture all within a device as discrete and comfortable as a Band-Aid®. I think this is a step towards the invisible area of wearables. No one is going to see that you’re wearing it and it’s continuously monitoring your health data. It was susprising to me that they were able to get a tracker like this packaged into something so thin. I thought they’d need something much more bulky, but it was quite thin.
AmpStrip Wearable at CES 2015
I certainly haven’t dug into the science of the AmpStrip, but I like the approach to discreet health and wellness monitoring. They told me that the adhesive had to be replaced every 5-6 days. I wonder if that becomes a really easy task or if it starts to annoy over time. I’m also interested to know about the software that’s tied to the sensor. I’ve known FitLinxx for a while now through their pebble activity tracker. They didn’t have a direct to consumer approach with the Pebble, but they do now with the AmpStrip. I’ll be interested to see how well they do creating the app for the consumer world. Considering their IndieGogo campaign has reached it’s goal in 6 days, they’ll have an opportunity to see how they can do with it.

CES is just getting started. We’ll be back with more to report on as the week progresses. If you’re here as well, I’d love to hear your observations.

EHR Expert Jobs, Healthcare Social Media, MU Attestation Data

Posted on March 31, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I guess Cleveland Clinic doesn’t think the government trained EHR workforce. I know a lot of them that can’t get a job in any EHR position.


This story is a crazy one and spiral out of control is the right term. Although, this post by Amanda Blum is the best look at the issues from my point of view. Dr. Nick is right that you do have to be careful. In fact, the case above wasn’t even something that happened on social media. It was something that happened in person at a conference and then social media blew it up. So, I’d actually argue that it’s more important than ever for you to be involved in social media. That way if something does blow up, you see it and can deal with the situation before it spins out of control.

What I do hate most about the story is the lack of civility and not giving people the benefit of the doubt. I hate that part of the way society is heading. Communication can solve a lot of issues if people would just use it. Instead, we assume the worst in people. That’s unfortunate.


Evan’s opening line to the blog post says, “CMS just released the December 2012 attestation data, and one thing is abundantly clear—many EHR vendors will not be around to see Stage 2.” I don’t agree with his conclusion. I expect we’ll have nearly as many in meaningful use stage 2 as we did in stage 1. Meaningful Use stage 3 is likely where we’re going to see fallout. Although, it does beg the question of how many EHR vendors will stay in business without EHR incentive money?

I’ve often said that it’s surprising how good of a business you can run with just a few thousand doctors.