Eyes Wide Shut – Is This Meaningful Use?

Posted on September 25, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a hardcore health data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, which she brings to her role as Dell Health’s Analytics Solutions Lead. She fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

Again and again, I find myself expounding upon the need to differentiate between the “letter of the law” and the “spirit of the law” of Meaningful Use Stage 2. I believe whole-heartedly in the transformative power of health IT, and support the future vision of the Meaningful Use objectives of patient empowerment and nationwide standards for records transmission and interoperability. The spirit of the “law” is a revolutionary movement towards a technology-enabled, patient-centric healthcare system, where clinical data can be shared and consumed instantly, whenever patient desires or requires it.

The letter of the “law” is daunting, and its implementation could be seen as not only counter-revolutionary, but detrimental to the very patient population it is designed to engage and empower.

Consider this acute care scenario:

You’re a hospital healthcare provider, discharging a patient, in compliance with the patient-specific education and Summary of Care measures. You log in to your EMR, complete the discharge instructions in the correlated workflow, print the discharge summary and any condition-specific educational information for the patient, revisit their room to insure that they can review the instructions and ask any questions, and you’re on to assessing the condition of the next patient in need of care. Right?

How many times did you have to close the “patient-specific education” suggestion windows that popped up, alerting you to available materials for download, keyed off diagnosis codes or lab results?

How many minutes did you spend looking for the HISP address of the patient’s cardiologist, so you could transmit the Summary of Care document to them via the Direct module of your EMR? How many clicks did you have to use to FIND the Direct module in your EMR? And how many minutes did you spend cursing the ONC for requiring Direct for Summary of Care transmission for 10% of your discharged patient population when the cardiologist’s address was rejected by the Direct module, giving you a message that the receiver is not DirectTrust-accredited?

How much time did the discharge process take you before your facility decided to attest to Meaningful Use Stage 2? How much time does it take you now?
Consider this ambulatory care scenario:

You’re support staff for a general practitioner, who is deploying a patient portal in support of patient engagement measures. At check-in (or check-out), you provide the patients with the URL for enrollment and access, give them information on the benefits of having their medical records available electronically, encourage them to communicate electronically with their provider with questions or concerns, and you send them on their empowered and engaged way.

How many minutes did you spend validating each portal account owner’s identity once their enrollment request came? How many minutes did you spend validating the relationship of the portal account owner to each of the patients he/she requests to associate with the account? How did you document the due diligence done to insure no medical records are improperly released per HIPAA and other federal guidelines, as in the case of custodial disputes, behavioral health patients, or emancipated minors?

How many minutes did you spend walking patients through the enrollment, login, medical records view, and secure message functions? How much time did you spend answering questions from patients about the portal, rather than the health concerns that prompted the visit?

How much time did the check-out process take before your GP decided to attest to Meaningful Use Stage 2? How much time does it take you now?

In both of these scenarios, did you or the patient see any measurable difference in care as a result of the EMR’s new functionality?

Now, consider the aggregate of these scenarios over an entire day – dozens of encounters, dozens of clicks, dozens of minutes spent engaging the EMR to record requisite “clicks” for attestation numerator reporting, rather than engaging the patient.

Is this meaningful use of a healthcare provider’s time and energy? Is this meaningful use of health IT, meeting very specific targets to obtain finite objectives rather than enabling innovation and deriving best practice long-term solutions?

Is this what the ONC intended?