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Is the SHIN-NY “Public Utility” HIE Funding a Model for Other HIE?

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I first started working with the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) many years ago when they first organized the Digital Health Conference many years ago. Hopefully they’ll have me back again this year since I’ve really enjoyed our ongoing partnership. Plus, it’s a great way for me to get a deeper look into the New York Health IT landscape.

While NYeC organizes this conference, has an accelerator, and is (is this a was yet?) even a REC, the core of everything they do is around their HIE called the SHIN-NY. Unlike some states who don’t have any HIE or RHIO, New York has 10 regional health information exchanges (formerly and for some people still called RHIOs). The SHIN-NY is the platform which connects all of the state’s RHIOs into one connected health network. Plus, I know they’re working on some other more general initiatives that share and get data from organizations outside of New York as well.

While the SHIN-NY has been worked on and sending data for a number of years, the news just came out that Governor Cuomo included $55 million in state funding for the SHIN-NY HIE. This is a unique funding model and it makes me wonder how many other states will follow their lead. Plus, you have to juxtapose this funding with my own state of Nevada’s decision to stop funding the state HIE that was supported with a lot of federal government funds as well.

In my HIE experience, I’ve found that every state is unique in how they fund and grow their HIE. Much of it often has to do with the cultural norms of the state. For example, New York is use to high state taxes that support a number of government programs. Nevada on the other hand is use to no state tax and government funding largely coming from the hospital and gaming sectors. Plus, this doesn’t even take into account the local healthcare bureaucracies and idiosyncrasies that exist.

What do you think of this type of HIE funding model? Do you wish your state would do something similar? Will we see other states follow New York’s example?

I’m excited to see how NY, NYeC and the SHIN-NY do with this HIE funding. Knowing many of the leaders in that organization, I think they’re going to be a great success and have a real impact for good on healthcare in NY.

April 25, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Prediction: AHIMA 2013 Will Be ICD-10 All Day All the Time

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This will be my third year in a row attending the AHIMA Annual Conference (I think they call it the AHIMA Convention) which starts on Monday in Atlanta. I’m particularly excited for this year’s event because I have so many healthcare IT friends in Atlanta. Plus, I always have a great time at the event and learn a lot.

This year we’ll actually have three different Healthcare Scene bloggers (Jennifer Dennar, Mandi Bishop, and myself). So you can be sure to get some really varied coverage from the event from a number of different perspectives.

As I consider all the pitches I’ve gotten and think about the work of AHIMA, I can already tell that AHIMA 2013 is going to be dominated by one topic: ICD-10.

I honestly don’t think it’s even going to be close. I believe this is a very good thing. Hopefully the focus of attention on ICD-10 a little less than a year out from the ICD-10 implementation date is a good thing for the industry. You can be sure I’ll be doing what I can to help people better understand how they can prepare for ICD-10 and some of the tools out there.

Assuming I’m not too overwhelmed with all the AHIMA ICD-10 talk, next week I’d like to start a weekly series of posts on ICD-10. It feels right to call it ICD-10 Tuesdays. So, look forward to that series in the future.

Also, Agency Ten22 is holding the third annual tweet up at AHIMA on Tuesday evening. You can find more details and RSVP here. I’m reminded of the first tweetup. Beth from Agency Ten22 told me she had a nice suite. I told her I’d bring some Twitter friends and the AHIMA tweetup was born. Big thanks to Beth and her team for carrying on the tradition.

Finally, the rest of my travel for this year is booked. I’ll be at the Digital Health Conference (20% discount if you use the code HCS) in NYC in November and at the mHealth Summit in Washington DC in December. I hope to see many of you at one of these events.

October 25, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Digital Health Conference in NYC

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dhc_2013_header_580px
As most of you know, I’ve been working with the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) for the past couple years on their Digital Health Conference. They buy some advertising on my websites, and I get the chance to attend an amazing event. I love this event, because NYeC has a great connection with the local community of doctors and hospitals and so the event is chalk full of those working in the trenches of healthcare. I expect this year to be no different.

The good news is that once again they’ve given readers of my websites a 20% registration discount. Just use the code HCS when registering at www.DigitalHealthConference.com.

They’ve lined up two keynote speakers for the event: George C. Halvorson, Chairman, Kaiser Permanente and Jim Messina, National Director, Organizing for Action; Campaign Manager, 2012 Obama Re-Election Campaign; Deputy Chief of Staff to President Obama. I like the mix of someone deeply rooted in healthcare and also someone who likely understands healthcare politics really well.

Along with the keynotes, I’m told they are looking at about 1200 attendees at the event. They’ve also published the full agenda of speakers. I look forward to seeing many of my readers at the event.

Along with the Digital Health Conference, I’ll be attending a number of other Healthcare IT conferences this year. Influential Networks has created a calendar of Fall health IT events where you’ll find myself and other influencers. Right now I have MGMA, CHIME, Healthcare Payments Processing & Compliance Summit, AHIMA, and the Digital Health Conference on my dance card. I may add mHealth Summit as well. Should make for an exciting fall conference season.

Let me know if you’ll be at any of these conferences. I always love to connect with readers in person.

September 5, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

This Week in Health Innovation and The Coming Mobile Health Startup Revolution

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After the great experience many of us had at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event, Gregg Masters asked if Shahid Shah (my partner in Influential Networks) and I would take part in an online interview he does called This Week in Health Innovation. This is one element of the Health Innovation Broadcast Consortium that Gregg and a few others have put together. We had a great 30 minute conversation about some of the major trends we saw happening in healthcare IT and then we even went into an overtime discussion for another 10 minutes. The time flew by in our discussion, but I think there were some really good nuggets shared in the interview. You can listen to the full interview in the embed below.

Listen to This Week in Health Innovation on Blog Talk Radio

I was also recently asked to do a guest blog post for the NYEC (New York eHealth Collaborative) blog. First, I have to say that I love that their blogging. Second, as many of you know, I’ve been participating in the Digital Health Conference in NYC that the NYEC puts on every year. It is a really great event.

With that background, I think that many of my readers will enjoy my guest post titled “The Coming Mobile Health Startup Revolution.” This is really coming, but I don’t think it’s going to come as most current mobile health people expect. A long series of incremental technology advancements have us prepped for an explosion of innovation in healthcare. I just hope that the healthcare structure doesn’t slow it down.

April 5, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EMR Add-On’s that Provide Physician Benefit

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One of the companies I met in New York City at the Digital Health Conference was MedCPU. I had a great time talking with the effervescent Founder and President, Sonia Ben-Yehuda and the Founder and CEO, Eyal Ephrat, MD. MedCPU is part of the inaugural New York Digital Health Accelerator class. Plus, they’ve created a pretty interesting concept and way to simplify their message down to a single button that analyzes both free text notes and structured data to check for compliance to best practice guidelines or for deviations from expected care.

The idea of a single button that does all the work is a decent one. Sure, real time analysis is good as well, but EHR software isn’t there yet and won’t be for a while to come. Very few EHR seem to be offering real time meaningful use compliance checking. Forget about real time clinical compliance checking.

What I found even more interesting was something that MedCPU told me when they were describing their product. Dr. Ephrat told me that one hospital was using the services MedCPU provides as the benefit that doctors will receive for using EHR. I find this concept quite interesting. I won’t belabor the point that EHR is the database of healthcare, but it’s amazing to consider that a third party application could provide enough benefit to be the reason why doctors want an EHR.

Many EHR vendors realize this is true. That’s why many are trying to offer API (application interfaces) which will allow third party vendors to interact and integrate with their EHR. I wonder what apps can be created by third parties that would really take EHR software to the next level. A thriving third party eco-system of developers can be much more powerful than trying to do all the innovation in house.

Do you know of other EHR add-ons that provide the real benefits physicians want out of an EHR? I’d love to hear of ones you think fit that test.

November 21, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Meaningful Use the Commodity – Meaningful Use Monday

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I decided to take a step back this week for Meaningful Use Monday to look at where we are in the new world of health IT which includes the commonplace terms of EHR incentive money and meaningful use. Plus, I’m probably waxing a bit nostalgic today as I think about the David Brailer keynote at the Digital Health Conference today (follow my tweets on @ehrandhit for more coverage) where he spoke a bit about the origins of healthcare IT.

At this point it seems that meaningful use has become basically a commodity. There are very few EHR vendors out there now that aren’t certified EHR that can help a physician get to meaningful use (Although there are some non-certified EHR still). Basically, if you are doing EHR, then more than likely you are doing meaningful use. Or at least you’ll have that opportunity if you want. Some would argue that means that this result is a function of the meaningful use bar being set too low.

In fact, that is largely what the congressmen’s argument was in their letter to HHS about halting meaningful use. The real question is whether this is a problem. I personally don’t mind all the EHR competition. I think it would have been worse if the government incentive, meaningful use, and the RECs essentially narrowed the field of EHR vendors down to only a few.

The argument on the other side is around the “paradox of choice.” There’s little doubt that many practices are in a situation where there are so many EHR choices that they make the decision not to choose. However, I see this more as an excuse not to do EHR from people who didn’t really want to do EHR in the first place. I’m not sure these people would have been doing EHR even if there were only a few choices.

This does leave us with a challenging problem going forward. The EHR churn rate is going to go through the roof. David Brailer pointed this out today in his keynote and he’s right that it’s already happening today. Although, the majority of the EHR churn that’s happening now is from those organizations that are going after meaningful use. The major EHR churn rate of the future is going to come from EHR consolidation.

What does this all mean? Now more than ever, an organization needs to do good due diligence on the stability of the EHR software. Notice that I didn’t say EHR vendor. Just because you’re a large EHR vendor that’s financially stable doesn’t mean that the EHR software is safe (see Exhibit A and Exhibit B).

One thing is clear though, meaningful use and EHR are here to stay. There’s no escaping EHR. We’re finally back to the point where doctors are no longer asking if they should do EHR. Instead, they’re asking how, when and which EHR they should do. This is a very good industry trend.

October 15, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare Social Media Happenings

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Seems like each day I’m getting more and more involved in healthcare social media. Although, as I was preparing for the social media panel at the Digital Health Conference in New York City (Final day to register for the event is Friday.) I realized that I no longer think about social media. It’s just an integral part of what I do and how I interact with the people around me. It’s a really satisfying feeling to think about social media now just being a natural part of my life and my work.

Digital Health Conference in New York City
For those of you who can’t attend the conference in New York, you can still follow along through social media at #dhc12 and during our social media session we’ll likely use #dhc12sm. For those who say they’re not on Twitter, you don’t have to be to follow the Twitter stream. Just click the links and enjoy the tweets. I did this for Health 2.0 since I couldn’t make it to San Francisco and a number of people in the #health2con twitter stream commented on how following a conference on Twitter was better than being there in person. I’d say it’s almost better, not quite better.

New York City Tweetup for Digital Health Conference
There’s still real value in face to face, but Twitter and other social media can enable the face to face as well. In fact, if you’re in or around NYC, we’re doing a Tweetup on Monday, Oct 15th from 5-7 PM at The Half King. You can see all the details and RSVP for the event here. 16 people already on the list, and certainly many more will show that learn about it at the conference or on Twitter. Everyone’s welcome to come.

Hosting #HITsm Chat
I also got an invite to host the #HITsm chat this week. What that means is that you’ll find me tweeting at Noon EST on Friday about 4 topics with some really smart people in healthcare IT. Many people like to participate using the #HITsm Tweetchat page (I usually use Hootsuite myself). I encourage readers to carve out some time on Friday morning and join in. Twitter chats are a beautiful mix of information, connection and collaboration.

As this week’s moderator, I was responsible for picking the 4 topics we discuss this week. I tried to pull the topics from a few of the major headlines and innovations I’d seen and written about recently. I expect these 4 topics are going to drive some really interesting discussion. Here they are for those who want to know what to expect from Friday’s chat:

1: A few in congress called for a halt on EHR incentives. Is this politics or something more? Are their observations founded?

For more information on the letter from the congressmen and some industry reaction, seeCongressmen Want Halt on Meaningful Use Payments.

2: Allscripts is the 2nd EHR vendor to discontinue their small practice EHR(MyWay), is this a trend and what’s the impact?

The news came out late last week that Allscripts had chosen to discontinue their popular MyWay EHR and try and transition those users to the Allscripts Professional EHR.  This is the second time an EHR vendor has sunset their small practice EHR in favor of their “enterprise” EHR.  GE Centricity Advance was the first example of a small practice EHR being sunset.

3: Is the hospital bed the ultimate medical device monitor?  What other med device monitors do you see on the horizon?

In this interview, Casey Pittock of BAM Labs makes a compelling case for the possibilities of what can be done with new smart bed technology.  The hospital bed is a unique opportunity for device monitoring.  What challenges does it have and what other device monitors have a lot of potential for healthcare?

4: What do you think of the remotoscope which allows you to diagnose ear infections at home using your iPhone?

Georgia Tech and Emory university created a clip-on attachment and app for the iPhone which turns it into an otoscope.  It is still going through clinical trials, but has the potential to avoid office visits for ear infections.  The remotoscope software includes the option to send the picture captured to your doctor for review.

I hope to see many of you on the #HITsm Twitter chat and in person in New York City!

October 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Great Digital Health Conference in New York City

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As many of you know, last year I made the trip to New York City for the Digital Health Conference. You can see my Digital Health Conference Twitter round up from 2011 to get a feel for the conference. It’s a great event put together by the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC).

I’m really excited to be able to attend the conference again in 2012. The 2012 Digital Health Conference is happening October 15-16, 2012 in New York, NY.

They’ve announced 2 keynote speakers: David J. Brailer, MD, Ph.D., Chairman, Health Evolution Partners and Stephen J. Dubner, Bestselling Author, Freakonomics and Superfreakonomics. As most of you know, I love hearing from former government health IT leaders, like David Brailer, once they’re out of that position. They can provide insights that they couldn’t say when working for the government. Plus, Freakonomics is just awesome. I’m excited to see Stephen Dubner speak in person.

I’ve also been asked to be part of a Healthcare Social Media panel at the conference that will include Brian Ahier, Ed Bennett, and Amy Dixon. I know Brian Ahier quite well (he moderated my HIMSS panel), but I only know of Ed Bennett and Amy Dixon. I think that often leads to the best panels since you get a number of varied viewpoints. Plus, you all know I love to talk about social media.

I’m also really excited to hear more about NYeC’s work with HIE, RECs and even a healthcare IT accelerator. It will be really interesting to get a perspective from an organization that is working in so many areas I love. I think their accelerator is fascinating and could produce some amazing results.

The organizers of the Digital Health Conference have provided a discount code for Healthcare Scene readers that provides you a 20% registration discount. All you need to do is enter the code HCS when you register.

The hash tag for the event is #DHC12 for those of you not able to attend, but want to follow the conference remotely.

While I love the healthcare IT super conferences, I also love going to a high quality conference like the Digital Health Conferences where you get a chance to dig in deep with a lot of the attendees. I love the depth and variety that I got at last year’s conference and I expect to get the same this year. Plus, I’ve already heard of a number of amazing people that are planning to attend.

If you plan to go, I’d love to know so we can meet. Maybe we’ll have to put together another Tweetup!

UPDATE: @healthcarewen took the initiative and put together a tweetup.

July 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

A Possible Mobile Health App to Compliment EMR #mhs11

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One of the really interesting companies that I’ve seen at both the Digital Health Conference in NYC and now at the mHealth Summit in DC is a company called Force Therapeutics. This company is part of the Startup Health crew of companies and have a pretty interesting product for ensuring patient compliance using a really cool mobile and web based app.

Force Therapeutics is their first product which is focused on physical therapists which is a smart first step since the founder is a physical therapist. At its core, Force Therapeutics is an application where a physical therapist can “prescribe” exercises that need to be done by their patients. Those doing the exercises can log into the app and see the video demonstrating the exercise and then mark down whether they did the exercise or not. By having the video present during the exercise, it helps the patient to perform the exercise properly and then the physical therapist can know how well their patients are complying with the exercises they prescribed.

The app is available on the web or on the iPad and I believe Android. Plus, they offer a pretty cool online store where physical therapists can direct their patients to purchase the various products they need to do the physical therapy. I imagine that could be a nice revenue stream for Force Therapeutics and could be really convenient for physical therapists and patients.

Force Therapeutics also has a consumer version of their application available on the app store that could enable those interested in trying some physical therapy exercises without going to their doctor or the physical therapist. This feels wrong for many in the US who are so use to needing a doctors referral to go to physical therapy. Could be an interesting play for Force Therapeutics to help out with those aches and pains that we all have (and are getting more the older we get) that aren’t worthy of a doctor, but could benefit from some mild “therapy.” I’m sure this will have many doctors and physical therapists cringing a little bit, but whether it’s Force Therapeutics is used or some other app, there’s little doubt that patients will be doing this sort of self directed therapy anyway.

As I saw an app like Force Therapeutics, I could see it as a nice add on to EMR software. My only fear is that it feels more like a feature of an EMR software as opposed to a product unto its own. Although, I think Force Therapeutics has a chance for a number of different reasons.

First, I don’t see many EMR vendors really diving into this space. Sure, some might do some pieces of this, but they have so many things on their development plate that I think it’s unlikely for most EHR software vendors to develop these type of features.

Second, physical therapy is a space where EMR hasn’t gone very much. Sure, there’s WebPT, but most physical therapists are still in the paper world. The EHR incentive money passed over physical therapists and so it seems that many of them will continue sitting on the sidelines. That leaves a great opportunity for niche apps to satisfy the needs of these niche providers.

Plus, when I talked to the Force Therapeutics founder, I think that one of their biggest opportunities is outside the physical therapy space. Sure, it would be easy to expand Force Therapeutics into orthopedics or other medical specialty that wants to measure and support compliance in treatment. However, even more interesting to me is the idea of a Force Fitness type of app that focuses on trainers and exercise. When you start to think about trainers need to monitor their client’s exercise habits it makes a lot of since. In fact, if played right, Force Fitness could become a network that connects trainers with those interested in finding a personal trainer. Considering the amount of money spent on exercise each year, this is a really tremendous opportunity.

It’s still early in the life of something like Force Therapeutics, but it’s a pretty interesting little insight into the future of how various apps could impact healthcare. One of the panel speakers at the mHealth Summit said that there were 17,000 healthcare apps on the market today. I’m not sure where he got his number, but no matter how you slice it that’s a lot of healthcare apps. Multiply an app like Force Therapeutics by 17,000 and you can see there’s a sea of change happening in the mobile health space.

December 6, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Thoughts and Comments from Digital Health Conference in New York

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I think people have enjoyed a collection of my best tweets from the healthcare IT and EMR conferences I’ve been attending. If you don’t like them, let me know in the comments. I think they’re interesting since they’re nuggets of interesting topics. The following tweets come from the Digital Health Conference in New York. It’s been a really well attended event and includes a lot of the real health IT movers and shakers in the New York healthcare scene. Plus, they’ve had some really great content as well.

Here goes (with my comments after the tweet):

Healthcare.gov is an interesting site. Still too new to decide its impact though.

Todd Park did make a pretty compelling case for the healthcare data they’re going to make available from the government and it seems like they’re just getting started. I could see a lot of startups leverage that data in their companies. I wonder what assurance an entrepreneur will get that the data won’t get yanked.

Simple examples like this is why mobile health is so fascinating.

Todd Park really did do a great job. Attendees were commenting on how good he’d done all day. As Matthew Browning said, Practice Makes Perfect!

Obviously a lot of interest in the HIE stuff and in the notifications that they can do.

I know that NYC is large and has a lot of people, but I’m having a hard time understanding how it has 4 RHIO. Are there 4 regions in NYC? I’m sure there’s a long political story behind it.

This is why we’ll always need doctors. It’s just how they do what they do that will change.

Such a good point. If they were actually getting all that information then they’d have reason to complain. Although, we can’t make the systems filter the flood properly when there’s no flood.

Great funding story. I bet there’s even more to it than he shared. I’ll have to get him to share the rest some time.

Great quote from Matthew. I don’t mind a little slow dancing, but the dance floor usually empties for the slow songs and is hopping with the rock songs. This is a pretty systemic problem in healthcare. I met one healthcare salesperson who said he was just contacted about a deal he’d worked on 3 years ago with a hospital. They contacted him to say that they’d finally closed the deal. Too bad this sales person is no longer at the company.

December 1, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.