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Vocera Aims For More Intelligent Hospital Interventions

Posted on November 14, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Everyday scenes that Vocera Communications would like to eliminate from hospitals:

  • A nurse responds to an urgent change in the patient’s condition. While the nurse is caring for the patient, monitors continue to go off with alerts about the situation, distracting her and increasing the stress for both herself and the patient.

  • A monitor beeps in response to a dangerous change in a patient’s condition. A nurse pages the physician in charge. The physician calls back to the nurse’s station, but the nurse is off on another task. They play telephone tag while patient needs go unmet around the floor.

  • A nurse is engaged in a delicate operation when her mobile device goes off, distracting her at a crucial moment. Neither the patient she is currently working with nor the one whose condition triggered the alert gets the attention he needs.

  • A nurse describes a change in a patient’s condition to a physician, who promises to order a new medication. The nurse then checks the medical record every few minutes in the hope of seeing when the order went through. (This is similar to a common computing problem called “polling”, where a software or hardware component wakes up regularly just to see whether data has come in for it to handle.)

Wasteful, nerve-racking situations such as these have caught the attention of Vocera over the past several years as it has rolled out communications devices and services for hospital staff, and have just been driven forward by its purchase of the software firm Extension Healthcare.

Vocera Communications’ and Extension Healthcare’s solutions blend to take pressures off clinicians in hospitals and improve their responses to patient needs. According to Brent Lang, President and CEO of Vocera Communications, the two companies partnered together on 40 customers before the acquisition. They take data from multiple sources–such as patient monitors and electronic health records–to make intelligent decisions about “when to send alarms, whom to send them to, and what information to include” so the responding nurse or doctor has the information needed to make a quick and effective intervention.

Hospitals are gradually adopting technological solutions that other parts of society got used to long ago. People are gradually moving away from setting their lights and thermostats by hand to Internet-of-Things systems that can adjust the lights and thermostats according to who is in the house. The combination of Vocera and Extension Healthcare should be able to do the same for patient care.

One simple example concerns the first scenario with which I started this article. Vocera can integrate with the hospital’s location monitoring (through devices worn by health personnel) that the system can consult to see whether the nurse is in the same room as the patient for whom the alert is generated. The system can then stop forwarding alarms about that patient to the nurse.

The nurse can also inform the system when she is busy, and alerts from other patients can be sent to a back-up nurse.

Extension Healthcare can deliver messages to a range of devices, but the Vocera badge and smartphone app work particularly well with it because they can deliver contextual information instead of just an alert. Hospitals can define protocols stating that when certain types of devices deliver certain types of alerts, they should be accompanied by particular types of data (such as relevant vital signs). Extension Healthcare can gather and deliver the data, which the Vocera badge or smartphone app can then display.

Lang hopes the integrated systems can help the professionals prioritize their interventions. Nurses are interrupt-driven, and it’s hard for them to keep the most important tasks in mind–a situation that leads to burn-out. The solutions Vocera is putting together may significantly change workflows and improve care.

Validic Survey Raises Hopes of Merging Big Data Into Clinical Trials

Posted on September 30, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Validic has been integrating medical device data with electronic health records, patient portals, remote patient monitoring platforms, wellness challenges, and other health databases for years. On Monday, they highlighted a particularly crucial and interesting segment of their clientele by releasing a short report based on a survey of clinical researchers. And this report, although it doesn’t go into depth about how pharmaceutical companies and other researchers are using devices, reveals great promise in their use. It also opens up discussions of whether researchers could achieve even more by sharing this data.

The survey broadly shows two trends toward the productive use of device data:

  • Devices can report changes in a subject’s condition more quickly and accurately than conventional subject reports (which involve marking observations down by hand or coming into the researcher’s office). Of course, this practice raises questions about the device’s own accuracy. Researchers will probably splurge for professional or “clinical-grade” devices that are more reliable than consumer health wearables.

  • Devices can keep the subject connected to the research for months or even years after the end of the clinical trial. This connection can turn up long-range side effects or other impacts from the treatment.

Together these advances address two of the most vexing problems of clinical trials: their cost (and length) and their tendency to miss subtle effects. The cost and length of trials form the backbone of the current publicity campaign by pharma companies to justify price hikes that have recently brought them public embarrassment and opprobrium. Regardless of the relationship between the cost of trials and the cost of the resulting drugs, everyone would benefit if trials could demonstrate results more quickly. Meanwhile, longitudinal research with massive amounts of data can reveal the kinds of problems that led to the Vioxx scandal–but also new off-label uses for established medications.

So I’m excited to hear that two-thirds of the respondents are using “digital health technologies” (which covers mobile apps, clinical-grade devices, and wearables) in their trials, and that nearly all respondents plan to do so over the next five years. Big data benefits are not the only ones they envision. Some of the benefits have more to do with communication and convenience–and these are certainly commendable as well. For instance, if a subject can transmit data from her home instead of having to come to the office for a test, the subject will be much more likely to participate and provide accurate data.

Another trend hinted at by the survey was a closer connection between researchers and patient communities. Validic announced the report in a press release that is quite informative in its own right.

So over the next few years we may enter the age that health IT reformers have envisioned for some time: a merger of big data and clinical trials in a way to reap the benefits of both. Now we must ask the researchers to multiply the value of the data by a whole new dimension by sharing it. This can be done in two ways: de-identifying results and uploading them to public or industry-maintained databases, or providing identifying information along with the data to organizations approved by the subject who is identified. Although researchers are legally permitted to share de-identified information without subjects’ consent (depending on the agreements they signed when they began the trials), I would urge patient consent for all releases.

Pharma companies are already under intense pressure for hiding the results of trials–but even the new regulations cover only results, not the data that led to those results. Organizations such as Sage Bionetworks, which I have covered many times, are working closely with pharmaceutical companies and researchers to promote both the software tools and the organizational agreements that foster data sharing. Such efforts allow people in different research facilities and even on different continents to work on different aspects of a target and quickly share results. Even better, someone launching a new project can compare her data to a project run five years before by another company. Researchers will have millions of data points to work with instead of hundreds.

One disappointment in the Validic survey was a minority of respondents saw a return on investment in their use of devices. With responsible data sharing, the next Validic survey may raise this response rate considerably.