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Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT? – Post #HIMSS16 Blab

Posted on March 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can watch the recording of our discussion in the video embedded below:

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business and Dell is sponsoring my trip to participate in the Dell Healthcare Think Tank. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT-blog

On Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with the Chief Medical Officers of both Samsung and Dell. As we recover from HIMSS 2016, we’ll be sharing the positive things we saw, heard and are doing in healthcare IT. Far too many people at HIMSS are focusing on the challenges and downside of healthcare IT. In this live video chat, we’re going to focus our discussion on the innovations and amazing technologies that are making healthcare better for everyone.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Plus, considering the size of HIMSS, the three of us likely only saw a small portion of the amazing innovations and technologies that were on display at HIMSS. Please join us on blab and share things you found at HIMSS that everyone should know about.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Also, you can see Dr. Nick and myself on the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event March 15th on Twitter using the #DoMoreHIT hashtag and the Livestream.

Interview with Dell’s New Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Nick van Terheyden

Posted on July 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Long time readers will know that we’ve regularly done videos with Dr. Nick (@DrNic1). He’s one of my favorite people to sit down with and talk healthcare IT. I first met Dr. Nick when he was CMO of MModal, but our relationship really flourished when he was CMO at Nuance and we shared a cab together to the airport at one of the healthcare IT conferences. Ever since then I’ve counted him a good friend and someone I enjoyed talking about anything healthcare IT related. The beauty with Dr. Nick is that you can go pretty deep with him on any science and technology topic.

With this in mind, I was excited to hear that Dr. Nick was just announced as Dell Healthcare & Life Sciences new Chief Medical Officer (CMO). Dell has a really large healthcare practice thanks to their acquisition of Perot Systems and a number of other acquisitions. Dell will be lucky to have Dr. Nick on their team.

As part of the announcement, I did a short interview with Dr. Nick (see below) to talk about what excited him about the opportunity to work at Dell and the place social media played in his hire. We’ll let Dr. Nick get a few months under his belt at Dell and then I’m sure I’ll have him on for another live G+ video hangout as well.
Dr Nick - CMO at Dell Healthcare
What excited you about Dell that inspired you to switch jobs and become CMO of Dell?
This was such an exciting opportunity with a dynamic company that has a big focus on healthcare that starts at the top with Michael Dell and traverses all the way through the organization that has assembled an outstanding collection of technology, resources but above all talented people that are dedicated to solving the issues we face in healthcare. When I looked at the breadth of what Dell could offer its customers, paired with amazing talent, it felt like a perfect match and one that offered me personally an incredible opportunity to have a positive impact on healthcare delivery systems around the world.

You’re only a few days on the job, but as you’ve gone through the process are their misconceptions about Dell that you now realize that aren’t true?
Yes. Of course the first thought everyone has is that Dell is a PC and hardware company and while this remains a major part of the organization, they have also received the ranking of number one provider of healthcare services in the world by Gartner! That position was achieved by assembling a first class talented team that have a wide range of skills and deep industry knowledge that is broader than healthcare and taps into the success and knowledgeable from many other vertical markets and industries. As one of the healthcare interoperability experts shared with me “I’ve been making systems talk to each other that aren’t supposed to for 20+ years”. His passion is achieving that goal to free data from the confines of individual systems and is typical of the skills and passion of the people working here. Interoperability is a major focus area for healthcare systems and rightly subject to significant scrutiny and pressure form regulatory bodies – working side by side people who come from other industries and bring new ideas and an urgency to solving problems is exhilarating for me. Tie that to a Unified Clinical Cloud archive that has over 9 Billion images today stored for customers designed to allow frictionless sharing of images and you can see this is an organization that can offer solutions to some of the most fundamental and pressing issues we face today

As Michael Dell puts it: Technology has always been about enabling human potential

And this is especially true in medicine where we have struggled to maintain the physician patient interaction that is the central tenet of good care. Clinicians want to focus on the patient and not the technology and that’s what the patients want too – they like the technology but not when it intrudes on their personal relationship with the doctor. This is one of the key drivers at Dell throughout their business and I’m excited to be bringing this to healthcare

You and Dell have both been doing a lot more work with healthcare internationally. What excites you about healthcare IT internationally?
Healthcare is personal for all of us and this is true worldwide. The problems and success we have here in the US are similar to those in other countries but colored by local customs, historical differences in building out healthcare in the country and varying levels of resources. We stand to learn so much from each other, learning from mistakes and benefiting from each other’s successes. I have had the privilege and fortune of working in many countries and am always amazed at the ingenuity and resourcefulness applied with pragmatic solutions that offer useful insights that can be applied elsewhere. Dell has huge presence in so many countries and markets that is combined with a brand name recognition that offers remarkable scope to share our knowledge and experiences around the world and for me personally the opportunity to learn from them and gather market insights from the widest stet of stake holders to guide our future direction.

It seems like Dell has hired some real social media rockstars starting with @MandiBPro and now you.  How do you think your social presence impacted your hire for good or bad?
Dell has been a stand out for me in Social Media – so much so I called them out in my presentation at HIMSS15: MasterChef in Healthcare – Integrating Social Media as a company demonstrating the value of social media engagement and showing others how to effectively capitalize on this untapped resource.

My social media activity has opened so many doors for me and was an important factor in landing the job at Dell and a positive aspect that attracted me to working at the company. Social media has allowed me to stay connected to people, learn a ton from others and build a community online that I wouldn’t otherwise be able to reach.

I could not be more excited to be joining an incredible pioneer, mentor and innovator in healthcare social media @MandiBPro. I’m excited to be here at Dell to see how they do it and learn from the experts and at the same time share my own thoughts and ideas around the value and contribution I think this medium can have to doctors, health systems and patients.

Are you excited to be working with someone as passionate as Mandi Bishop (@MandiBPro)?
Who wouldn’t be – Mandi is such an inspiration and so much fun to be around online and IRL. Now I get to hang out with her more often and with more learning opportunities. Her drive, insights and positive energy is infectious. In fact it was one of her many posts talking about how excited she was working at Dell that were instrumental in steering me towards the company and this role.

How would you describe your job duties as CMO at Dell?  Will we still see you around at all the major conferences?
You bet – I will be present at many of the major conferences sharing the Dell vision and strategy and helping get the message out that Dell is the partner to be working with helping you navigate the challenging waters in healthcare. I will be responsible for providing strategic insight to help Dell advance its support of healthcare organizations, medical professionals and patients through information-enabled healthcare and working with our clients gathering insights and direction and helping them navigate clinical issues and applying innovative solutions in an increasingly complex healthcare industry.

What would you describes as Dell’s top healthcare initiatives?
Dell has a wide range of services that span EHR Application Services, Strategy Consulting, Integration/Interoperability, Imaging, Revenue Cycle, Cloud Based secure storage and Business Intelligence and Analytics

But it extends to new and emerging areas that include Patient Engagement, social media and mobility and includes the FDA-approved personalized medicine clinical trial for pediatric cancer and work on a genomics cloud storage and analysis system.

The wow for me was that Dell already has a vast amount of products, solutions and data along with insights that they are already integrating across multiple platforms. I can’t wait to share more on some of the projects the Dell team are working on soon.

Assuming I’m invited back to another Dell Healthcare Think Tank, describe what it will be like having Mandi, you, and me on the same panel. #DoMoreHIT
It’s like plutonium – separately plutonium is interesting, produces some interesting and exciting results and has some fascinating properties….but when you put enough of it together you get something huge and impressive. Sharing the stage and building on each other’s strengths, insights, energy and enthusiasm will be an electrifying session.

Do Security and Privacy Concerns Drive Cloud Adoption?

Posted on April 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In one of my recent conversations with Dr. Andy Litt, Chief Medical Officer at Dell, he made a really interesting but possibly counter intuitive observation. While maybe not a direct quote from him, I took away this observation from Dr. Litt:

Security and privacy drives people to the cloud.

Talk about an ironic statement. I imagine if I were to talk to a dozen CIOs, they would be more concerned about the security and privacy implications of the cloud. I don’t imagine most would look at the cloud as the solution to some of their security and privacy problems.

However, Dr. Litt is right. Many times a cloud based EHR or other software is much more secure than a server hosted in a doctors office. The reality is that many healthcare organizations large or small just can’t invest the same money in securing their data as compared with a cloud provider.

It’s not for lack of desire to make sure the data is secure and private. However, if you’re a small doctor’s office, you can only apply so many resources to the problem. Even a small EHR vendor with a few hundred doctors can invest more money in the security and privacy of their data than a solo practice. Although, this is true for even very large practices and even many hospitals.

One reason why I think many will disagree with this notion is because there’s a difference between a cloud provider who can be more secure and private and one who actually executes on that possibility. It’s a fair question that everyone should ask. Although, this can be verified. You can audit your cloud provider and see that they’re indeed putting in security and privacy capabilities that are beyond what you’d be able to do on your own.

What do you think? Is hosting in the cloud a way to address security and privacy concerns?

My Optimism for Healthcare IT – #DoMoreHIT

Posted on March 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I posted about previously, I took part in the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event last week. This was my second year participating in the event, and I thoroughly enjoyed the stimulating discussion. In many ways it makes me wish that there was a health IT conference that was 2 days of stimulating discussion like we had, but with a larger mix of people. Would be a great experience.

At the end of the event, we were asked to summarize our thoughts about the event and where we were headed with healthcare IT. Here’s the video of my response:

Sometimes it’s easy to get bogged down in the meaningful use or ICD-10 mire (especially given all the ICD-10 delay talk). That’s natural since they are important issues. However, as I say in the video, I think we’re just getting started when it comes to the impact for good that IT will have on healthcare. Sure we have challenges, but the opportunities and potential is much greater than the challenges.

If you missed the live stream of the event, you can watch the recording here. Also, they had an artist capturing the event as we talked. Check them out below (click on the image to see the larger size):

This Week in Health Innovation and The Coming Mobile Health Startup Revolution

Posted on April 5, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After the great experience many of us had at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event, Gregg Masters asked if Shahid Shah (my partner in Influential Networks) and I would take part in an online interview he does called This Week in Health Innovation. This is one element of the Health Innovation Broadcast Consortium that Gregg and a few others have put together. We had a great 30 minute conversation about some of the major trends we saw happening in healthcare IT and then we even went into an overtime discussion for another 10 minutes. The time flew by in our discussion, but I think there were some really good nuggets shared in the interview. You can listen to the full interview in the embed below.

Listen to This Week in Health Innovation on Blog Talk Radio

I was also recently asked to do a guest blog post for the NYEC (New York eHealth Collaborative) blog. First, I have to say that I love that their blogging. Second, as many of you know, I’ve been participating in the Digital Health Conference in NYC that the NYEC puts on every year. It is a really great event.

With that background, I think that many of my readers will enjoy my guest post titled “The Coming Mobile Health Startup Revolution.” This is really coming, but I don’t think it’s going to come as most current mobile health people expect. A long series of incremental technology advancements have us prepped for an explosion of innovation in healthcare. I just hope that the healthcare structure doesn’t slow it down.

EHR Backlash, Patient Interaction, Smart Phone Use, and Dell Think Tank

Posted on March 17, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I realize this first tweet might be controversial for many. Any time you bring a bit of politics (Obamacare in this tweet), there’s a risk of bringing out the crazies. Hopefully we can avoid that, but I was intrigued by this tweet also because it had 17 Retweets by other people. That’s a crazy number of retweets for healthcare IT. I think this view is also part of the EHR backlash that we’ve written about before. Whether you agree with the tweet or not, there are a lot of doctors that feel similar to Dr. Kris Held and they’re starting to make their voice heard.


I love how many people have a focus on increasing patient interaction. An EMR can get you away from it if you’re not careful. The article in this link has some decent suggestions to consider. The most important advice is to be aware of it. Awareness does a lot to improve it.


The killer mobile app in healthcare has been Epocrates and largely is today. A well done EHR mobile app could see similar adoption. Although, there are 300 EHR vendors that aren’t focused on mobile (many of them at least), and so that’s why we don’t hear as much about it.


I’m going to be part of the Dell Healthcare Think Tank that’s mentioned in this tweet. They are doing a live online stream of the event and are even opening it up for questions from Twitter I believe. So, it should be a great opportunity to hear from a lot of smart people on the subject of healthcare IT and to participate online as well. Check it out Tuesday if you want to participate.

Health IT Twitter Roundup – Healthcare IT Company Edition

Posted on April 15, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you know, every Sunday I like to round up some of the various tweets I’ve seen out there talking about EMR, EHR, Healthcare IT and related subjects. Some are funny. Some are insightful. Some are interesting. Some are awkward. Some are way out there. In fact, isn’t that the beauty and the beast of Twitter? It includes all of those things from anyone who wants to participate. The nice thing is that you can always ignore someone if you don’t like what they’re saying.

With that said, this week’s edition of my healthcare IT Twitter roundup is focused on comments and announcements from a number of healthcare IT companies. Hopefully you’ll find them interesting.


This article is written by Dave Chase. I had the chance to see a demo of his Avado product last week. I’ll do a full writeup on it at some point in the future. Let’s just say I was impressed with Dave and his view of the healthcare IT world. I’m not sure I agree that meaningful use 2.0 is about talking to patients. Sure, it cracks the door open a little bit, but doctors can easily shut it again.


This won’t be a surprise to those who work in the industry. Although, this was from a survey of professionals in healthcare IT. Doesn’t seem like the best methodology for making this conclusion.


I first learned about these services from Dell at HIMSS. I’d been meaning to write about them and just never have been able to fit it into my publishing schedule. Until I do, I think it’s interesting to note that Dell’s offering these clinical help desk services to hospitals.


I’ve been a fan of Practice Fusion’s culture ever since the “scrappy” part was exhibited by their PR person trying to get me to write about them on my site a number of years back. It’s been quite interesting to see the company evolve. In the past I described them as the most “silicon valley” startup EMR company out there. I’ll be interested to see what “silicon valley” path the company takes from here. Startup companies are a hobby of mine and so it will be quite interesting to see Practice Fusion evolve as they continue to grow the company. Considering the amount of funding they’ve taken on, they’re going to have to grow the company really big in order to provide their VC’s the required return. When you grow that big that fast it’s a challenge to keep the culture.

Full Disclosure: Practice Fusion is an advertiser on this website.

Republican Candidates Healthcare Stances

Posted on September 9, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dr. James Coffin, VP of Healthcare and Life Sciences at Dell, has a post up on the Dell Healthcare Community site that looks at the stances of the various Republican candidates for the US Presidential nomination. It’s an interesting read if you haven’t been following the republican candidates very much.

What the article doesn’t address is these candidates stance on the HITECH Act. The key here is to realize that the HITECH act isn’t part of the Affordable Care Act which every GOP candidate is saying they will repeal if they become President. So, where does that really leave the HITECH Act should a republican president be elected?

The problem is that no one really knows. Those who argue that the HITECH Act is safe often lean on the ideas that EMR and EHR has always had bipartisan support. Many often mention that the push for adoption of EHR software was started by a republican president, George W. Bush. I actually agree that both sides of the aisle want to have widespread adoption of EHR. We could certainly argue the benefits or detriments of EHR adoption, but for a relatively uninformed senate, house and president when it comes to EHR, they’re going to easily grab on to the idea that technology can improve healthcare. We may agree or disagree with this point, but I think we’d be hard pressed to find a senator that thinks we shouldn’t have EHR technology in healthcare.

The problem with the above discussion has to do with the way that EHR is being paid for. Again, this isn’t about whether the idea of paying doctors to use EHR software is right or wrong, good or bad. This is more about the political stance of the republicans and how they want government to spend money. It seems very clear to me that Republicans are going to keep sitting on their no spending/cut spending soap box. If a republican becomes President, we’re likely to see widespread cuts. Could HITECH money be a casualty of those cuts? Absolutely. Will they be a casualty? Can anyone predict what Washington will really do?

Should doctors and practices then be afraid of going after the EHR stimulus money? Well, I’ve been advising doctors and practices for the last couple years to not implement an EHR in order to get the government hand out. Those that are doing EHR for “free” government money are going to be disappointed. Not only because the money could be cut, but because sooner or later that money will be gone. So, if you’ve followed my advice, then the loss of the EHR stimulus money will be unfortunate but not too terrible.

On the other hand, those people who only did EHR because the government was waving the carrot and the stick are likely going to be quite disappointed. Particularly if the practice focused on the governments EHR requirements instead of their own individual practice needs when it comes to an EHR. Sadly, I believe there are many clinics in this boat.

I’m sure there are other Washington DC insider workings that are in play as well. Hopefully many of you will share some of what you know in the comments.

Personally, I’m still fairly confident that the EHR stimulus money will play itself out. I’ll be a little surprised if indeed it does get cut. I think republicans will have larger fish to fry. However, there’s certainly that possibility, so doctors should take this into account when they’re selecting and implementing an EHR.