Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Columbia-Affiliated Physician Group Plans Rollout Of Mobile Engagement Platform

Posted on December 15, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A massive multispecialty medical practice associated with Columbia University has decided to implement a mobile patient engagement platform, as part of a larger strategy aimed at boosting patient satisfaction and ease of access to care.

The vendor behind the technology, HealthGrid, describes its platform as offering the physicians the ability to “provide actionable care coordination, access to critical health information and to enable [patient] self-care management.” HealthGrid also says that its platform will help the group comply with the requirements of Meaningful Use and MIPS.

The group, ColumbiaDoctors, includes more than 1,700 physicians, surgeons, dentists and nurses, and offers more than 230 specialty and subspecialty areas of care. All of the group’s clinicians are affiliated with New York-Presbyterian hospital and serve as faculty at Columbia University Medical Center.

The group is investing heavily in making its services more accessible and patient-friendly. In April, for example, ColumbiaDoctors agreed to roll out the DocASAP platform, which is designed to offer patients advanced online scheduling capabilities, including features allowing patients to find and book patients via mobile and desktop channels, tools helping patients find the best provider for their needs and analytics tools for business process improvement.

HealthGrid, for its part, describes itself as a CRM platform whose goal is to “meet patients where they are.” The vendor has developed a rules engine, based on clinical protocols, that connects with patients at key points in the care process. This includes reaching out to patients regarding needed appointments, education, medications and screening, both before and after they get care. The system also allows patients to pay their co-pays via mobile channels.

Its other features include automated mobile check-in – with demographic information auto-populated from the EMR – which patients can update from their mobile phones. The platform allows patients to read, update and sign off on forms such as HIPAA documentation and health information using any device.

While I’d never heard of HealthGrid before, it sounds like it has all the right ideas in place for consumer engagement. Clearly it impressed ColumbiaDoctors, which must be spending a fair amount on its latest addition. I’m sure the group’s leaders feel that if it increases patient alignment with treatment goals and improves the condition of the population it serves, they’ll come out ahead.

But the truth is, I don’t think anyone knows yet whether health organizations can meet big population health goals by interacting more with patients or spending more time in dusty back rooms fussing over big data analytics. To be sure, if you have enough money to spend they can both reach out directly to patients and invest heavily in next-generation big data infrastructure. However, my instinct is that very few institutions can focus on both simultaneously.

Without a doubt, sophisticated health IT leaders know that it pays to take smart chances, and ColumbiaDoctors is probably wise to pick its spot rather than play catch-up. Still, it’s a big risk as well. I’ll be most eager to see whether tools like HealthGrid actually impact patients enough to be worth the expense.

NYC Hospital Puts 6800 Health Records Online

Posted on September 29, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A New York City hospital has apologized for a security lapse that allowed personal information belonging to as many as 6,800 former patients to be published on the Internet.

New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center says the information included names, clinical data and a few social security numbers.

The hospital said in a statement that the data had been inadvertently placed on a server, which was accessible online. The information has now been taken down. –Source

This is a pretty sad indiscretion although it is lacking some important details. I hate that it only says personal information for 6800 former patients. Ok, putting ANY health information on an insecure web server is just dumb, but not all health information is created equal. Plus, wouldn’t it be nice to know what happened to cause this issue so that others could learn from their mistakes?

Plus, was the health information placed on the web server in an accessible location or was it just on the web server? That would be very different things.

Still something’s wrong if they’re putting patient information on an unsecured server. Makes me wonder what the rest of the story really is though.