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Disruptive Innovation vs Incremental Improvement – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on April 18, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 4/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung) on the topic of “Disruptive Innovation vs Incremental Improvement”.

The term “disruptive innovation” has been driven into our minds by technology and business media. It is the goal of many #HealthIT startups as well as innovation teams at healthcare organizations. Everyone is hoping that their technology or service will be labeled as the next disruptive innovation. I dare say that we are in danger of becoming so obsessed with being disruptive that we are ignoring the here-and-now.

When Clayton Christensen coined the term “disruptive innovation” back in the 90s, he used a very strict definition:

A process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves up market, eventually displacing established competitors.

In a more recent 2015 HBR article Christensen warns about labeling every improvement as disruptive:

Many researchers, writers, and consultants use “disruptive innovation” to describe any situation in which an industry is shaken up and previously successful incumbents stumble. But that’s much too broad a usage.

If we get sloppy with our labels or fail to integrate insights from subsequent research and experience into the original theory, then managers may end up using the wrong tools for their context, reducing their chances of success. Over time, the theory’s usefulness will be undermined.

Using Christensen’s definition, a disruptive innovation in healthcare would be something that starts off in the underserved part of the market (ex: people who don’t seek care or can’t afford it) and would be seen by incumbents (healthcare providers) as an inferior solution. Slowly that new product/service would go up-market until it replaces the incumbents. Using this lens, many of today’s supposed disruptive #HealthIT innovations fall short. There aren’t many that are aimed at the underserved healthcare markets.

When you use the more common definition, a disruptive innovation is anything that shakes up an incumbent’s market. In a perverse way, this common understanding leads to fear and self-preserving actions. By labeling something as disruptive, you immediately put incumbents on notice – and in response they raise barriers to protect themselves. In a risk-adverse environment like healthcare, convincing someone to adopt a new technology or process is difficult enough but when you label a technology as disruptive, additional barriers get raised: How will it affect privacy? How will clinicians react to it? Will it impact billing? Very few healthcare organizations want to be first to adopt an unproven technology/process.

So the question is, do we even need to proactively seek disruptive innovation in healthcare? Can we not just focus on rapid incremental improvements instead? Let’s fix EHRs so that they aren’t administrative burdens on physicians. Let’s redesign patient portals to be easier to use and let’s fill them with the content patients actually want. Let’s figure out ways to make healthcare payments more transparent. Are we so desperate for a label that we’ve lost sight of making an everyday difference?

Join me on Friday April 21st at 12:00pm ET as we discuss the following questions on #HITsm:

The Questions
T1: Is healthcare too biased against adopting disruptive innovations? Can this bias ever be overcome? #HITsm

T2: Are #HealthIT companies too focused on finding/funding TOMORROW’s disruptive innovation (aka moonshot) vs improvements TODAY? #HITsm

T3: Is the problem just one of labeling? Does it matter in #HealthIT that something is disruptive vs incremental? #HITsm

T4: What do you believe will be the next disruptive innovation in healthcare?  #HITsm

T5: What can be done in healthcare to create an environment where innovation AND improvements are welcomed & encouraged? #HITsm

Bonus: If you had unlimited resources and budget, how would you use them to disrupt healthcare? #HITsm

Be sure to also join tonight’s #hcldr chat where Colin is starting the conversation around disruptive innovation vs incremental improvement.

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
4/28 – Where Did You Start and How Did You Get Here? The Story of Your Healthcare Career Path
Hosted by Lizzie Barrett (@eliztbarrett)

5/5 – Precision Health 101: Understanding the Keys to Value
Hosted by Bob Rogers (@ScientistBob) from @IntelHealth

5/12 – TBD
TBD

5/19 – Patient Education Using Healthcare Social Media
Hosted by Anne Zieger (@annezieger)

5/26 – TBD
Hosted by Chad Johnson (@OchoTex)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you have ideas for how to make #HITsm better.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

#HITsm and #hcldr Meetup at #HIMSS17 (And Online)

Posted on February 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was excited to join forces with my friend Colin Hung and do a combined meetup with the #HITsm and #hcldr communities at the HIMSS 2017 conference. There’s so much overlap between the two communities, we didn’t see any reason to do something separately.

After a lot of discussions, we decided to go back to our roots and return to the old meetup style. So, we’re meeting in the lobby outside of Hall D on Tuesday, 2/21 at 10 AM ET (7 AM PT). We’ve also enlisted the help of some great people to facilitate those who show up for the meetup (Thanks @mandibpro, @shahidnshah, @sarahbennight).

There’s not really a formal agenda per se. However, we do have a fun social activity for people to participate in. Plus, even if you’re not at the event, you can participate remotely. Here’s the format if you plan to participate remotely.

At 10 AM ET (7 AM PT), you can start by introducing yourself, what you do, and a fun fact or something interesting about you.

Shortly after that, take out a piece of paper or a whiteboard in your office and answer the question “How can we #ImproveHealthcare?”. Once you’ve answered the question on paper or the whiteboard, take a picture of you with the answer and tweet it out with the question “How can we #ImproveHealthcare?” and the hashtags: #hcldr #HITsm and #HIMSS17.

The great news is that @JoeBabaian will be taking care of managing those that are participating remotely. Plus, those of us that are in attendance live will be doing the same. So, we will be able to see the remote messages and those people following along remotely will be able to see our messages from HIMSS.

That’s all. Simple and sweet. We hope you’ll join us. Plus, if are following along at home, you can check out all of the tweets people are sharing here.

The Need for an Improved Patient Focus and Patient Experience in Healthcare

Posted on July 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had a chance to talk with Colin Hung from Stericycle, a real thought leader in the world of healthcare IT and patient engagement. You can watch our discussion below where we talk about the lack of patients at healthcare IT conferences and a healthcare IT vendor perspective around interaction with patients. Plus, we dive into the concept of patient experience and patient’s desire to communicate and interact with their physician. We also talk about self-scheduling appointments in healthcare and involving patients in product design.

Thanks to Colin for sharing a bit about the benefits of involving more patients in healthcare IT. I’m sure we could have talked for a few more hours about this topic.

The Burnt Out Healthcare IT Industry – Time for a Reset

Posted on March 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Colin Hung recently posted that HIMSS 2016 didn’t really have a theme and that this was a good thing. I think that’s a fair assessment. There wasn’t any one topic or initiative that was grabbing everyone’s attention. However, I would argue that there was a theme coming out of HIMSS 2016:

The Healthcare IT industry is tired and burnt out.

You know the feeling when you’re burnt out. You can’t think about any more topics. You can’t add anything new to your plate. You just need some time to re-energize yourself before you start taking on new initiatives. You need some time to reset.

While at HIMSS I heard and read a few people mention that the healthcare IT world feels a bit like it did after the craziness of Y2K. They described the feeling at HIMSS after Y2K similar to what it was like at HIMSS 2016.

I’ll admit that I was off in Italy without technology for Y2K, so I can’t compare it first hand, but the comparison makes a lot of sense. I did see how companies and organizations were trying to prepare for Y2K. After putting so much focus and worry on a project for an extended period, you need some down time to reset your priorities.

I see the same happening today. However, it isn’t just one thing that’s tied up healthcare executives. Meaningful use has been all consuming for many organizations. ICD-10 took up a whole lot of focus and training to ensure that everything went smoothly with that transition. HIPAA Omnibus and this wave of breaches along with the HIPAA Security Risk assessment requirements has caused organizations to focus on security. All of that has consumed healthcare executives focus the past couple years. It’s definitely time for a well deserved reset.

However, it’s not just the leaders that need a reset. The entire organization needs a reset and some space to relax after executing so many major projects at once (often in a very compressed time frame).

The problem is that there won’t be much time to sit back and relax. Most EHR implementations still need a lot of work. Doctors are getting more and more frustrated with their EHR and we’re going to need to do something about it before it adds to the already burnt out doctors. However, looking back I think we’ll see HIMSS 2016 as the year of the Healthcare IT reset. I don’t think that’s a bad thing. In fact, I think it’s necessary.

Patient Engagement Panel – Inaugural Online Medical Conference

Posted on September 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

John Bennett, MD reached out to me recently about a unique opportunity to be part of the 1st International Online BioMedical Conference. The conference was unique because it was being organized completely online using Google Hangouts as the platform for speakers. Having done a number of Google Hangouts on Healthcare IT myself, I thought it would be a unique opportunity to test out the online conference waters.

As part of the conference, I brought together a panel of social media and healthcare IT rockstars to talk about Patient Engagement (in all its facets) and the challenges of patient engagement. Plus, I wanted to be sure we talked about how it could help and hinder care. On the panel were Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Dr. Nick Van Terheyden (@DrNic1), Dr. Charles Webster(@wareflo), and myself (@ehrandhit). With such a wide set of experiences, it made for a really great discussion. You can watch it below:

Thanks to each of my fellow panelists for participating with me and to Manuel and Dr. Bennett who organized the conference.

Dropout Docs – The Answer for #HealthIT Startups?

Posted on July 23, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

We’d like to welcome a new guest blogger to our ranks. If you’re on social media, you probably know Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr. Colin is also head of Marketing for @PatientPrompt, a product offered by Stericycle Communication Solutions. We look forward to many posts from Colin in the future.

Recently both Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1) and Mandi Bishop (@MandiBPro) shared a link to an interesting article via Facebook. “Dropout Docs: Bay Area Doctors Quit Medicine to Work for Digital Health Startups”.
Dropout Doctors - Bay Area Doctors Leave Medicine for Healthcare Startups
The article highlights a new phenomenon happening In the Bay area – would-be doctors are dropping out of prestigious medical schools to pursue careers in digital health. Even those that complete their schooling are opting to join digital health start-ups/incubators (like Rock Health located in San Francisco, very close to USCF Medical Center) rather than apply for residency.

Being a doctor or a surgeon was once the pinnacle of achievement in American society, but with changes to reimbursements and general healthcare frustration, many are not seeing the practice of medicine as the rosy utopia it used to be (or was it ever?). Now even physicians are succumbing to the siren call of #HealthIT where there is a chance to “do good” and make a difference on a large scale.

I believe this trend could be a good thing for #HealthIT. Having more peers who are enthusiastic and passionate about improving healthcare can lead to more positive innovations. Consider the following quote from a doctor who joined a health care company instead of practicing medicine (from the KQED article):

“I realized that the system isn’t designed for doctors to make the real change you would like to for the patient.”

Having more people who want to put the patient at the center of healthcare makes my #HealthIT heart race. You can’t teach people to have this inner fire. It is something that is intrinsic to the individual…and we need more peers in #HealthIT with this flame.

There is just one line from the article that don’t agree with:

“…dropout doctors are well-positioned for a career in digital health as they have an insider’s view of the industry – and ideas about how to fix it.”

I think it is a bit of a stretch to say that people who went through med-school have a true “insider’s view”. Having not worked in a practice or in a healthcare setting, they would not be familiar with the political, financial or workflow aspects of care on the front lines. I hope these doc-dropouts are humble enough to remain open-minded as they listen to real-life customers provide feedback on the technologies and solutions they are involved with. In fact, dropout docs would be well served by remembering one particular part of their medical training – truly listening to the patient – which in this case may be the entirety of healthcare.