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They Do Listen: Stage 2 Proposal Includes Some Changes to Stage 1 – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on April 9, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

Included in the Proposed Rule for Meaningful Use Stage 2 are several modifications to the requirements for Meaningful Use Stage 1—likely in response to a barrage of comments from providers. 

The MU Stage 1 measure requiring a test of the ability to exchange clinical data would be removed effective 2013. Apparently, the concept of a test created a great deal of confusion. This change, however, should not be interpreted as reduced interest in interoperability. In fact, Stage 2 is all about the sharing of data. The measure would be replaced in Stage 2 by numerous other measures that require the sharing of clinical information—both between providers and with patients. 

The “all 3 vital signs dilemma”, (described in a previous Meaningful Use Monday post), would be resolved by a change to the vital signs measure. Separating height and weight from blood pressure, the revised measure would allow a provider to meet the threshold for recording height and weight, while claiming an exclusion for blood pressure, (or vice-versa). This is good news for specialists like orthopaedists who may routinely document height and weight but who rarely document blood pressure unless it is relevant to a specific patient’s problem. This change would be available as an option in 2013, and formalized in 2014. (The vital signs measure would also increase the minimum age requiring blood pressure documentation from 2-year olds to 3-year olds.) 

Many providers reported a problem in meeting the CPOE measure because of the way the calculation was defined—particularly those providers whose treatment does not frequently include prescribing medication. Now, providers would be able to define the denominator as the number of medications ordered, rather than the “number of unique patients with at least one medication in the patient’s medication list”, (since that list often includes medications downloaded from Surescripts and prescribed by other providers.) There is already a CMS FAQ (#10369) that allows providers to use this alternate definition even in 2012.

The government is listening, so make your voice heard. Use your experience in Meaningful Use Stage 1 to influence Meaningful Use Stage 2. Submit your comments on the Proposed Rule for Stage 2.

Real Participation in RHIO and HIE

Posted on November 28, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everyone seems to love talking about RHIO, HIE and all of the other various initiatives happening around sharing patient health information amongst doctors. This weekend, I want to open it up to you the readers to get an idea of what type of participation you’ve had in an RHIO, HIE or other clinical data exchange.

Are you participating in one now? Do you like it? Do you hate it? In fact, what do you like and what do you hate? Do you use an EMR to interface with the exchange? What’s the interface like? How much work is it to manage the interface?

I’d also be interested in hearing about people who are working through the process now. Where are you at in the process? What’s holding you up from making this happen?

Let’s help educate each other on what’s happening with something that I think we can all universally agree is important and INCREDIBLY challenging.