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Optimization Dominates CHIME17 Discussions

Posted on November 8, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

“Our EHR Implementation is done”

“We completed our EHR roll-out last year”

“The last EHR module has gone live”

With these words, CIO presenters at the recent CHIME Fall CIO Forum (CHIME17) ushered in a new era in Healthcare IT. Instead of EHR implementations dominating the discussion, optimization was the hot topic of discussion at the event.

“It’s clear to us that CIOs are dedicating more time and energy towards optimizing their systems rather than just implementing them”, says Ed Rucinski, Senior Vice President Worldwide Healthcare Sales at Nuance and CHIME17 attendee. “Our clients, for example, are looking for ways to simplify the documentation physicians have to do in their EHRs so that they can focus their attention back on helping patients.”

Finding ways to better utilize the EHR infrastructure was the subject of many CHIME17 sessions. In one, Sallie Arnett, Vice President Information Systems and Chief Information Officer at Licking Memorial Health Systems, presented how her organization is leveraging EHR and patient monitoring data to detect the early signs of sepsis. Over 62 lives were saved through the work of Arnett and the staff at Licking Memorial.

These results would not have been possible without the investments made in EHR implementations and other digitization efforts.

Several sessions at CHIME17 were centered on the changing role of CMIOs. For the past several years CMIOs have been synonymous with EHR implementations. Now with EHRs up and running, CHIME presenters spoke about how CMIOs were morphing into CHIOs – Chief Health Information Officers – charged with extracting clinical value from the data within the hospital’s systems. This shift in focus is further evidence that healthcare is beginning to move beyond implementation and that we are entering a time of EHR optimization.

The new focus on optimization is a welcome development. It signifies that we are finally near the end of the road-building phase of the inudstry’s EHR journey and we are getting to the phase where we start building things to make the roads useful (like gas stations, diners and cars).

Personally I am looking forward to what the next few years will bring. It will be exciting to see how decision support tools, predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, personalized medicine applications and population health systems will leverage the data that is accumulating in EHRs. The next few years will be truly interesting for CIOs.

The State of the Healthcare CIO

Posted on November 2, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I’ve talked to hundreds of healthcare CIOs this week at the CHIME Fall Forum, a number of themes keep coming up. No doubt there’s always a lot of excitement in the air at a conference like this. In many ways, it’s great that there’s a good, optimistic energy at a conference. A conference wouldn’t be very good without that energy, but under the covers, there’s often more to the story. Here are some broad insights into the state of the healthcare CIO that goes beyond the natural excitement and energy of a conference.

No More Systems – Most of the CIOs who I’ve talked to feel like they have all the IT systems they need. In fact, most are trying to find ways to get rid of IT systems. They’re not looking to add any more IT systems to their mix. There’s a strong desire to simplify their current setup and to maximize the benefits their current IT systems. They don’t want to add new ones.

Do Want Solutions – While healthcare CIOs don’t want to add new systems, they do want to find solutions that will be complementary to their existing systems. There is a massive desire to optimize what they’re doing and show value from their current IT systems. Solutions that are proven and work on top of their existing infrastructure are welcomed by these CIOs.

Security Is Still a Concern – I have a feeling that this topic may never die. Security is still a huge concern for CIOs and something that will continue to be important for a long time to come. Most now have some kind of security strategy in place, but I haven’t met anyone that’s totally comfortable with their security strategy. It seems that this is what keeps CIOs up at night more than any other issue.

Analytics Is a Challenge – Most of the healthcare CIOs know that analytics is going to be an important part of their future. They can see the potential value that analytics can provide, but most don’t know where to find these analytics. Most organizations don’t have a clear analytics strategy or direction. We’re still just seeing anecdotal results for very specific solutions. There’s no clear direction that every healthcare CIO is following for analytics.

CIOs are Stressed – It was very appropriate that yesterday’s keynote presentation was on turning stress into a positive. Most of the healthcare CIOs I met are quite stressed. They have a lot on their plates and most don’t know how they’re going to manage it all. Plus, they’re still overwhelmed by all the changing regulations and reimbursement changes. The fact that there doesn’t seem to be any end in sight adds to that stress.

Turnover is Still High – It seems that there’s still a lot of turnover that’s happening with CIOs. This is a challenge when it comes to continuity at organizations. However, those CIOs that have been able to stay at an organization for a longer period of time are starting to see new opportunities to be more strategic. They’ve fought all the initial fires and cleaned up the processes and now they can start working on more strategic initiatives.

Holding On vs Embracing Change – I see two different views evolving by CIOs. Many are holding on tightly to the old Chief Infrastructure Officer versus embracing the new Chief Innovation Officer mindset. CHIME is certainly espousing the view of the CIO becoming a Chief Innovation Officer and it’s the view that I think is best as well. However, there are plenty of CIOs that just want to provide the technology to their organization. It will be interesting to see what happens to both of these approaches to the CIO position.

Those are some high-level thoughts from talking with CIOs at the CHIME Fall Forum. What are you seeing? Are you seeing or hearing anything different from what I described above? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

Making Stress Your Friend, Not Your Enemy – #CHIME17 Keynote Twitter Roundup

Posted on November 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I’m at the CHIME 2017 Fall Forum in San Antonio. It’s a great event that is no doubt the largest gathering of healthcare CIOs in one place. Today they kicked off the event with a great keynote speech from Kelly McGonigal that reframed stress in a really unique way. Here are some of the tweets that captured the essence of Kelly’s message.

You can see there are some powerful reframes when it comes to stress. It’s amazing the impact that just thinking of stress as a positive thing in your life can have on the outcomes. That’s a lesson we can all use since we all experience stress.

Along with the keynote, CHIME also did a great tribute to Neal Patterson, CEO of Cerner who passed away recently. It was very nice to take a moment to talk about Neal and his impact on the healthcare IT industry.


DirectTrust, CHIME Deal Not All It’s Cracked Up To Be

Posted on September 7, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Recently, CHIME and DirectTrust announced a deal that sounded pretty huge on the surface. In a joint press release announcing the agreement, the two organizations said they had agreed to work together “to promote the universal deployment of the Direct Trust framework and health information exchange network as the common electronic interface for health information exchange across the U.S.”

Their plans include making the Direct exchange network available anywhere they can, including hospitals, medical practices, pharmacies, labs, long-term care facilities, payers, insurers and health departments, and to top it off, on applications. If things go the way they planned, you’ll hardly be able to kick a health IT rock without finding Direct under it.

As I noted earlier this year, DirectTrust is on something of a roll. In May, it noted that the number of health information service providers who engaged in Direct exchanges grew to almost 95,000 during the first quarter of this year. That’s a 63% increase versus the same period in 2016. The group also reported that the number of trusted Direct addresses which could share PHI grew 21%, to 1.4 million, and that there were 35.6 million Direct exchange transactions during the quarter, up 76% over the same period last year.

Sounds good. But let’s not judge this in a vacuum. For example, on the same day DirectTrust released its first quarter results, the Sequoia Project kicked out a press release touting its performance. In the release, Sequoia noted that its Carequality initiative was under full steam, with more than 19,000 clinics, 800 hospitals and 250,000 providers using the Carequality Interoperability Framework to share health data.

In considering the impact of Carequality, let’s not forget that late last year it connected with rival interoperability group CommonWell Health Alliance. I don’t know if you can say that interoperability effort can corner a market– the organizations using the rival health data sharing networks probably overlap substantially—but it’s certainly an interesting development. While the two organizations were both allied with a leading EMR vendor (CommonWell with Cerner and Carequality with Epic), the agreement has effectively brought the muscle of the two EMR giants together.

I guess it’s fair to say that the Carequality alliance and DirectTrust may own interoperabililty for now, rivaled only by the stronger regional HIEs.  That’s pretty impressive, I admit. Also, it’s interesting to see an accepted health IT organization like CHIME throw its weight behind Direct. I wouldn’t have expected CHIME to dive in here.

That being said, when you get down to it, none of the groups’ capacity for sharing health data is as great as it sounds. For example, if Epic’s Care Everywhere exchange only transmits C-CDA records, you have to ask yourself if Carequality is working at a higher level. If not, we’re in “meh” territory.

Bottom line, it seems clear that these organizations are winning the battle for interoperability mindshare. Both seem to have made a fair amount of progress. But between you and me in the lamppost, let’s not get excited just yet.

HIPAA and Facebook Are Diametrically Opposed

Posted on June 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I tweeted this from the CHIME Fall Forum last year, but the idea is still on my mind. First, are HIPAA and Facebook diametrically opposed? Second, if they are or they aren’t, what does that mean for healthcare?

I’m not sure the intent of the person who said that Facebook and HIPAA were diametrically opposed, but I think it’s a reasonable observation. Facebook cares about getting and sharing as much information about you as possible. HIPAA cares about trying to protect your information.

While I think this is fundamentally how these companies think, the reality of what they do is much closer than people would think at first glance. While Facebook certainly wants to collect all of your personal data, it also has become quite sophisticated in its efforts to allow you to control how your data is shared. This wasn’t something that came naturally to them, but was forced upon them by years of crazy indiscretions which forced their hand.

HIPAA has come from the other end. While HIPAA is the portability act and not the privacy act (common mistake), that’s not how it was viewed when it was implemented. Everyone in healthcare saw HIPAA as a way to inhibit data sharing as opposed to a way to provide a framework for secure data sharing. In many cases, that’s still how people use HIPAA today. However, we’re starting to see that change as healthcare organizations have realized that their organizations need to share data. While not as progressive as Facebook in their data sharing controls, healthcare has become much more specific about how, when, what, and where they share patient data.

While we can find plenty of privacy and security issues with Facebook and HIPAA, I’d argue that both of them have become much more sophisticated in their approach to privacy and security. I believe this trend will only continue to get better.

What does all of this mean for healthcare?

Healthcare can learn a lot from Facebook when it comes to creating sophisticated privacy options that put the patient in control of their health data and allow the patient to control if and when that data is shared. However, we shouldn’t be surprised when we implement these controls and patients start sharing in ways that might feel risky to us. We may want to consider even more training on these sophisticated sharing options than what Facebook did for their users.

No doubt there’s a power in health data and much of that power is unleashed when it’s shared with the right people. The best thing we can do to unleash this power isn’t to create a free for all data sharing approach, but instead to take a more sophisticated data sharing approach that puts the patient at the center of the decision making process.

The Teeter Totter of Security and Usability – Tony Scott, US CIO at #CHIME16

Posted on November 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently at the CHIME Fall Forum and had the privilege of hearing a keynote presentation by Tony Scott, US Federal CIO, that was made possible by Infinite Computer Solutions. Tony Scott has a fascinating background at VM Ware, Microsoft, Disney and GM which gives him a pretty unique perspective on technology and his topic of cybersecurity.

During Tony’s keynote, he made a great plea for all of us working in healthcare IT when he said:

Cybersecurity is important and there’s something that each one of us can do about it!

When it comes to Cybersecurity I think that many people throw up their arms and think that there’s not much they can do. However, if we all do our small part in improving cybersecurity, then the aggregate result would be powerful. That’s something each of us in healthcare should take seriously as we think of how cybersecurity issues could literally impact the care patients receive going forward.

Along these same lines, Tony Scott also suggested that members of CHIME (largely healthcare CIOs) should work to share with peers. Cybersecurity is such a challenging problem, we have to share and learn from each other. I saw this happening first hand in a few of the cybersecurity sessions I attended at the conference. Healthcare CIOs were happily sharing security best practices with each other. The reality is that everyone in healthcare suffers when healthcare organizations suffer a breach and erode the confidence of patients. So, we all benefit by sharing our experience and knowledge about cybersecurity with each other.

Tony Scott also framed the cybersecurity challenge when he said, “Every time we have a breach, we could think of it as a quality issue.” No doubt this was calling back to his days at GM when quality issues were a major challenge, but what a great way to frame a breach. When there’s a breach, there’s something wrong with the quality of the product we provide our healthcare organizations and ultimately patients. With that mindset, we can go about making sure that the health IT product we provide is of the highest quality.

While I enjoyed each of these insights from Tony Scott’s keynote, I had the unique opportunity to be able to head backstage to the green room to talk privately with Tony Scott and the team from Infinite Computer Solutions that was hosting him as keynote. We had a brief but interesting discussion about his keynote and the challenges of cybersecurity in healthcare.

During our discussion, Tony Scott offered an important insight about the balance of cybersecurity and usability when he compared it to a teeter totter. Far too many organizations treat cybersecurity and usability like a teeter totter. If you make something more secure, then that makes things less usable. If you make things more usable, then they’re going to be less secure. Or at least that’s how many people look at cybersecurity.

In my discussion with Tony, he argued that we need to look at ways to raise the teeter totter up so that there’s not this give and take between security and usability. We should look for ways to make things extremely usable, but also secure. I’d suggest that this is the challenge we must face head on in healthcare over the next decade. Let’s not just settle ourselves with the teeter totter effect of security and usability, but let’s strive to raise the teeter totter up so we preserve both.

The Challenge of Patient Identification and Patient Matching

Posted on March 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A little bit before HIMSS, Healthcare Scene had the chance to sit down with a panel of experts on patient identification and patient matching, but I wasn’t able to post that interview until now. This is such an important topic, so I was happy to learn from some real experts in the space.

In this interview we talk over the challenges associated with matching patients in healthcare and the damage that’s done when you don’t match the right patient. We also talk about the solutions to the patient identification and matching problem including the impact a national patient identifier would have on the problem. Finally, we talk over CHIME’s $1 million National Patient ID challenge.

Here’s a look at those who participated in the discussion:

If you’re interested in the challenge of patient identification and patient matching in healthcare, then you’ll enjoy this discussion:

Also, after the more formal discussion we take some questions from the live audience in what we call the “after party.” Plus we even dusciss Beth Just’s new alter ego. Finally, we dive in deeper on the topic of patient identification and matching:

Five Commonly Overlooked ICD-10 IT Transition Strategies

Posted on December 1, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Daniel M. Flanagan, Executive Consultant, Beacon Partners.
Daniel M. Flanagan, Executive Consultant, Beacon Partners
While some organizations have relaxed their approach to ICD-10 readiness given the October 1, 2015 extension, recent polls show that the majority of healthcare organizations remain woefully unprepared.  About 60% of healthcare systems and 96% of physician practices have not begun end-to-end testing according to recent surveys conducted by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and Navicure, a leading claims clearinghouse. A lack of testing puts the ICD-10 transition at the greatest risk of failure.

ICD-10 readiness planning should remain a top priority because conducting a comprehensive gap analysis and the resulting remediation work will correct system vulnerabilities that will improve revenue cycle performance today.  However, systems performance improvement is time and resource-intensive and cannot be achieved at the last minute.

Below are five often overlooked transition planning steps:

  1. Update and complete your IT system inventory. We have helped several healthcare organizations prepare for ICD-10 and a common vulnerability is the absence of a complete and accurate IT inventory. Nearly one-third of organizations do not keep an inventory, and, of those that do, most are inaccurate. Many contain systems that are no longer in use and fail to reflect new or recently upgraded applications. Only a few organizations have had a complete IT inventory that accurately reflects all systems requiring end-to-end testing.  We often discover code-sensitive “orphan” applications and systems implemented by end-users without the IT department’s review and approval, which must be added to the inventory. An accurate IT inventory is critical to determine the extent of testing required, and to budget the time and expense needed to complete it.
  1. Review the number and functionality of all interfaces. Revenue cycle interfaces often contain the most critical code processing gaps and represent an organization’s greatest transition risk. For example, workflow analysis sometimes reveals unreliable processing of ICD-9 codes by billing system or other interfaces.  Extensive remediation is needed after the readiness assessment is completed in such cases.  Highly unreliable manual systems are also often used to process code, which impacts work that should be handled electronically. When conducting a workflow analysis, we sometimes find that experienced revenue cycle system end-users disagree about the design and functionality of long-standing systems and interfaces. Friction can arise between end-users and IT application specialists when interfaces do not work or appear not to work properly. Such issues can often be resolved quickly and objectively when a workflow analysis is performed early in the readiness planning process.
  1. Enlist the support of system end-users early to identify performance gaps and devise solutions. Readiness requires that any system that stores, processes, or uses diagnosis codes be identified and tested. However, it is easy to overlook some important performance gaps. In the majority of cases, end-users can readily identify performance gaps and recommend potential, practical solutions.  End-users can also be valuable in identifying potential solutions.  Involving end-users as early as possible in transition planning can avert wasted time.  For instance CDI, case management, as well as QA operating and reporting systems are heavily code-driven, but can be tough to “see,” especially if work is performed on paper. Enlisting end-users to identify code-impacted systems is a great way to ensure nothing is missed.
  1. Set a date to begin testing and verify that payers, clearinghouses, IT vendors, and others tied to your revenue cycle are ICD-10 compliant. End-to-end testing is vital to confirm ICD-10 readiness. Without testing, problem areas are not recognized and will not get fixed, which places the transition at the greatest of failure. Request that each payer and vendor confirm system compliance in writing and set a date when testing will begin.  In addition, we always recommend that our clients call and, if possible, visit key payers to confirm their readiness.   A payer’s inability to commit to a testing date is a warning sign that warrants immediate follow-up.
  1. Align transition efforts and resources with top priority goals. Transition planning will highlight performance improvement opportunities across a range of systems — including IT, revenue cycle, clinical documentation, quality assurance, and EMR.  The variety of performance improvement opportunities sometimes results in an organization creating more goals than needed for a successful transition. Supplemental initiatives can be overwhelming to achieve with restricted resources in a limited timeframe.  The key is to identify “mission critical” transition objectives and allocate scarce resources accordingly.  Define clear objectives and create a detailed plan to monitor progress for achieving each goal.  For example:
    • Revenue cycle performance: Create benchmarks and dashboards for Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that routinely report system performance now and after ICD-10 go-live.
    • IT: Validate system interfaces and upgrades, and perform testing to ensure confirmation of claim submission data flow. Testing results will provide valuable guidance to remediation efforts.
    • Clinical documentation: Establish a Clinical Documentation Improvement Program (CDIP) to audit provider documentation and coding. The initiative should be designed to provide ongoing training, as well as measure progress while ensuring data integrity, medical necessity, and billing compliance.

Although the deadline may have shifted, healthcare organizations need to stay on track to make the necessary IT and systems changes needed to optimize performance now and in the future.

About Daniel M. Flanagan
Daniel M. Flanagan is a seasoned healthcare executive with 28 years of leadership experience in the health system, physician practice and managed care fields. His primary interest has been performance improvement, especially in revenue cycle operations, improvement plan development and implementation and strategic planning, budgeting and implementation. Mr. Flanagan understands the challenges posed by today’s environment and is experienced in helping clients identify and capitalize upon opportunities to improve organizational performance.

The Tyranny of “Time” – EHR Efficiency Has a Lifecycle

Posted on November 5, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I love when you can find a picture, chart or graph that describes an important concept. I saw that during a CHIME Fall Forum focus group that was led by Heather Haugen from The Breakaway Group. During the focus group, Heather put up the following slide to describe the level of optimization a hospital experiences during the lifecycle of an EHR.

EHR Adoption Optimization Lifecycle

The key element in the above graph is the trough that happens after the initial adoption. I think the slide into that trough of EHR inefficiency is as steep as what’s shown on the graph, but the dip in efficiency definitely occurs. In fact, I think that the path to inefficient EHR use is slow and that’s why many healthcare leaders don’t notice when it happens.

The solution to this problem is to create a program in your organization that manages upgrades, provides ongoing training, and regular workflow assessment and optimization. I imagine most organizations weren’t worried about this when they slapped in their EHR to meet meaningful use. However, now they’re all going to have to take a deep look into solving this long term problem.

Full Disclosure: The Breakaway Group is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts on EMR and HIPAA.

Killing Meaningful Use and Proposals to Change It

Posted on September 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Isn’t it nice that National Health IT Week brings people together to complain about meaningful use? Ok, that’s only partially in jest. Marc Probst, CIO of Intermountain and a member of the original meaningful use/EHR Certification committee (I lost track of the formal name), is making a strong statement as quoted by Don Fluckinger above.

Marc Probst is right that the majority of healthcare would be really happy to put a knife in meaningful use and move on from it. That’s kind of what I proposed when I suggested blowing up meaningful use. Not to mention my comments that meaningful use is on shaky ground. Comments from people like Marc Probst are proof of this fact.

In a related move, CHIME, AMDIS and 15 other healthcare organizations sent a letter to the HHS Secretary calling for immediate action to amend the 2015 meaningful use reporting period. These organizations believed that the final rule on meaningful use flexibility would change the reporting period, but it did not. It seems like they’re coming out guns blazing.

In even bigger news (albeit probably related), Congresswoman Renee Ellmers (R-NC) and Congressman Jim Matheson (D-UT) just introduced the Flexibility in Health IT Reporting (Flex-IT) act. This act would “allow providers to report their Health IT upgrades in 2015 through a 90-day reporting period as opposed to a full year.” I have yet to see any prediction on whether this act has enough support in Congress to get passed, but we could once again see congress act when CMS chose a different course of action like they did with ICD-10.

This story is definitely evolving and the pressure to change the reporting period to 90 days is on. My own personal prediction is that CMS will have to make the change. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Happy National Health IT Week!