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Can Cloud Computing Help Solve Healthcare’s Looming IT Crisis?

Posted on November 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The title of this post comes from a whitepaper called “How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Healthcare’s Looming IT Crisis” that was done by Intel together with CareCloud and terremark (A Verizon Company). My initial reaction when reading this whitepaper was “what looming healthcare IT crisis are they talking about?”

The whitepaper makes the general case about the challenges of so much regulation, security, and privacy issues related to healthcare IT. I guess that’s the crisis that they talk about. Certainly I agree that many a healthcare CIO is overwhelmed by the rate of change that’s happened in healthcare IT to date. Is it a crisis? Maybe in some organizations.

However, more core to what they discuss in the paper is whether cloud computing can provide some benefits to healthcare that many organizations aren’t experiencing today. The whitepaper cites a CDW study that just 30 percent of medical practices have transitioned to cloud computing services. No doubt I’ve seen the reluctance of many organizations to go with cloud computing. Although, as one hospital CIO told me, we have to do it.

The whitepaper makes the case that cloud computing can help with:
-Security, compliance and privacy
-Cost efficiency and improved focus
-Flexibility and scalability

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the whitepaper and its comments on the value of cloud computing. Should healthcare be shifting everything to cloud computing? Is there a case to be made for in house over cloud computing? Will some sort of hybrid approach win out?

Mobile Apps Pose Security Risks

Posted on July 11, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Mobile apps that share files via the cloud may be popular, but they pose risks in a clinical setting, according to a study reported by FierceMobileHealthcare.

The study, which was conducted by the Ponemon Institute, concluded that many health organizations aren’t taking the steps needed to guard protected health information on mobile devices and in the cloud.  In fact, more than half of respondents (54 percent) reported having an average of five data breaches involving the loss or theft of a mobile device containing  PHI, according to FierceMobileHealthcare.

About 33 percent of Ponemon respondents said they need to access PHI to do their work. That being said, only 15 percent of survey respondents were aware of HIPAA’s security requirements for regulated data on mobile devices.  This was the case despite the fact that 33 percent of respondents were part of a HIPAA-covered entity.

Meanwhile, 40 percent of respondents weren’t sure if their organization’s policies on employee access and use of regulated data on mobile devices were HIPAA-compliant. Twelve percent said they were compliant, 31 percent were partially compliant and 17 percent said they were noncompliant.

While healthcare organizations may be playing it a bit fast and loose where use of the cloud via mobile is concerned, they’re still being very cautious where other  uses of the cloud are concerned, FierceMobileHealthcare notes.

According to a recent survey by technology vendor CDW, healthcare organizations ranked seventh out of eight industries studied when it came to adoption of cloud computing.  According to CDW, healthcare leaders cited security concerns about proprietary data and applications as reasons they’d been reluctant to adopt cloud technology.

A Little Fun at #HIMSS13 – The Harlem Shake Meme

Posted on March 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A lot of business gets done at HIMSS. Although, I think that most would agree that one of the biggest values of going to HIMSS is the relationships you build which lead to business in the future. HIMSS often just lays the groundwork of relationships that can make future things happen.

With that in mind, it’s not surprising that there’s a lot of craziness that happens at HIMSS as well. Turns out a lot of people agreed that doing the Harlem Shake would be a great way to bond with people at HIMSS. Plus, I have to admit that I enjoy the break from the sometimes straight laced HIMSS event.

With that in mind, I’ve aggregated the Harlem Shake videos that were done at HIMSS 2013. They are all pretty entertaining to watch.

First up is a Harlem Shake at the Metro booth. This might be my favorite, because it includes a robot, a couple Healthcare Scene bloggers, and a number of #HITsm friends. I think you’ll enjoy it too. (Watch for the behind the scenes footage to be posted later).

Next up is the Emdeon Harlem Shake video. I love the girl in the chair that’s shaking while spinning. Too funny.

Finally, check out the CDW Harlem Shake. Nice job on the costumes for this one.

Nice work by all involved. I love seeing stuff like this since I think many take things a little bit too seriously. Nothing wrong with having a little fun in the process.

Do You Trust the Cloud for EHRs?

Posted on May 26, 2011 I Written By

A blog post today by Microsoft’s Dr. Bill Crounse got me thinking again about the cloud.

Crounse cited a new CDW poll showing that 30 percent of healthcare organizations could be considered “cloud adopters,” and for good reason. “The flexibility, scalability and lower costs associated with moving certain line of business applications to the cloud are compelling, especially for an industry like healthcare. After all, the primary focus of hospitals and clinics is caring for patients, not running an IT empire. There’s not a CIO, CFO, CEO, COO, CNO, CMIO, or CMO who wouldn’t love to shift some of their IT spending to delivering better care to the communities they serve,” Crounse wrote.

They were more likely to turn to the cloud for “commodity” services such as e-mail, file storage, videoconferencing and online learning. “Moving your ‘commodity’ applications to the cloud is an excellent place to start,” Crounse said. “I’d suggest first reaching out to your health industry peers and professional organizations to get a better sense of who’s doing what. I think when you’ve learned about some of the best health industry practices in cloud computing, you’ll be ready to explore what might be possible in your own organization.

But the fact that 30 percent of healthcare organizations use the cloud means that 70 percent do not. I suspect a lot of hospitals and physician practices still run aging, legacy client-server management systems in-house, just because that’s how people did things when those systems were first installed. As they replace their legacy technology, expect more healthcare organizations to opt for cloud services for these commodity-type services.

And what about clinical services?

At HIMSS11 back in February, Athenahealth honcho Jonathan Bush, a longtime fan of the cloud, told me he wanted to lead the “Cloud Cavalry” into Las Vegas (there’s no better place for an over-the-top spectacle, of course) next winter for HIMSS12. (See the second video for that.) Athenahealth, which has a certified, cloud-based EHR, straddles the line between clinical and administrative, and it’s not alone. I can’t think of a single ambulatory EHR vendor that doesn’t offer at least a cloud option if not a full-fledged SaaS product.

But is the cloud truly reliable for critical applications such as inpatient EHRs? In the wake of April’s Amazon EC2 cloud outage, I can imagine more than a few CIOs, practice managers and, especially, physicians are a bit skittish now.

What do you think?