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The Future is Now – Physician Discontent and Adopting EHRs Today – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on November 18, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer / Research Analyst at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc

In the movie Back to the Future II, a young man named Marty McFly and his time-traveling companion Doc Brown travel thirty years into the future—October 21 2015—to unite his parents and correct the space-time continuum. Although this “future” date occurred several weeks ago, the technological advancements presented in the movie are not far off from reality.  In the “future” Marty cruises around his home town on a new hoverboard and the sky is filled with mechanical drones. There are a few hologram images and people are dressed in brightly colored, plastic outfits. Aside from the fashion statement, many of these technological advancements are well under way. The future is now!

Not all technology has advanced as rapidly as depicted in the movie, though. From a health information technology (HIT) perspective, it often feels like we are back in 1985 dreaming of better technology.  Electronic health records (EHRs) present one of the biggest opportunities for improvement in healthcare.

A recent study published by the RAND Corporation and sponsored by the American Medical Association (AMA) examined how satisfied physicians are with their EHRs. It found that they approve of the concept of EHRs and are largely satisfied by the ability to remotely access patient information at any time. Most physicians, practice leaders, and staff also agreed that advancements in EHR technology such as improved interoperability and improved interfaces have great potential to improve care as well as physician and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, the current state of EHRs worsened overall professional satisfaction among respondents. Data entry, usability, inefficient workflows, and lack of interoperability were a few of the main pain points mentioned in the study.

A recent parody of Jay Z’s Empire State of Mind articulates many of these same frustrations. “Just a glorified billing system with patient info tacked on,” is one of the poignant lyrics mentioned in the video.  Many physicians are fantasizing about going “back to the future” or using a more sophisticated system.

In order to move forward in advancing EHRs and HIT, clinicians, support staff, and administration need to take responsibility for their organization’s initial technology investment. If data entry, usability, and inefficient workflows are causing pain, it is time to re-revaluate those clinical workflows and escalate system issues and enhancements to their vendors.

Each time I am onsite with a client preparing for go-live I am reminded of all the energy spent on implementing these systems. But it is equally important that clinical leaders re-evaluate their initial workflows and develop a plan for sustained use after the initial excitement has faded. And during this time, leaders must provide feedback and escalate system issues to their vendor.

Engaged clinical leadership is required to not only adopt the current state of EHRs but to transform the future of health information technology. How can clinical leaders do both? First, realize an EHR is not something you can throw-away or easily replace without enormous costs.  In our consumer-based culture, old technologies like cell phones or televisions are often thrown out for the latest advancements. Although EHRs are in many ways less sophisticated than some consumer-based applications, most of those applications (if not all) do not have the ability to improve patient care or patient safety. If using today’s EHR technology saves more lives than using paper alone, it is our collective responsibility to adopt these systems.

Once this paradigm shift has occurred and clinical leaders have made a sustained commitment to using EHRs, progressive and impactful change can occur. Conversations can begin to shift to improving clinical workflows, enhancing interfaces, improving interoperability, and utilizing health information exchanges. But these later conversations will never occur if the focus is on the initial difficulties and stress associated with implementing and using these systems. In order to live up to our vision of the “future,” we must accept the realities of today.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Department of Defense (DoD) EHR Project Opens Doors for HIT Vendors and Non-Vendors – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on August 19, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer / Research Analyst at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
Numerous medical advances can be traced back to development and research conducted by the U.S. military. In most instances, these developments were directly related to mitigating casualties and disease during times of war. The U.S. Civil War is seen as one of the most influential military events to advance modern medicine. Life-saving amputations, anesthesia, thoracic surgery, wound treatment, facial reconstruction, and the inception of the ambulance-to-ER transport system all originated with military intervention. While today’s medical advancements have certainly surpassed anything ever imagined by Civil War surgeons a century and a half ago, the model of healthcare innovations spurring from military initiatives remains steadfast. In fact, the U.S. military is one of the largest payers and providers within the modern day healthcare system, and the Department of Defense’s (DoD) current Electronic Health Records (EHR) project presents an unparalleled opportunity for development and implementation of an innovative solution that will inform advancement in both the military and private health systems. With this DoD decision, the contracted vendors will have opportunities and challenges to fulfill the reality of this EHR, and all other vendors will have an opportunity to innovate and capitalize on the private sector.

While the massive undertaking to update the DoD’s EHR system holds great promise, many health information technology experts have expressed skepticism surrounding the approach and associated costs of implementation via a complex public-private partnership model. Skeptics also continue to point to the failed implementation of as a litmus test for potential success. Potential pitfalls aside, the DoD EHR project does create opportunity for health information technology (HIT) vendors and start-ups across the industry who recognize that disruptive innovation can easily erupt in the private sector, and new market opportunities will arise as a result of this government-private sector partnership. Both critics and supporters should pay attention to the developments in the coming months.

The DoD contract will likely span 10 years with the aim of creating a new electronic health system to replace the DoD’s Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application (AHLTA). This collective effort, referred to as the Defense Healthcare Management System Modernization (DHMSM),  or “Dimsum” as commonly called by health IT insiders, creates opportunity for development of a commercial, off-the-shelf version of the government system. The price tag for this contracted venture is $4.34 billion, but that certainly may increase as development evolves. Compared to prior attempts by the DoD and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to create an integrated electronic health record at an estimated costs of $28 billion, the $4.34 billion price tag appears to offer staggering savings; however, the two projects differ greatly. The initial integrated EHR was scrapped due to cost estimates and disagreement between DoD and VA leadership, ultimately leading to DHMSM and the VA moving forward with a separate update to that EHR, which later became known as the Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (VistaA) program.  Despite leadership disagreements and technological difficulties, one of the goals of DHMSM is interoperability between the new DoD system and the VA system.

Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, articulated the need for interoperability between both military and private systems during a July 29 briefing. He stated that the goal is for the new military system and the private sector systems to become interoperable. If private sector health IT vendors – whether partners in the contract or not – figure out how to easily exchange data and communicate with other platforms, they will truly capitalize on this opportunity and improve care simultaneously.

Interoperability between private and military systems is underway. For example, the Military Health System in Colorado Springs, Colorado joined efforts with the Colorado Regional Information Organization (CORHIO) and is making progress with interoperability and data sharing through the utilization of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs). They are able to share patient information and data in both private and military health systems. As presented at this years’ HIMSS conference, the initial collaboration and efforts between the two organizations have shown promising results.

Dr. Karen DeSalvo, federal health IT coordinator, echoes further support and enthusiasm for DHMSM and private system interoperability. “[The DHMSM is] an important step toward achieving a nationwide interoperable health IT infrastructure.” As contributors to the Office of the National Coordinators Interoperability Roadmap, Dr. Karen DeSalvo and her cohorts appreciate the potential impact of establishing interoperability on such a large scale. It will be an incredible milestone in HIT history to attain true interoperability of military and private systems. Conversely, if large-scale interoperability is not achieved, it may lead to more spending and potentially the demise of the project altogether. To the chagrin of DHMSM supporters, this failure would only support assertions that the failed website was only the beginning of a litany of government HIT challenges. But given the track record of medical advances related to military research and development, the DHMSM project will likely achieve some level of interoperability and attain the goals set during the initial request-for-proposal phase.

The next opportunity and challenge is already happening. The selected DHMSM health IT vendors must maintain their private sector customer base while rapidly developing the new military system. This is no small task. Doing so will require additional resources and new partnerships to successfully manage this effort. It also means that if these vendors are not successful, their customer base may decide to switch EHRs and implement another EHR platform altogether. Either way, there are opportunities for HIT vendors and consultants to innovate and gain entry to new markets and customers.

Alternatively, the HIT vendors not selected for the DHMSM contract are positioned to innovate and create new technologies and supporting systems. Although the military is responsible for many medical advances, numerous technological advances have been developed in the private sector and can be traced to simple beginnings in a garage or dorm room without any direct military or government involvement. Those across the HIT marketplace have the opportunity and motivation to develop new, cutting-edge technology, by capitalizing upon the bright light currently being shone on new health technologies as a means of improving patient safety and health outcomes.

Data security is another area to pay attention to in the coming months. The DHMSM is an excellent opportunity to develop sophisticated systems to protect patient health information. Conversely, creating such a massive interoperable system opens up risk for data security of all integrated systems. In an age where devices, web searching, and systems leave a trail of bread crumbs and create an internet-of-things (ioT) or web of data points, the new DHMSM system must effectively protect this web of data to avoid compromising personal and national security.

We must also consider the ability to successfully implement and adopt the DHMSM system. This type of system will require a coordinated and focused effort of massive proportions. After coordinating logistics, adopting the new system will require another heroic level of effort. Difficulties may lie in establishing proper governance between the selected HIT vendors and military projects and ensuring that all companies involved have the stamina and focus for the entire life cycle of the system. The DoD began laying the foundation for governance structures during the initial proposal process, but it is yet to be seen if all involved parties will be able to adhere to the outlined parameters and work collaboratively to create their new DHMSM system. Additionally, once the system is designed and implemented, if proper funds are not available to sustain the system, the DoD would have to consider a potential redesign.

The military’s track record with medical advances positions them to successfully implement the new DHMSM system. Remarkably, this project has the potential to lay the foundation for interoperability and data security in the U.S. Despite the obvious challenges associated with the DHMSM EHR project, a system that is able to communicate and safely share data for large populations is worth the investment. From a global perspective, many countries are far ahead of the U.S. in designing and implementing national health records (e.g. Denmark, Finland, Sweden, UK, and Australia). There is also the potential for the DHMSM system to evolve one day into a national electronic health record, but doing so would require a national paradigm shift and lot more than $4.3 billion. Additionally, the challenges associated with this initial venture will surely be exacerbated due to the scale of the project and sheer importance. Health IT vendors and start-ups not directly involved in DHMSM should remain optimistic and on the lookout for new opportunities and challenges on the horizon. If the DoD and the contracted health IT vendors can successfully develop and deploy the DHMSM system, new opportunities, research and medical advances will likely follow.  It’s up to both HIT vendors and non-vendors of the DoD contract to decide whether they walk through this “door” of opportunity and make the most of this historic initiative.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Engaging Clinician Leadership to Adopt Healthcare Technology – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on April 15, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer / Research Analyst at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc

In many healthcare organizations, IT leaders are given the ultimate responsibility of implementing and adopting electronic health records (EHRs) and other health information technology (HIT) because the build and installation fall within their responsibility. While their technical skills and experience are necessary to select, install and maintain the HIT system, clinician leadership should ultimately own the use of the system.

Ownership of the system requires commitment to establish best practice workflows and system parameters that clinicians follow and evolve over time. The risk is that the technology won’t be used to its fullest potential and could even pose potential harm when used incorrectly or without knowledge of how information is entered, accessed, and used by other providers. In a recent alert from the Joint Commission, 23 percent of all reported HIT-related events were due to poor design and data associated with clinical content. Ensuring nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and other clinical staff are involved in decisions about how the system will be used will help alleviate these issues and ensure proper system use.

Over the years, The Breakaway Group’s research has shown that clinician leadership must be highly engaged to effectively adopt new EHRs and HIT systems. In fact, it is the most important predictor of successful EHR adoption. While clinician leader engagement may appear straightforward, competing priorities make it difficult to maintain the degree of engagement required after a new EHR system goes live.

For example, clinician leadership may see fewer patients or put certain responsibilities on hold until the system is implemented. In reality, responsibilities associated with the HIT system must shift and evolve among all stakeholders throughout the adoption journey. After go-live, clinician leadership involvement shifts from decisions around clinical applications and best practice workflows to decisions around upgrades, optimization of the system, and identifying workarounds. Both pre- and post-go-live responsibilities take time and need to align with the overall responsibilities for each role within the healthcare organization.

Involvement of clinician leadership early on in the adoption journey helps create a culture that embraces change and instills a sense of ownership to all levels in the organization. This cultural shift is not easy and requires the right mix of calculated planning and visionary leadership that must resonate with clinicians. A recent article published by The New York Times, describes the paradox of clinicians resisting new EHRs and creating “technology that physicians suddenly can’t live without.” On one hand this technology is causing resistance among clinicians to the point of reverting to paper, while on the other, this technology is helping mitigate countless medical errors and waste. Clinician leadership must engage to address both sentiments and create a culture conducive to change. With the rate of technological advances, a cultural status quo will not suffice.

Naturally clinicians are data scientists and lifelong learners. Show them data and provide them a comfortable learning environment to get up to speed quickly. Then they can help review the data and identify areas for improvement. For example, clinicians can query orders associated with quality outcomes such as electronic orders for flu vaccinations and determine if the rate ordered aligns with internal quality metrics. If the rate is below the agreed upon threshold, clinician leaders can focus efforts on systematically improving the rate ordered.

The longer clinician leadership involvement is delayed, the more likely resistance will fester and organizational culture will be at risk. Adopting technology, especially technology associated with government requirements, is painful and simply takes time. The difference is whether clinician leadership is involved early in the decision making process. If you do not want your clinician reverting to paper charts and/or throwing laptops and mobile devices out of sheer frustration, give clinicians the time and resources to fully engage in the adoption journey.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

The Future of Electronic Health Records in the US: Lessons Learned from the UK – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on December 17, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer / Research Analyst at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
With 2014 coming to a close, there is a natural tendency to reflect on the accomplishments of the year. We gauge our annual successes through comparison with expected outcomes, industry standards, and satisfaction with the work done. To continue momentum and improve outcomes in the coming years we look for fresh ideas. For example, healthcare organizations can compare their efforts with similar types of organizations both locally and abroad. In the United States, looking beyond our existing borders toward the international community can provide valuable insight. Many other nations such as the UK, are further down the path of providing national healthcare and adopting electronic health records. In fact, the National Health Service (NHS) of UK has started plans to allow access of  Electronic Health Records (EHR) on Smartphones through approved health apps. Although healthcare industry standards appear to be in constant flux, these valuable international lessons can help local healthcare leaders develop strategies for 2015 and beyond.

By the year 2024, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) aims to improve population health through the interoperable exchange of health information, and the utilization of research and evidence-based medicine. These bold and inspiring goals are outlined in their 10 Year Vision to Achieve Interoperable Health IT Infrastructure, also known as ONC’s interoperability road map. This document provides initial guidance on how the US will lay the foundation for EHR adoption and interoperable Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) systems. ONC has also issued the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan 2015-2020. This strategy aims to improve national interoperability, patient engagement, and expansion of IT into long-term care and mental health. Achieving these audacious goals seems quite challenging but a necessary step in improving population health.

EHR Adoption in UK
The US is not alone in their EHR adoption and interoperability goals. Many nations in our international community are years ahead of the US in terms of EHR implementation and utilization. Just across the Atlantic Ocean, the United Kingdom has already begun addressing opportunities and challenges with EHR adoption and interoperability. In their latest proposal the NHS has outlined their future vision for personalized health care in 2020. This proposal discusses the UK’s strategy for integrating HIT systems into a national system in a meaningful way. This language is quite similar to Meaningful Use and ONC’s interoperability roadmap in the United States. With such HIT parallels much could be learned from the UK as the US progresses toward interoperability.

The UK began their national EHR journey in the 1990s with incentivizing the implementation of EHR systems. Although approximately 96 percent of all general provider practices use EHRs in the UK, only a small percentage of practices have adopted their systems. Clinicians in the UK are slow to share records electronically with patients or with their nation’s central database, the Spine.

Collaborative Approach
In the NHS’s Five Year Forward View they attempt to address these issues and provide guidance on how health organization can achieve EHR adoption with constrained resources. One of the strongest themes in the address is the need for a collaborative approach. The EHRs in the UK were procured centrally as part of their initial national IT strategy. Despite the variety of HIT systems, this top-down approach caused some resentment among the local regions and clinics. So although these HIT systems are implemented, clinicians have been slow to adopt the systems to their full potential. (Sarah P Slight, et al. (2014). A qualitative study to identify the cost categories associated with electronic health record implementation in the UK. JAMIA, 21:e226-e231) To overcome this resistance, the NHS must follow their recommendations and work collaboratively with clinical leadership at the local level to empower technology adoption and ownership. Overcoming resistance to change takes time, especially on such a large national scale.

Standard Education Approach
Before the UK can achieve adoption and interoperability, standardization must occur. Variation in system use and associated quality outcomes can cause further issues. EHR selection was largely controlled by the government, whereas local regions and clinics took varied approaches to implementing and educating their staff. “Letting a thousand flowers bloom” is often the analogy used when referring to the UK’s initial EHR strategy. Each hospital and clinic had the autonomy of deciding on their own training strategy which consisted of one-on-one training, classroom training, mass training, or a combination of training methods. They struggled to back-fill positions to allow clinicians time to learn the new system. This process was also expensive. At one hospital £750 000 (over $1.1 million US) was spent to back-fill clinical staff at one hospital to allow for attendance to training sessions. This expensive and varied approach to training makes it difficult to ensure proficient system use, end-user knowledge and confidence, and consistent data entry. In the US we also must address issues of consistency in our training to increase end-user proficiency levels. Otherwise the data being entered and shared is of little value.

One way to ensure consistent training and education is to develop a role-based education plan that provides only the details that clinicians need to know to perform their workflow. This strategy is more cost-effective and quickly builds end-user knowledge and confidence. In turn, as end-user knowledge and confidence builds, end users are more likely to adopt new technologies. Additionally, as staff and systems change, plans must address how to re-engage and educate clinicians on the latest workflows and templates to ensure standardized data entry. If the goal is to connect and share health information (interoperability), clinicians must follow best-practice workflows in order to capture consistent data.  One way to bridge this gap is through standardized role-based education.

Whether in the US or UK, adopting HIT systems require a comprehensive IT strategy that includes engaged leadership, qualitative and quantitative metrics, education and training, and a commitment to sustain the overall effort.  Although the structure of health care systems in the US and UK are different, many lessons can be learned and shared about implementing and adopting HIT systems. The US can further research benefits and challenges associated with the Spine, UK’s central database as the country moves toward interoperability. Whereas the UK can learn from education and change management approaches utilized in US healthcare organizations with higher levels of EHR adoption. Regardless of the continent, improving population health by harnessing available technologies is the ultimate goal of health IT.  As 2015 and beyond approaches, collaborate with your stakeholders both locally and abroad to obtain fresh ideas and ensure your healthcare organization moves toward EHR adoption.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Work IT! Optimize Health Technology with EHR Adoption – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on August 20, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer / Research Analyst at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Investing in an electronic health record (EHR) is largely based on the decision to improve patient safety, align with clinical guidelines, enhance revenue cycle times, and capture government-based incentives. But without a proper EHR adoption plan in place, healthcare providers risk never optimizing their investment and achieving their intended goals.

Once an EHR is implemented, healthcare organizations must continue striving toward their goals to optimize their systems. Improving workflows, establishing best practices and increasing overall proficiency of end-users in this application are all components of optimization. Healthcare organizations that are able to maintain this level of focus will see improved clinical and financial outcomes.

This process isn’t easy and requires a commitment to the initial performance metrics that drove the healthcare organization to purchase the new system. Today, nearly half of all healthcare organizations use an EHR, but many struggle to ensure it provides clinical value across the organization. They carefully select and implement systems but fail to make the tool work as originally envisioned. Just because they bought a new EHR doesn’t mean it is serving their patients, providers, or bottom line.

A parallel comparison can be made with buying a high-end, a mobile exercise device to track aerobic and anaerobic steps. Individuals seeking a healthier lifestyle invest in these devices, hoping it will help them achieve their personal health goals. After making the initial investment and adapting daily habits to wear the device, one can begin to adopt the technology to achieve improved health goals. But realizing these goals takes work and commitment. If performance is not monitored, results can plateau and, in some cases, regress. This could result in a growing waist line for the person trying to lose weight, an ironic and unfortunate twist. For healthcare organizations, their growing waistline is unhealthy organizational performance, visible through increases in adverse drug events, recurrent admissions, revenue cycle times and government penalties, all symptoms of goal misalignment. The more healthcare organizations look away from their initial performance goals and utilize EHRs for data storage only, the more noticeable the symptoms become. Both individuals and healthcare organizations can benefit from the process of system optimization to make the tool work for the betterment of the individual or organization.

Extensive research has been conducted by The Breakaway Group (TBG), A Xerox Company, to identify elements that lead to optimization. TBG reports the key adoption elements exhibited by healthcare organizations that optimize their EHRs:

Engaged and Clinically Focused Leadership
Healthcare organizations must demonstrate engaged and clinically focused leadership. Clinical leaders must align their EHR by refining workflows, templates, utilization, and reporting to meet their organizations’ clinical and financial goals. The Chief Medical Information Officer (CMIO) is well suited for this venture.

Targeted Education and Communication
Healthcare organizations must provide targeted education and communication.  When system upgrades are released, organizations must effectively and efficiently educate end users to alleviate reductions in proficiency and productivity.

Comprehensive Metrics
Healthcare organizations must be able to use EHR data.  Organizations must move past the superficial use of an EHR and begin to analyze what is entered. The EHR is of little value, if the data is neither clinically valuable nor used.

Sustained Planning and Focus
Healthcare organizations must sustain planning and focus. Change occurs frequently in healthcare, so system optimization requires preparation, adjustment and real-time communication.

With these adoption elements, healthcare organizations can make their technology work as originally intended—to improve patient and financial outcomes. To overcome the EHR implementation plateau, they must focus on their original performance goals to truly optimize health information technology systems. This process isn’t easy. It requires endurance, but the payoff is worth it. It’s time to “Breakaway” from the status quo and work IT– by optimizing use of HIT systems!

Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Meaningful Use Playbook 2014: Overcoming Adversity – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on February 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
I apologize in advance, but I am still mourning the Super Bowl loss of the Denver Broncos. I can’t stop replaying each moment and thinking of alternative scenarios. What if Peyton Manning utilized a quick huddle instead of audibles and hand-signals? What if Denver’s defense had better protected Peyton? What if the Broncos had scored more than eight points?

Regardless of the what-ifs and wounds resulting from the loss, the team has to step up and prepare for the next season, if they want to finish at the top. In the healthcare world, providers must also change their playbook and approach, if they wish to capitalize on the next phase of Meaningful Use.

For the past year, providers have been scrambling to select, implement or optimize a new electronic health record system to meet federal requirements for Meaningful Use Stage 1. Adding to providers’ challenges is the evolving nature of the rules for achieving meaningful use incentives; federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is constantly updating the Meaningful Use Playbook. Similar to football players at the end of the season, providers are tired and wounded. However, they must be aware of and prepare to take on the new requirements for 2014. Otherwise, they risk future penalties and foregoing funds. To help healthcare providers prepare for this new season, here is a summary of changes taking effect this year.

  • Three-month reporting period
    All providers are now required, regardless of their stage of meaningful use, to demonstrate meaningful use for a three-month EHR reporting period. Medicare providers may elect to report clinical quality measures (CQM) for the entire year or select an optional, three-month reporting period for CQMs that is identical to their meaningful use reporting.
  • Exclusions and vital sign objectives
    All eligible professionals, eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals are now responsible for adhering to the latest changes in Meaningful Use Stage 1. This includes new requirements for electing exclusions toward menu objectives, age limits for recording and charting changes to vital signs, and new exclusions toward reporting height, weight and blood pressure.
  • View, download and transmit all health information or admissions online
    To better align with the new capabilities of certified EHR technology, CMS is replacing Meaningful Use Stage 1 objectives for accessing information online with the capacity to view, download and transmit this information.
  • Reporting of clinical quality measures
    All providers, regardless of their stage of meaningful use, must report on clinical quality measures to CMS. Eligible hospitals must report 16 of the 29 CQMs and eligible providers must report 9 of the 64 CQMs.(Source)

For providers making the leap to Stage 2 of meaningful use, this is only the beginning. Not only must they abide to the changes mentioned above, but they also need to plan and execute a strategy for integrating diverse IT systems and engaging patients. Neither are simple tasks. However, just as I believe that Peyton can shake this last performance and finish strong next year, I believe in the resiliency of providers too. With the right leadership and planning, they will take patient care to the next level.

Omaha! Omaha! Omaha!
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Healthcare Innovation in a Brave New World – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on December 18, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
Healthcare providers are faced with a two-pronged challenge of satisfying government regulations and being profitable within a competitive and dynamic marketplace. Organizations that prosper take advantage of what’s going on in Washington and offer innovative products and services to their patient population. At the forefront of healthcare innovation is utilizing data from Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to provide better and more affordable care while preventing medical errors.

The November edition of United Airlines’ Hemisphere magazine highlighted several leading American hospitals that demonstrate innovative approaches to healthcare. The article addresses legislative pressures that hospitals face and the need for transparency as patients seek the best treatments and services across larger geographical boundaries. Many of the top performing hospitals utilize consultants outside of healthcare to obtain fresh perspectives and remain competitive. At Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Dr. John Perentesis, co-director of the Cancer and Blood Disease Institute, shares collaboration with “…consultants in the airline and nuclear power industries reduce errors in human factors. In many ways, the hospital is similar to a United Airlines cockpit.”  Other hospitals pursue innovation by implementing the most advanced procedures and techniques to provide advanced patient-centric healthcare.

The comparison of healthcare with the airline industry or any other service industry is not too far-fetched. In fact, the founder of The Breakaway Group, Charles Fred, brought his experience in the aerospace industry to help healthcare organizations and providers transition from paper records to electronic systems. The Breakaway Group utilizes targeted role-based simulations to help clinicians rapidly learn new healthcare software systems. Simulation learning was a commonly used method when the aviation industry transitioned from analog to digital systems. This is only one example of the many innovations that occur when incorporating an outside perspective. Whoever thought we would use 3-D printers for facial transplant reconstruction?[1] Pretty amazing.

Furthermore, as healthcare organizations start to look inward and analyze their EHR data, it may be helpful to continue to look outward to other industries. In his article, The Data Drive Society, author and M.I.T. professor Alex Pentland[2] discusses the digital breadcrumbs left behind by individuals going about their daily lives, the free flow of information and ideas outside of our immediate social networks, and the power and responsibility behind analyzing this data.  Essentially, every time we make a transaction, update our Facebook status, or send a text message, we leave a digital breadcrumb. Over time, these breadcrumbs create a dynamic social map. This map could be used to design improved systems for the government and even for healthcare to operate in a more efficient and effective manner. However, with access to data lies responsibility. Pentland argues that although we could access every single digital breadcrumb available about a population, we might need to ask for permission. Individuals should have the right to control their own data and opt out of sharing their information.

So as healthcare begins to remove barriers to accessing and analyzing data from EHRs, we may need to circle back to our legislative body to ensure individual data rights are protected. Although open access to patient data appears to be the ultimate solution, in actuality, it is only the beginning and requires deeper thought. We must balance the desire to analyze and innovate with respect for individual data rights; otherwise classical novels such as George Orwell’s 1984 or Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World may foreshadow the future inevitability of our society.

But all is not so dire. Go forth and collaborate with outside experts and historians to develop and design solutions for healthcare in the 21st century and beyond.  Be bold. Be innovative. Just don’t forget the ethical stuff.

[2] The author, Alex “Sandy” directs the M.I.T. Human Dynamics Laboratory and co-leads the World Economic Forum’s big data and personal data initiatives.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.