Profound Message About End of Life in ZDoggMD Video

Posted on August 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ZDoggMD recently teamed up with Wake Up The Movie (Coming Fall 2016) to create this profound video talking about End of Life and important topics like advanced directives. Without further ado, check out the video below:

The stories are starting to pile up in the comments of the video on YouTube. It’s amazing to read the stories about end of life. Here’s one from an EHR doc that stood out to me:

This is genius. I’m an ER doc, and I’ve done CPR on too many people who, had they just understood, would have opted for a DNR and died in a more dignified and humane way. I am all for life-saving measures, but reality is less glamorous and less optimistic than TV makes it out to be. People with advanced illness, or even simply advanced age, should really consider what they expect from their future and weigh that against the idea of being tortured on a gurney with the small chance of survival, only to be miserable in a hospital bed with an even smaller chance of returning to a normal or even fair quality of life. At this point in my life, of course, I would opt for all life-saving measures for myself (though I would rather be dead than be chronically in a vegetative state), but at some point in life, the scales should tip. Ignoring the issue and just accepting the default potentially leads to increased sadness and anguish for yourself and your loved ones down the road.

I’ve heard some of my geriatric doctor friends comment that we need to start having more meaningful discussions about end of life. I think that’s true. It’s a challenging discussion that nobody really wants to have, but it’s an important one. I know I was brought to tears when my wife and I have sat down and talked about many of the issues related to it. It’s not an easy topic, but I’m glad we’ve had the discussion and put our desires in writing. Now we just need EHRs and PHRs to support advance directives better than most do today.