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Vendor Creates EMR For Google Glass

Posted on June 20, 2014 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Well, here’s an interesting development. An EMR company has created an app allowing doctors using Google Glass to store patient data on a cloud-based storage and collaboration site.

The vendor, California-based Drchrono, is claiming that the application is the first “wearable health record.”  Whether or not that’s the case, this is clearly a step forward in the development of Google Glass as a practical tool for doctors.

According to a Reuters report, Drchrono worked closely with cloud-based storage and collaboration service Box along with Google Glass to create the app.

The new Google Glass at allows doctors — with the patient’s permission — to use Google Glass to record a consultation or surgery. Once the work is done, physician can store the video, as well as photographs and notes, and the patient’s EMR or in Box. The app also allows the data to  be shared with the patient.

The app is still in its infancy — so far, just 300 of the 60,000 doctors using Drchrono’s EMR platform have opted to use the Google Glass app, which is currently available at no cost to users.

But Google Glass apps and options are clearly on the rise, and not just among providers. A recent study by Accenture found that consumers are are very interested in wearable technology; they’re particularly interested in wearable smart glasses like Google Glass as well as smart watches.

As things stand, devices like Google Glass are in the very early adoption stage, so it’s not surprising that few of Drchrono’s physician users have opted to try out the new app. But things are likely to change over the next year or two.

I believe Google Glass will follow the same trajectory the iPad did in medicine. First it was a toy for the well-financed, curious and tech savvy, then an option for early adopters in medicine, then eventually a tool that made sense for nearly every provider.

For the next year or two, most Google Glass announcements will be like this one, reports of experiments whose only uptake will come from leading-edge experimenters in medical technology. But within the next two years or so, Google Glass uses will proliferate, as will the apps that make them a worthwhile investment.

This level of success isn’t inevitable, but it is likely. I’d bet good money that two years from now, you may be reading this blog on a Google Glass app and managing your EMR through one as well.  It’s just a matter of time.

Are Patient Portals Really Helping Patients?

Posted on December 4, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

One thing’s for sure about patient portals: They’re a hot commodity.

What’s less clear is how much good they’re doing for health care.

The popularity of patient portals stems from Meaningful Use Stage 2 patient-engagement requirements. The market for the products is expected to approach $900 million by 2017, up from $280 million in 2012, according to a report from Mountain View, Calif.-based research firm Frost & Sullivan.

Patients like at least one aspect of the portals — the ability to access their own medical records. In a recent Accenture study, more than 40 percent of consumers who can’t access their own records online said they’d consider switching doctors in order to get access.

But several recent studies suggest that currently available products have a way to go before they can consistently improve care, reduce costs or perhaps even increase patient engagement.

In a review of 46 studies, researchers found little evidence that portals were helping much of anything. The doctors from Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System and other institutions wrote that it’s “unlikely that patient portals will have substantial effects on utilization or efficiency, at least in the near term.”

Some of the limitations of the products, they wrote, included “disparities in who accesses these portals and instances of suboptimal patient attitudes of their worth.” The portals typically gave patients options such as looking at their test results, refilling prescriptions and communicating with doctors.

Patient portals likely are most beneficial, the authors wrote, when they’re part of a more comprehensive quality-improvement strategy.

Another study also found that patients, in many cases, fail to see the value of a portal — or at least some parts of it. In questions about hypothetical features, consumers showed interest in “back-office” tasks such as seeing their own medical records. But clinical digital communication capabilities, such as online video consultations with doctors, failed to impress.

The bottom line was that patient portals “may act as a complement to health-care service delivery, while substitution for clinical in-person interactions may not be viewed positively.” In other words, most people just don’t seem to be ready to give up face time with their primary-care physician.

When MU2 starts on Jan. 1, physicians will be required to give their patients electronic access to their health records. The requirement went into effect for hospitals in October.

The U.S. health care system is, with government prodding, investing a huge sum in patient portals. The idea sounds empowering for patients. But given the lack of solid evidence for a benefit at this point, it’s concerning to think the money might be better spent on something else. Let’s hope that vendors and providers are soon able to turn portals into something with tangible benefits for quality care.

4 Reasons U.S. EMR Firms Won’t Try China

Posted on October 23, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

If you have something to sell, chances are you’ve thought about selling it in China.

With a population of 1.35 billion, it’s become an attractive market for U.S. companies pushing everything from athletic shoes to light trucks to Tide. Given the natural limits of their home market, you’d assume that American EMR firms would eventually size up China’s nascent health IT scene.

And it’s likely they have. In a report a few years ago, 100 percent of vendors surveyed told the consulting firm Accenture that they saw global markets as an opportunity in the long term.

But health IT doesn’t export quite as easily as Pringles and KFC. I’ve seen China’s healthcare system up close several times, and if you ask me, making headway in the world’s most populous nation will be beyond difficult.

China, which is in the midst of its own health care reform, could certainly be tempting for companies such as Epic, McKesson and Cerner. As Benjamin Shobert wrote for Forbes, the country in 2009 extended basic health coverage to 97 percent of its citizens. It also promised to build 31,000 hospitals, upgrade 5,000 existing ones and train 150,000 new primary-care doctors.

McKinsey & Co. last year said health care spending in China would grow to $1 trillion in 2020 from $375 million in 2011.

Meanwhile, U.S. EMR companies are going to need new markets to conquer. Estimates of how much growth potential is left are many and varied. But no matter how you look at it, at some point every American healthcare organization of any size will have an EMR. Millennium Research Group last month predicted declining EMR-industry revenue from this year on because of “market saturation.”

Of course, plenty of IT firms, including Oracle and IBM, have a major presence in China. But the China market won’t happen in a significant way for U.S. health IT companies any time soon, and here’s why:

  • China’s healthcare is different. The private physician’s office that Americans are used to is more or less nonexistent. You go to a hospital-based clinic and see the doctor who’s available. Patient privacy hasn’t taken hold, so there could be other clinic-goers and family members milling about near — or in — your exam room. Chinese traditional medicine is practiced alongside the “Western” variety. Even with insurance, you typically pay up front and get reimbursed later. A U.S.-centric EMR would not map neatly onto China’s workflows. There’s an overview of China’s system here. I’ve written about a Chinese dental clinic here.
  • No one understands China’s health IT. OK, I’m sure some people do, and I hope they comment. But it’s a challenge. The health information firm KLAS Enterprises isn’t even attempting to cover China. A KLAS executive vice president, Jared Peterson, told Modern Healthcare, “The Chinese market, that’s a big mystery.” Meanwhile, Accenture omitted China from its 2010 report “Overview of International EMR/EHR Markets” because of “conflicting opinions of overall EMR maturity.”
  • The language barrier will be formidable. Epic CEO Judith Faulkner told Modern Healthcare how her company had adapted its system for another language. “We’ve only done it once, for Dutch,” she said in January 2012. “It’s a lot of mapping. It’s a task, but it hasn’t been that bad of a task.” But Dutch is not Chinese, and Chinese doesn’t use the Roman alphabet. I’m betting that when you throw Chinese characters into the mix, the conversion will be “that bad of a task” and then some.
  • Cloud-based systems could raise security issues. Some experts expect cloud-based services to play a significant role as health IT spreads to developing countries. But according to a U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission report, “Regulations requiring foreign firms to enter into joint cooperative arrangements with Chinese companies in order to offer cloud computing services may jeopardize the foreign firms’ information security arrangements.”

It’s worth mentioning that three years ago, China was mentioned as Cerner announced plans to develop global markets. It wanted to get into emerging regions before its U.S.-based competitors did.

There’s not much sign of life now in any China-related plans the company might have had, though. According to a message from Chad Haynes, managing director for Cerner Asia, on the firm’s website: “We look forward to improving the health of communities in ASEAN, China, and beyond.”

In the case of China, that could be a while.

Telemedicine, Accenture, and Influenza App – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on January 27, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and EHR

When The EMR *Is* The Problem

Anne Zieger talks about a recent experience at the doctor’s office that took more time than it needed to because of an EMR. While EMRs are meant to increase efficiency and workflow, it isn’t always the case. How can these problems be addressed?

New Telemedicine Starts Bode Well For EMRs

Jennifer Dennard interviewed Sande Olson, a senior health consultant at Olson & Associates about the future of telemedicine technology. She discusses how it has changed recently, a possible trick down effect from the ACA, and integration of telemedicine into EMRs.

Hospital EMR and EHR

What Hospitals Can Learn From Hospitals

Airports are crowded, filled with germs, and just frustrating sometimes. However, there are a few things, technology-wise, that airports do well with, and hospitals should pay attention to. This post talks about three different things hospitals can learn from airports, including having kiosks and big screen displays.

Accenture: Five Questions Hospital Boards Should Ask Before EMR Buys

A study done by Accenture found that about four percent of hospitals will be making an EMR purchase in the next year. Partly because of this, Accenture has compiled a list of questions that should be asked before purchasing an EMR.  They suggest having these questions answered by an independent analysis of EMR vendors.

Smart Phone Healthcare 

CDC Release Influenza App

The CDC has released another app. This time, it focuses on the flu. Because this year’s flu season has run rampant throughout the United States, this app can be very helpful, particularly for physicians. It contains information concerning where outbreaks are happening, the vaccine, and tips on how to stay healthy.

Discussion About EMR Study by Accenture

Posted on April 1, 2010 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the first people I talked with when I arrived at HIMSS was a meeting with Dr. Greg Parston from Accenture. Dr. Parston has an interesting job at Accenture since it seems like he gets paid to just study interesting topics. Not a bad gig.

Well, it turns out that Accenture and Dr. Parston had been working on a few studies related to EMR (imagine that). So, we had a really interesting discussion about the findings of their survey and Dr. Parston even made some predictions about the future of the EMR market. The following are some of the takeaways I thought were interesting from our discussion:

First some details about the survey. It was a survey of 1000 doctors done in December of 2009 from all over the country. They showed a 15% percent adoption rate for EMR, or basically in line with most of the other projections of EMR adoption.

The study then took a look at the next 24 months and these doctors plans for that time period. They found that 60% intend to purchase an EMR system in the next 24 months. However, if you look at just those doctors that were under 55, the number intending to purchase an EMR is 80 percent.

A few other interesting things about their motivations and size. They found that the stimulus money was the number 1 factor for wanting to implement an EMR. I guess this isn’t surprising, but it’s unfortunate. Sure seems like a hard thing to reconcile when I think that most doctors want to use technology to become more efficient. Yet, there number one motivation (EMR Stimulus money) does nothing to improve productivity. An EMR might increase your productivity, but “meaningful use” and “certified EHR” don’t help with that.

Dr. Parston also mentioned that doctors want to control their data. Imagine that! Sorry hospitals and SaaS EMR (except for those SaaS EMR that give doctors their data, I’m not talking to you).

The most interesting part of our conversation was that Dr. Parston projected that there would be 70 percent EHR adoption in 3 years. I posted that to twitter right after he said it to a mixed response with more people saying that won’t happen. What do you think about this? That’s a pretty lofty projection if you ask me. I’ll be surprised if we top 50% EHR adoption in 3 years.

Finally, Dr. Parston also mentioned that in one of his EMR studies they found that 70 of Americans said it was very important or important for a doctor to have EMR. This number kind of bothers me, because I just don’t see this same patient demand for doctors to use an EMR. You may remember that I’ve written a few times about EMR adoption waiting for consumer demand for EMR. So, I think this will happen at some point. I just don’t think we’re there yet.