Healthcare Applies Innovation from Other Industries for Big Impact – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on March 18, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer Bergeron

Healthcare is applying innovations from other industries to make advancements in the study of disease, surgery, and research. If you’re fascinated by new ways to use everyday tools and at the same time make life easier, also known as lifehacks, you can appreciate the same concept in healthcare.

3D imaging, cellphone camera technology, and sonograms like those used in underwater navigation are all being used in healthcare. Let’s begin with a look at cellphone technology and one way it is being applied to healthcare.

UCLA researchers developed a lens-free microscope that, through a series of steps, allows tissue samples to be formed into a 3D image using a microchip that is the same type found in your cellphone camera. The image shows contrast so the researcher can see tissue depth. This lens-free microscope also offers a broader, clearer view than conventional microscopes. The result is that “the pathologist’s diagnosis using the lens-free microscopic images proved accurate 99% of the time”, according to a recent study.   In order to apply this same concept to disease, imagine that a researcher could isolate a section of diseased tissue, remove it from its environment, color code the tissue to easily spot abnormalities, and have the ability to study it from all angles. reminds us that lasers, used in missile defense, in the world’s fastest camera (which takes 6.1 million pictures per second), in entertainment devices such as Blu-ray players, and in grocery check-out lines, are also used in surgery and diagnoses. Lasers can decrease the diagnosis time and cause less disruption to a patient’s comfort. Zero-dilation Scanning Laser Opthmalogy (cSLO), a new imaging technique, can diagnose a patient with diabetic retinopathy, which causes progressive damage to the retina, in as little as 3 minutes.

Technology is not only impacting the patient experience, but how caregivers are brought up to speed on new technologies. In fact, the founder of The Breakaway Group based the company’s electronic health record (EHR) learning concept on flight simulation. Flight simulators train pilots how to maneuver in extreme circumstances, situations that would be difficult to create in real life. At The Breakaway Group, we use simulation technology to increase adoption of EHRs by training providers, nurses, and healthcare professionals.

Speed to proficiency, one of four key adoption elements of The Breakaway Method, provides learners with real-life situations in a safe environment.  Learners can quickly experience many different circumstances, fail, and learn to complete tasks correctly, all without affecting patient outcomes. In addition, The Breakaway Group can cut classroom time in half on average by using simulations.

Healthcare is reaching into other industries to become more efficient and effective. Whenever information is shared and innovations are repurposed to make a process better, we all benefit.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training.