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Patient Shark Tank at Digital Health Conference

Posted on October 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ve been working with NYeC to promote the Digital Health Conference since the very first Digital Health Conference 4 years ago. It’s a great event and I get a chance to meet many of you readers there. Plus, I just love spending time in NYC. If you’ve never been, you can register here (20% off your registration when you use the discount code: HCS).

I just heard about a new feature at the conference this year: The Patient Shark Tank. Here’s a description of what they have in store:

How do we ensure that the patient voice is amplified in the design, the development, or enhancement of innovations created FOR the patient? Patient communities are emerging as key influencers and disrupting the healthcare landscape. They are impacting strategies, policies, and setting the stage for new patient-centric innovations. Patients are now sought after thought leaders influencing the way healthcare systems think about and interact with patients and prodding them to improve the patient experience.

Join us as our judges rate innovations from the patient and caregiver perspective and innovators build their perspective into the innovations designed to serve them. As each innovator pitches their concept or initiative, our patient and caregiver panelists will ask targeted questions based on their experiences to understand how the innovation uniquely addresses patient needs. In addition, we will integrate clinician perspective to understand whether a doctor would prescribe the innovation to their patients.

I’m a huge fan of Shark Tank, so I love the idea. I only hope that they’ve got a line up of judges that are as entertaining as Shark Tank. Sometimes these events can get pretty bland if they choose judges who are shy about sharing their opinions on a company or product. That doesn’t benefit the companies or the audience.

Unfortunately, you won’t have much time to get your idea submitted. The deadline to apply to pitch your innovative concept or initiative is Thursday, October 16th. I look forward to seeing what ideas get pitched at the event.

Building Accountability and Consistency Into Your Healthcare Practice

Posted on October 9, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum as part of the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with him on Twitter @ClinicSpectrum and @csvishal2222.
Vishal Gandhi
One of the biggest challenges a leader in any organization faces is building accountability into their workflow. While we’d all like to think that we’re hiring great people that will always work at a high level, we all know that even the best people’s work improves when you build in some accountability for the work they do.

What I’ve found in the hundreds of practices I’ve seen is that the majority of people in a medical practice are working hard. Sure, there are the outliers that are just coasting through the day, watching the clock for when they can punch out, but we all can recognize and deal with those people pretty well. The harder challenge is those staff who are working really hard, but are busy working on the wrong things.

How do you make sure that someone in your practice is working on the right things? The simple answer is to track and report on the work that matters most in your office. In some cases, this report can be something as simple as a text message or email. In other cases, you might automate the reporting so that the accountability is built directly into the practice’s regular workflow.

Reporting and accountability is an extremely powerful concept for a practice. Not only does it ensure that the practice is working on the right things, but it improves productivity as well. Reports that are collected and checked regularly encourage your employees to work harder and be more productive. It’s just human nature for people to want to look good on a report. This is a powerful part of accountability and reporting.

However, let me offer a few words of caution when it comes to measuring, tracking, and reporting on productivity in your office. First, make sure that you’re clear with your staff on why these reports are important to the office. Second, be sure they understand that you’ll be working together with them to make sure that you’re tracking and reporting is accurate and focused on the right things. Accountability and reporting is a double edged sword. If you’re tracking the right things, it can lead to tremendous results. If you’re tracking the wrong things, it can lead to negative results. Don’t be afraid to make adjustments to what you’re doing. Also, be generous with your staff and understanding when something doesn’t look or feel right. Dig into the data with them to find the real story before jumping to conclusions. Then, make corrections if necessary.

Be sure to leverage technology where it makes sense to automatically track and report the data that matters. Your goal should be to work with your staff to create a consistent and expected workflow that efficiently measures and reports on the key metrics for your organization. Not only will this consistency make your staff more efficient, but it will make it much easier when staff don’t show up to work due to some family emergency or the inevitable staff turnover.

When you create a practice that is process dependent instead of people dependent, it opens up all sorts of options and flexibility for your practice. This shift in mentality provides a buffer where a strategic sourcing partner can cover any “down time” your office may experience during staff emergencies or staff turnover. Plus, your ongoing tracking and reporting is the perfect way to hold this sourcing partner accountable for the work they do for your practice.

These measurements and reports also serve as a baseline benchmark for your practice going forward. As your staff turns over, you can easily assess the health of your practice and the quality of your future hires using these benchmarks. Plus, as you improve your clinic’s efficiency, you and your staff will be able to celebrate the success of beating previous benchmarks. In future posts, we’ll look at what benchmarks matter most and comparing your practice’s benchmarks against national benchmark data.

The Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts is sponsored by ClinicSpectrum, a leading provider of workflow automation solutions for healthcare. Their Productivity Spectrum product provides a simple monitoring tool that provides time clock functionality, benchmarking and compliance, performance analysis, and productivity management for clinical practices. Stop by the ClinicSpectrum booth at MGMA (Booth 330) for more info.

Meaningful Use Hardship Exceptions Reopened

Posted on October 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CMS has announced its intent to reopen the Meaningful Use Hardship Exceptions filing period and set the new deadline for MU hardship exceptions to November 30, 2014. With the new hardship exception extension, providers can now choose from a number of reasons why they were unable to attest in time. Here’s the details from the CMS announcement:

This reopened hardship exception application submission period is for eligible professionals and eligible hospitals that:
* Have been unable to fully implement 2014 Edition CEHRT due to delays in 2014 Edition
CEHRT availability; AND
* Eligible professionals who were unable to attest by October 1, 2014 and eligible hospitals that were unable to attest by July 1, 2014 using the flexibility options provided in the CMS 2014 CEHRT Flexibility Rule.

These are the only circumstances that will be considered for this reopened hardship exception
application submission period.

This is a big move since the meaningful use hardship exceptions deadline for hospitals was April 1, 2014 and July 1, 2014 for eligible professionals. I imagine there are many organizations that will benefit from this extension. Although, there are probably quite a few organizations that wish they’d known about this exception before now or that think the exceptions are too narrow (ie. they can’t benefit from them).

What are your thoughts on this extension?

5 Ways Patient Engagement Can Benefit Your Bottom Line

Posted on October 7, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Barry Haitoff, CEO of Medical Management Corporation of America.
Barry Haitoff

Patient engagement is a popular topic with policy makers and patient advocates. They see the obvious benefits of an involved patient helping to improve their own health and eventually lower costs. Unfortunately, most doctors just see patient engagement as unreimbursed work. The majority of them can see the healthcare benefit of engaging the patient, but they have a much harder time seeing the financial benefits to them for doing so.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the ways engaging your patient can benefit your bottom line:

Meaningful Use Requirements – This was the easy one. Meaningful Use stage 2 requires an organization to engage with at least 5% of their patient population. This is how serious the government is about patient engagement. The 5% requirement means that the $44k-$65k in EHR incentive money is tied to your ability to engage with patients. For those who aren’t interested in the EHR incentive money, you’ll still be subject to the 1-5% EHR Medicare penalties that are quickly approaching (start in 2015).

Get Paid – I’m sure that many doctors don’t think of this as patient engagement, but it’s a very important part of your engagement with the patient. There’s a growing trend towards high deductible plans where the patient is shouldering more of the financial burden for their care. Finding multiple ways where you can engage with the patient and collect their portion of the bill is going to become increasingly important. Many new patients don’t even check their snail mail regularly. This means you’re going to have to find new electronic methods for collecting payments (ie. engaging the patient electronically). We’ve seen significant success with the implementation of automated calls (IVR) and patient payment portals.

Drive New Patient Referrals – In some areas of the country this isn’t an issue, but many doctors live in an area where attracting patients is highly competitive. Since the start of medicine, one of the best ways to get new patients is through patient referrals. Providing great customer service is a fantastic way to increase the number of patient referrals you receive. (yes, patients are a type of customer). Superior patient engagement is one way to demonstrate great customer service. In fact, I believe many patients will start choosing their doctor based on the quality of engagement they get as patients.

Engage Pre-patients – How do you convert a visitor to your website into a patient? The simple answer is that you engage with them on your website (Side Note: your phone number on your website is not engagement). Many practices are afraid of engaging with patients on their website because they think that patients are trying to get a free consult without having to come into the practice. From my experience, this is a minor issue and is far surpassed by the number of new patients you can find on your website. When you engage the visitors to your website, you turn those who were on the fence about scheduling an appointment into actual appointments. Plus, much of this engagement can be done by your office staff. Think of it like a virtual telephone and answering machine for your office.

Increase Adherence – Many of you might be asking how increased patient adherence can benefit a practice’s bottom line. Let’s go back to the patient referral comments above. The best way to ensure someone provides your name as a referral to their friend is for you to help a patient get better. Ensuring adherence and health improvement is the ultimate customer service and a great way to create a true patient ambassador for your office.

ACOs and Value Based Reimbursement – While we’re still currently living in the fee for service world of healthcare, the powers that be are pushing towards value based reimbursement and Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). As part of this shift, your reimbursement will be tied to how effectively and efficiently you care for your patient population. Engaging the patient in ways that are efficient and improve the quality of care you provide are going to be the bedrock of these initiatives. If you do not engage the patient in a thoughtful way, your future reimbursement will be dramatically less than you’re receiving today.

These are a few examples of why it pays to spend some time and effort engaging with the patient. I’m sure that many of you could add to the list in the comments. What value have you seen in your office from increasing your engagement with patients?

Medical Management Corporation of America, a leading provider of medical billing services, is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

Patient Education, Records vs People, CareFusion Bought, and HIT Startup Story – Twitter Roundup

Posted on October 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Every once in a while I like to take a tour around Twitter and share some of the interesting tweets I’ve found. Plus, I usually provide a little bit of commentary on each. Here are a few that interested me today.


Quite the imagery indeed. I’ve been fascinated with images lately. You can consume them in a few seconds and it communicates something so quickly.


Lawrence Weed, MD was way ahead of his time. The EHR can easily make us forget about the person if we’re not careful. Reimbursement and MU checkoff lists don’t help either.


Not a bad day to be at CareFusion. Bought by BD for $12.2 Billion. It is interesting that Cardinal Health created it, spun it off and then its competitor bought it. A little too inside baseball for me.


This article is a great read if you’re a health IT startup company. I love Jeff’s description of the black box of healthcare. It’s true that if you try to have them come out of the box and do something different, it’s extremely hard. If you do something that feeds the black box, then they’ll buy it. Sad, but true.

Fun Friday Video from ZDoggMD

Posted on October 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The famously funnier than placebo and CEO of Turntable Health, ZDoggMD, has put out a great new healthcare parody video to Garth Brooks, Friends in Low Places. The video is called “Friends with Low Platelets.”

Turns out, I just discovered that ZDoggMD and I will be sharing the same stage at the Modernizing Medicine EHR user conference, EMA Nation, as part of my Fall Health IT conference schedule. I’ll let ZDoggMD go for the funny talk and I’ll take a more emotional storytelling approach. Should make for a great event.

Side Note: It’s great that Las Vegas is finally being recognized for it’s amazing Healthcare thought leaders (ZDoggMD and myself are both in Las Vegas). Ok, Las Vegas isn’t a hub for healthcare. We’re definitely punching above our weight class, but there’s something to say about Las Vegas doing interesting things in healthcare and health IT.

Confusing HIPAA Compliance With Security

Posted on October 2, 2014 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Most people  who read this publication know that while HIPAA compliance is necessary, it’s not sufficient to protect your data. Too many healthcare leaders, especially in hospitals, seem satisfied with the song and dance their cloud vendor gave them, or the business associate that promises on a stack of Bibles that it’s in compliance.

I was reminded of this just the other day when Reuters came out with some shocking statistics. One particularly discomforting stat it reported was the fact that medical data is now worth 10 times more than your credit card number on the black market (even if John has argued otherwise). Why? Well, among other things, because medical identity theft isn’t tracked well by providers and payers, which means that a stolen identity can last for months or years before it’s closed down.

Healthcare is not only lagging behind other industries in terms of its hardware and software infrastructure, but the extent to which its executives give a care as to how exposed they are to a breach. Security experts note that senior executives in hospitals see security as a tactical, not a strategic problem, and they don’t spend much time or money on it.

But this could be a deadly mistake. As Jeff Horne, vice president at cybersecurity firm Accuvant, noted to Reuters, “healthcare providers and hospitals are just some of the easiest networks to break into. When I’ve looked at hospitals, and when I’ve talked to other people inside of a breach, they are using very old legacy systems – Windows systems that are 10+ years old that have not seen a patch.”

As if that wasn’t enough, it’s been increasingly demonstrated that medical devices — from infusion pumps to MRIs — are also frighteningly vulnerable to cyber attacks. The vulnerabilities might not be found for months, and when they are, the hapless provider has to wait for the vendor to do the patching to stay in FDA compliance.

So far, even the biggest HIPAA breaches — notably the 4.5 million patient records stolen from hospital giant Community Health Systems — don’t seem to have generated much change. But the sad truth is that unless hospitals get their act together, focused senior executive attention on the issue, and spend enough money to fix the many vulnerabilities that exist, we’re likely to be at the forefront of a very ugly time indeed.

How Secure Are Wearables?

Posted on October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

JaneenB asks a really fantastic question in this tweet. Making sure that wearables are secure is going to be a really hot topic. Yesterday, I was talking with Mac McMillan from Cynergistek and he suggested that the FDA was ready to make medical device security a priority. I’ll be interested to see what the FDA does to try and regulate security in medical devices, but you can see why this is an important thing. Mac also commented that while it’s incredibly damaging for someone to hack a pacemaker like the one Vice President Cheney had (has?), the bigger threat is the 300 pumps that are installed in a hospital. If one of them can be hacked, they all can be hacked and the process for updating them is not simple.

Of course, Mac was talking about medical device security from more of an enterprise perspective. Now, let’s think about this across millions of wearable devices that are used by consumers. Plus, many of these consumer wearable devices don’t require FDA clearance and so the FDA won’t be able to impose more security restrictions on them.

I’m not really sure the answer to this problem of wearable security. Although, I think two steps in the right direction could be for health wearable companies to first build a culture of security into their company and their product. This will add a little bit of expense on the front end, but it will more than pay off on the back end when they avoid security issues which could literally leave the company in financial ruins. Second, we could use some organization to take on the effort of reporting on the security (or lack thereof) of these devices. I’m not sure if this is a consumer reports type organization or a media company. However, I think the idea of someone holding organizations accountable is important.

We’re definitely heading towards a world of many connected devices. I don’t think we have a clear picture of what this means from a security perspective.

A Few Thoughts After AHIMA About the HIM Profession

Posted on September 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This year was my 4th year attending the AHIMA Convention. There was definitely a different vibe this year at AHIMA than has been at previous AHIMA Annual Convention. I still saw the humble and wonderful people that work in the HIM field. I also still saw a passion for the HIM work from many as well. However, there seemed to be an overall feeling from many that they were evaluating the future of HIM and what it means for healthcare, for their organization, and for them personally.

This shouldn’t really come as a surprise. Think about the evolution that’s been happening in the HIM world. First, they got broadsided by $36 billion of stimulus money that slapped EHR systems in their organizations which questioned HIM’s role in this new digital world. Then, last year they got smashed by a few lines in a bill which delayed ICD-10 another year. It’s fair to say that it’s been a tumultuous few years for the HIM profession as they consider their place in the healthcare ecosystem.

While a little bit battered and scarred, at AHIMA I still saw the same passion and love for the work these HIM professionals do. I might add, a work they do with very little recognition outside of places like AHIMA. In fact, when EHR systems started being put in place, I think that many organizations wondered if they’d need their HIM staff in the future. A number of years into the world of EHRs, I think it’s become abundantly clear in every organization that the HIM staff still have extremely important roles in an organization.

While EHR software has certainly changed the nature of the work an HIM professional does, there is still plenty of work that needs to be done. We’d all love for the EHR to automate our entire healthcare lives, but it’s just not going to happen. In fact, in many ways, EHR software complicates the work that’s done by HIM staff. Remember that great HIM modules, features, and functions don’t sell more EHR software (more on that in future posts). Sadly, the HIM functions are often an afterthought in EHR development. We’ll see if that catches up with the EHR vendors.

As I’ve dived deeper into the life and work of an HIM professional, I’ve seen how difficult and detailed the job really can be. Not to mention, the negative consequences an organization can experience if they don’t have their HIM house in order. Just think about a few of the top functions: Release of Information, Medical Coding, Security and Compliance. All of these can have a tremendous impact for good or bad on an organization.

What is clear to me is that the HIM professional has moved well beyond managing medical records. If done well, the HIM functions can play a really important part in any healthcare organization. The challenge that many HIM professionals face is adapting to this changing environment. I see a number of real stand out professionals that are doing phenomenal things in their organization and really have an important voice. However, I still see far too many who aren’t adapting and many who quite frankly don’t want to adapt. I think this will come back to bite them in the end.

A Little #AHIMACon14 Twitter Roundup

Posted on September 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m in San Diego today at the AHIMA Annual Convention. It’s a great event that brings together some really passionate and wonderful Health Information Management professionals. There’s been some interesting Twitter activity at the event. Here’s a roundup of some of the interesting tweets:

Some really great insights. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the tweets above.