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eClinicalWorks Settlement Hasn’t Led To Customer Defections, Yet

Posted on August 7, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Loyalty is a funny thing. You’d think that when a vendor let you down spectacularly, you wouldn’t do business with them anymore. But the truth is, when it comes to health IT it’s not that simple. In many cases, vendor-customer relationships are more like marriages than formal agreements. Even if things start to go south, customers have so much invested in their vendor relationship that backing out may not seem like a realistic possibility.

Yes, I’m pontificating here, but not without a point. What I’m responding to here is a recent KLAS survey which found that while many customers of the now-tarnished eClinicalWorks have lost confidence in the company, many are still on board for now.

As many readers will know, in May eCW settled a whistleblower suit against the company for $155 million. The suit, which was brought by the US Department of Justice, asserted that the vendor got certified for incentive payments by putting deceptive kludges in place.

After agreeing to pay a massive penalty to the feds and putting a “Coprrporate Integrity Agreement” in place, it’s little wonder that some customers don’t trust eCW anymore. But the reality of the situation is that they’re not exactly free to jump ship either.

The study, which was reported on in HIT Consultant, found that 66% of customers polled by KLAS said their perception of eCW had moderately or significantly worsened after the settlement. Meanwhile, 34% of current eCW customers plan to look elsewhere when they make their next health IT investment.

Another third of respondents said they felt stuck in their current eCW contract, though they would consider switching vendors when the contract expires or they have more resources to invest. Still, only 4% of KLAS respondents said they were leaving specifically because of the settlement.

Meanwhile, there’s apparently a subset of eCW customers who aren’t that worried about the settlement or its implications. One-third of respondents said that it had little impact on them, and some noted that eCW is probably just the first of many vendors whose meaningful use certification will be called into question.

The reality is that while eCW customers were a bit shaken by the settlement, it didn’t exactly come as a shock that the vendor was playing it close to the edge, with one-fifth noting that the settlement was “unsurprising.”

I would tend to side with the eCW customers who predict that this settlement is the tip of the iceberg, and that it’s likely to come out that other health IT vendors were gaming the certification process. The question is whether these settlements will merely inconvenience providers or lead to serious problems of their own. If the feds ever decide that providers should have known about faked certifications, the game will get a lot more complicated.

Engagement Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on August 4, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week’s Fun Friday healthcare cartoon was shared by the Society for Participatory Medicine. If you don’t know about this organization, take a minute and go check out what they do and see how you can support them. You’ll see why they shared this cartoon.

Sadly, this is the experience of many patients with their doctors. The Society for Participatory Medicine has been working hard to change that mindset. We all need to support these efforts in our own circle of influence. It’s not about what our actions look like, but that we’re really engaged in a relationship with our patients. Doing so will have a powerful effect on everyone in healthcare.

Healthcare Blockchain Use Case

Posted on August 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There’s been a lot of talk about using blockchain in healthcare. While I don’t think that it’s the end all be all solution that many make it out to be, I do think that healthcare could benefit in a lot of ways from blockchain.

David Chou recently shared this healthcare use case for blockchain which it looks like he got from Deloitte:

I’d be interested to hear blockchain experts thoughts on this use case. Is this reasonable? Could this be reasonably achieved with blockchain? Are there risks to implementing this use case?

We all know about the major challenges associated with interoperability in healthcare. Blockchain itself doesn’t solve a lot of these interoperability problems. It can’t because most of the interoperability problems in healthcare are business problems and not technology problems. However, I wonder if we can make data sharing in healthcare so simple that it would be embarrassing not to do it. Then, we might be on to something.

Other thoughts on blockchain in healthcare? I still have a lot to learn about this new technology.

Will ACOs Face Tough Antitrust Scrutiny?

Posted on August 2, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

For some reason, I’ve always been interested in antitrust regulation, not just in the healthcare industry but across the board.

To me, there’s something fascinating about how federal agencies define markets, figure out what constitutes an unfair level of market dominance and decide which deals are out of bounds. For someone who’s not a lawyer, perhaps that’s a strange sort of geeking out to do, but there you have it.

Obviously, given how complex industry relationships are, healthcare relationships are fraught with antitrust issues to ponder. Lately, I’ve begun thinking about how antitrust regulators will look at large ACOs. And I’ve concluded that ACOs will be on the radar of the FTC and U.S. Department of Justice very soon, if they aren’t already.

On their face, ACOs try to dominate markets, so there’s plenty of potential for them to tip the scales too far in their favor for regulators to ignore. Their business model involves both vertical and horizontal integration, either of which could be seen as giving participants too much power.

Please take the following as a guide from an amateur who follows antitrust issues. Again, IANAL, but my understanding is as follows:

  • Vertical integration in healthcare glues together related entities that serve each other directly, such as health plans, hospitals, physician groups and skilled nursing facilities.
  • Horizontal integration connects mutually interested service providers, including competitors such as rival hospitals.

Even without being a legal whiz, it’s easy to understand why either of these ACO models might lead to (what the feds would see as) a machine that squeezes out uninvolved parties. The fact that these providers may share a single EMR could makes matters worse, as it makes the case that the parties can hoard data which binds patients to their network.

Regardless, it just makes sense that if a health plan builds an ACO network, cherry picking what it sees as the best providers, it’s unlikely that excluded providers will enjoy the same reimbursement health plan partners get. The excluded parties just won’t have as much clout.

Yes, it’s already the case that bigger providers may get either higher reimbursement or higher patient volume from insurers, but ACO business models could intensify the problem.

Meanwhile, if a bunch of competing hospitals or physician practices in a market decide to work together, it seems pretty unlikely that others could enter the market, expand their business or develop new service lines that compete with the ACO. Eventually, many patients would be forced to work with ACO providers. Their health plan will only pay for this market-dominant conglomerate.

Of course, these issues are probably being kicked around in legal circles. I’m equally confident that the ACOs, which can afford high-ticket legal advice, have looked at these concerns as well. But to my knowledge these questions aren’t popping up in the trade press, which suggests to me that they’re not a hot topic in non-legal circles.

Please note that I’m not taking a position here on whether antitrust regulation is fair or appropriate here. I’m just pointing out that if you’re part of an ACO, you may be more vulnerable to antitrust suits than you thought. Any entity which has the power to crush competition and set prices is a potential target.

Inching Toward Health IT Interoperability – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/4 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Alan Portela (@AlanWPortela) from Airstrip on the topic of “Inching Toward Health IT Interoperability.”

To some it may seem as though ‘interoperability’ is a stale health IT buzzword, but nothing could be further from the truth. Why? Because interoperability still isn’t a reality.

Data is digital, but not readily available; data exists in EHRs, but isn’t aggregated and shared in a way that makes sense for clinicians. In addition, precision medicine relies upon the ability to collect real time data from medical devices at the moment of care – physiologic phenotypes, genomic data, and the like. Precision medicine fundamentally depends on data to make unique diagnosis/care plans for individuals or populations. That cannot happen easily or effectively without interoperability.

Health IT could play a significant role in addressing more serious health issues, but a lack of interoperability and access holds us back. If we want precision medicine, then we need to recognize that interoperability is a must.

Questions we will explore in this week’s #HITsm chat include:
T1: Where have you seen the most success in health IT interoperability? #HITsm

T2: What have been your largest barriers to health IT interoperability? #HITsm

T3: What is vital to making health IT interoperability a reality? #HITsm

T4: Which industry stakeholder has the biggest responsibility to push health IT interoperability forward? #HITsm

T5: How should governing bodies – national and/or industry specific – support health IT interoperability? #HITsm

Bonus: How can we, as health IT leaders and innovators, drive the change the industry needs? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/11 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

8/18 – Diversity in HIT
Hosted by Jeanmarie Loria (@JeanmarieLoria) from @advizehealth

8/25 – Consumer Data Liquidity – The Road So Far, The Road Ahead
Hosted by Greg Meyer (@Greg_Meyer93)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

A Hospital CIO Perspective on Precision Medicine

Posted on July 31, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

#Paid content sponsored by Intel.

In this video interview, I talk with David Chou, Vice President, Chief Information and Digital Officer with Kansas City, Missouri-based Children’s Mercy Hospital. In addition to his work at Children’s Mercy, he helps healthcare organizations transform themselves into digital enterprises.

Chou previously served as a healthcare technology advisor with law firm Balch & Bingham and Chief Information Officer with the University of Mississippi Medical Center. He also worked with the Cleveland Clinic to build a flagship hospital in Abu Dhabi, as well as working in for-profit healthcare organizations in California.

Precision Medicine and Genomic Medicine are important topics for every hospital CIO to understand. In my interview with David Chou, he provides the hospital CIO perspective on these topics and offers insights into what a hospital organization should be doing to take part in and be prepared for precision medicine and genomic medicine.

Here are the questions I asked him, if you’d like to skip to a specific topic in the video or check out the full video interview embedded below:

What are you doing in your organization when it comes to precision medicine and genomic medicine?

Our Final 2017 #HIT100 List

Posted on July 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Much like social media, the #HIT100 is never without a few challenges, but I’m also happy to say that this year’s #HIT100 exhibited an extreme amount of gratitude and appreciation from and for thousands of people in the healthcare social media community.

I’m impressed by the number of people participating in the #HIT100. Symplur calculated that the #HIT100 hashtag generated 42 million impressions across 6195 tweets and 1852 participants (some just used the hashtag for discussion and not a nomination). Those are impressive numbers.

As I mentioned, I don’t intend to publish a ranked list of the #HIT100 as has been done in past years since I think ranking on the #HIT100 can be easily gamed and therefore ranking on the list has little meaning. However, I think a list of 100 social media accounts that many in the community recognize as valuable is something worth sharing. It’s a great way to discover new accounts, be reminded of accounts you haven’t seen in a while, and find new sources of information and insights into the industry. This year we had quite a few people I’d never seen before and what seems like a larger international group than previous years.

I’d hoped to find a way to publish the final 2017 #HIT100 list where it would list the top 100 accounts in random order that changed on every refresh. Unfortunately, I didn’t have the time available to really flesh this out. So, I’ve resorted to publishing the #HIT100 list in reverse ABC order (because the A’s always get first and so why not the Z’s this time?).

Over time I hope to publish other interesting insights and charts from the nominations including popular hashtags, other engagement stats, those only nominated by one person to the #HIT100, those who weren’t on previous #HIT100 lists, etc. For now, take a minute and browse through this impressive list of people who largely care about using technology to improve healthcare.

Finally, a big thank you to Joe Warbington (@JWarbington) from Qlik for providing a pretty amazing tool for me to analyze all the #HIT100 nominations and Dennis Dailey (@_hitshow) who suggested I work with them. I’d seen Qlik work on EHR data, but I didn’t realize it could so easily collect and analyze Twitter data as well. Thanks to them for providing the tool I could use to analyze all the nominations.

Data Disclaimer: We made an effort to ensure the data was as accurate as possible for this list. However, since we see this just as a fun activity of social discovery and appreciation, we didn’t go to great lengths to ensure the accuracy and won’t be publishing the “rank” on the list. In fact, we’re sure it’s not 100% accurate. If that’s an issue for you, we welcome you to pull the data from Twitter and do your own analysis. We welcome any and all to take the nominations and use them however they may. The beauty of the #HIT100 is that it’s all available to anyone to assess, slice, dice, interpret, and use however they see fit. If people publish 20 different #HIT100 lists, great. More discovery of new and interesting people for everyone involved. The following is our quick and dirty analysis of the nominations.

#HIT100 Twitter Accounts
@womenofteal
@wareFLO
@vishnu_saxena
@VinceKuraitis
@VictorHSW
@ukpenguin
@tweettiwoo
@Tony_PharmD
@TextraHealth
@techguy
@stacygoebel
@smithhazelann
@ShimCode
@ShereesePubHlth
@SeanSaid_
@sarahbennight
@rtoleti
@Resultant
@Respond_Rescue
@ReginaHolliday
@realHayman
@RBlount
@RasuShrestha
@R1chardatron
@PointonChris
@PharmacyPodcast
@PharmacyEdge1
@PatientVoices
@pat_health
@orpyxinc
@nrip
@nmanaloto
@nickisnpdx
@natarpr
@NaomiFried
@MMaxwellStroud
@mloxton
@mikebiselli
@MichelleRKearns
@Michael81082
@MelSmithJones
@melissaxxmccool
@Matt_R_Fisher
@markwattscra
@maria_quinlan
@marcus_baw
@MandiBPro
@lynnvos
@Lygeia
@LouiseGeraghty5
@lisadbudzinski
@klrogers5
@KenRayTaylor
@JWarbington
@justaskjul
@jotaelecruz
@JoinAPPA
@JohnNosta
@JoeBabaian
@Joan_JJ_Mc
@Jim_Rawson_MD
@JennDennard
@JBBC
@jaredpiano
@janicemccallum
@JamieJay2
@jameyedwards
@jamesfreed5
@innonurse
@healthythinker
@HealthData4All
@HealthcareWen
@gnayyar
@ginaman2
@GilmerHealthLaw
@GeriLynn
@ErinLAlbert
@endocrine_witch
@EMRAnswers
@ElinSilveous
@ebukstel
@DrTylerDalton
@drstclaire
@drnic1
@drlfarrell
@DmitriWall
@dirkstanley
@dflee30
@dchou1107
@dandunlop
@CTrappe
@Colin_Hung
@CoherenceMed
@CancerGeek
@burtrosen
@BunnyEllerin
@btrfly12
@Brian_Eastwood
@Brad_Justus
@billesslinger
@BGerleman
@BFMack
@BarbyIngle
@AllanVafi
@AinemCarroll
@ahier
@2healthguru
@_FaceSA

A big thank you to everyone who participated in the #HIT100 this year. Let’s keep sharing the good and showing appreciation for the people who influence our life for good.

Past #HIT100 Lists:
2016 #HIT100
2015 #HIT100
2014 #HIT100
2013 #HIT100
2012 #HIT100
2011 #HIT100

Despite Abundance of Threats, Few Providers Take Serious Steps To Protect Their Data

Posted on July 27, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I scarcely need to remind readers of the immensity of the threats to healthcare data security out there. Not only is healthcare data an attractive target for cybercriminals, the aforementioned keep coming up with new ways to torture security pros (the particularly evil ransomware comes to mind).

Unfortunately, healthcare organizations are also notorious for spending too little on data security. Apparently, this also extends to spending money on information security governance or risk management, according to a new study.

The study is sponsored by Netwrix Corp., which sells a visibility platform for data security and risk mitigation and hybrid environments.  (In other words, the following stats are interesting, but keep your bias alert on.)

Researchers found that 95% of responding healthcare organizations don’t use software for information security governance or risk management and that just 31% of respondents said they were well prepared to address IT risks. Still, despite the prevalence of cybersecurity threats, 68% don’t have any staffers in place specifically to address them.

What’s the source of key IT healthcare security threats? Fifty-nine percent of healthcare organizations said they were struggling with malware, and 47% of providers said they’d faced security incidents caused by human error. Fifty-six percent of healthcare organizations saw employees as the biggest threat to system availability and security.

To tackle these problems, 56% of healthcare organizations said they plan to invest in security solutions to protect their data. Unfortunately, though, the majority said they lacked the budget (75%), time (75%) and senior management buy-in (44%) needed to improve their handling of such risks.

So it goes with healthcare security. Most of the industry seems willing to stash security spending needs under a rock until some major headline-grabbing incident happens. Then, it’s all with the apologies and the hand-wringing and the promise to do much better. My guess is that a good number of these organizations don’t do much to learn from their mistake, and instead throw some jerry-rigged patch in place that’s vulnerable to a new attack with new characteristics.

That being said, the study makes the important point that employees directly or indirectly cause many IT security problems. My sense is that the percent of employees actually packaging data or accessing it for malicious purposes is relatively small, but that major problems created by an “oops” are pretty common.

Perhaps the fact that employees are the source of many IT incidents is actually a hopeful trend. Even if an IT department doesn’t have the resources to invest in security experts or new technology, it can spearhead efforts to treat employees better on security issues. Virtually every employee that doesn’t specialize in IT could probably use a brush up on proper security hygiene, anyway. And retraining employees doesn’t call for a lot of funding or major C-suite buy-in.

Care Coordination Tech Still Needs Work

Posted on July 26, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Virtually all of you would agree that we’ll have to do a better job of care coordination if we hope to meet our patient outcomes goals. And logically enough, most of us are hoping that technology will help us make this happen.  But from what I’ve seen, it isn’t going to happen anytime soon.

Every now and then, I get a press release from a company that says a company’s tech has solved at least some part of the industry’s care coordination problem. Today, the company was featured in a release from Baylor College of Medicine, where a physician has launched a mobile software venture focused on preventing miscommunication between patient care team members.

The company, ConsultLink, has developed a mobile platform that manages patient handoffs, consults and care team collaboration. It was founded by Dr. Alexander Pastuszak, an assistant professor of urology at Baylor, in 2013.

As with every other digital care coordination platform I’ve heard about – and I’ve encountered at least a dozen – the ConsultLink platform seems to have some worthwhile features. I was especially interested in its analytics capability, as well as its partnership with Redox, an EMR integration firm which has gotten a lot of attention of late.

The thing is, I’ve heard all this before, in one form or another. I’m not suggesting that ConsultLink doesn’t have what it takes. However, it’s been my observation if market space attracts dozens of competitors, the very basics of how they should attack the problem are still up for grabs.

As I suspected it would, a casual Google search turned up several other interesting players, including:

  • ChartSpan Medical Technologies: The Greenville, South Carolina-based company has developed a platform which includes practice management software, mobile patient engagement and records management tools. It offers a chronic care management solution which is designed to coordinate care between all providers.
  • MyHealthDirect: Nashville’s MyHealthDirect, a relatively early entrant launched in 2006, describes itself as focusing consumer healthcare access solutions. Its version of digital care coordination includes online scheduling systems, referral management tools and event-driven analytics, which it delivers on behalf of health systems, providers and payers.
  • Spruce Health: Spruce Health, which is based in San Francisco, centralizes care communication around mobile devices. Its platform includes a shared inbox for all patient and team communication, collaborative messaging, telemedicine support and mobile payment options.

No doubt there are dozens more that aren’t as good at SEO. As these vendors compete, the template for a care coordination platform is evolving moment by moment. As with other tech niches, companies are jumping into the fray with technology perhaps designed for other purposes. Others are hoping to set a new standard for how care coordination platforms work. There’s nothing wrong with that, but its likely to keep the core feature set for digital coordination fluid for quite some time.

I don’t doubt among the companies I’ve described, there’s a lot of good and useful ideas. But to me, the fact that so many players are trying to define the concept of digital care coordination suggests that it has some growing up to do.

How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction & Provider Switching? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on July 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 7/28 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Lea Chatham (@leachatham) from @SolutionReach on the topic of “How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction & Provider Switching?.”

A new patient survey conducted by Solutionreach, looked at patient satisfaction, practice selection, practice switching, and communication preferences across three generations–baby boomers, Generation X, and millennials–and four practice types–primary care, dental, dermatology, and eye care.

Not surprisingly there were some striking differences between the generations. For example, baby boomers are much more satisfied with their providers than the other two generations. However, there were also some unexpected consistencies like a desire for more email and text communication across all generations.

The survey found that across all generations and all types of practices there is a significant amount of practice switching going on, probably more than ever before. In this #HITsm chat we’ll look at some of the data and what a few of the surprises were as well as some of the things providers should be thinking about if they want to retain and recruit patients in the different generations.

For more information on the Solution Reach survey mentioned above, check out their paper, news release, and these two blog posts.

Questions we will explore in this week’s #HITsm chat include:
T1: Baby boomers appear to be more satisfied with providers than other generations, what might be contributing to this? #HITsm

T2: Why are millennials and Gen Xers so much less satisfied with providers? #HITsm

T3: What are some of the key areas of low satisfaction across practices/generations? How do we fix it? #HITsm

T4: New data suggest liking your doctor isn’t enough anymore. What does it take to keep patients today? #HITsm

T5: Should practices start taking age into account for retention/recruitment of patients? How? #HITsm

Bonus: Should doctors be using tools like texting in day-to-day practice? Where and when? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/4 – Health IT Interoperability
Hosted by Alan Portela (@AlanWPortela) from Airstrip

8/11 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

8/18 – Diversity in HIT
Hosted by Jeanmarie Loria (@JeanmarieLoria) from @advizehealth

8/25 – TBD
Hosted by Greg Meyer (@Greg_Meyer93)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.