Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

5 Ways Patient Engagement Can Benefit Your Bottom Line

Posted on October 7, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Barry Haitoff, CEO of Medical Management Corporation of America.
Barry Haitoff

Patient engagement is a popular topic with policy makers and patient advocates. They see the obvious benefits of an involved patient helping to improve their own health and eventually lower costs. Unfortunately, most doctors just see patient engagement as unreimbursed work. The majority of them can see the healthcare benefit of engaging the patient, but they have a much harder time seeing the financial benefits to them for doing so.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the ways engaging your patient can benefit your bottom line:

Meaningful Use Requirements – This was the easy one. Meaningful Use stage 2 requires an organization to engage with at least 5% of their patient population. This is how serious the government is about patient engagement. The 5% requirement means that the $44k-$65k in EHR incentive money is tied to your ability to engage with patients. For those who aren’t interested in the EHR incentive money, you’ll still be subject to the 1-5% EHR Medicare penalties that are quickly approaching (start in 2015).

Get Paid – I’m sure that many doctors don’t think of this as patient engagement, but it’s a very important part of your engagement with the patient. There’s a growing trend towards high deductible plans where the patient is shouldering more of the financial burden for their care. Finding multiple ways where you can engage with the patient and collect their portion of the bill is going to become increasingly important. Many new patients don’t even check their snail mail regularly. This means you’re going to have to find new electronic methods for collecting payments (ie. engaging the patient electronically). We’ve seen significant success with the implementation of automated calls (IVR) and patient payment portals.

Drive New Patient Referrals – In some areas of the country this isn’t an issue, but many doctors live in an area where attracting patients is highly competitive. Since the start of medicine, one of the best ways to get new patients is through patient referrals. Providing great customer service is a fantastic way to increase the number of patient referrals you receive. (yes, patients are a type of customer). Superior patient engagement is one way to demonstrate great customer service. In fact, I believe many patients will start choosing their doctor based on the quality of engagement they get as patients.

Engage Pre-patients – How do you convert a visitor to your website into a patient? The simple answer is that you engage with them on your website (Side Note: your phone number on your website is not engagement). Many practices are afraid of engaging with patients on their website because they think that patients are trying to get a free consult without having to come into the practice. From my experience, this is a minor issue and is far surpassed by the number of new patients you can find on your website. When you engage the visitors to your website, you turn those who were on the fence about scheduling an appointment into actual appointments. Plus, much of this engagement can be done by your office staff. Think of it like a virtual telephone and answering machine for your office.

Increase Adherence – Many of you might be asking how increased patient adherence can benefit a practice’s bottom line. Let’s go back to the patient referral comments above. The best way to ensure someone provides your name as a referral to their friend is for you to help a patient get better. Ensuring adherence and health improvement is the ultimate customer service and a great way to create a true patient ambassador for your office.

ACOs and Value Based Reimbursement – While we’re still currently living in the fee for service world of healthcare, the powers that be are pushing towards value based reimbursement and Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). As part of this shift, your reimbursement will be tied to how effectively and efficiently you care for your patient population. Engaging the patient in ways that are efficient and improve the quality of care you provide are going to be the bedrock of these initiatives. If you do not engage the patient in a thoughtful way, your future reimbursement will be dramatically less than you’re receiving today.

These are a few examples of why it pays to spend some time and effort engaging with the patient. I’m sure that many of you could add to the list in the comments. What value have you seen in your office from increasing your engagement with patients?

Medical Management Corporation of America, a leading provider of medical billing services, is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

Patient Education, Records vs People, CareFusion Bought, and HIT Startup Story – Twitter Roundup

Posted on October 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Every once in a while I like to take a tour around Twitter and share some of the interesting tweets I’ve found. Plus, I usually provide a little bit of commentary on each. Here are a few that interested me today.


Quite the imagery indeed. I’ve been fascinated with images lately. You can consume them in a few seconds and it communicates something so quickly.


Lawrence Weed, MD was way ahead of his time. The EHR can easily make us forget about the person if we’re not careful. Reimbursement and MU checkoff lists don’t help either.


Not a bad day to be at CareFusion. Bought by BD for $12.2 Billion. It is interesting that Cardinal Health created it, spun it off and then its competitor bought it. A little too inside baseball for me.


This article is a great read if you’re a health IT startup company. I love Jeff’s description of the black box of healthcare. It’s true that if you try to have them come out of the box and do something different, it’s extremely hard. If you do something that feeds the black box, then they’ll buy it. Sad, but true.

Fun Friday Video from ZDoggMD

Posted on October 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The famously funnier than placebo and CEO of Turntable Health, ZDoggMD, has put out a great new healthcare parody video to Garth Brooks, Friends in Low Places. The video is called “Friends with Low Platelets.”

Turns out, I just discovered that ZDoggMD and I will be sharing the same stage at the Modernizing Medicine EHR user conference, EMA Nation, as part of my Fall Health IT conference schedule. I’ll let ZDoggMD go for the funny talk and I’ll take a more emotional storytelling approach. Should make for a great event.

Side Note: It’s great that Las Vegas is finally being recognized for it’s amazing Healthcare thought leaders (ZDoggMD and myself are both in Las Vegas). Ok, Las Vegas isn’t a hub for healthcare. We’re definitely punching above our weight class, but there’s something to say about Las Vegas doing interesting things in healthcare and health IT.

Confusing HIPAA Compliance With Security

Posted on October 2, 2014 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Most people  who read this publication know that while HIPAA compliance is necessary, it’s not sufficient to protect your data. Too many healthcare leaders, especially in hospitals, seem satisfied with the song and dance their cloud vendor gave them, or the business associate that promises on a stack of Bibles that it’s in compliance.

I was reminded of this just the other day when Reuters came out with some shocking statistics. One particularly discomforting stat it reported was the fact that medical data is now worth 10 times more than your credit card number on the black market (even if John has argued otherwise). Why? Well, among other things, because medical identity theft isn’t tracked well by providers and payers, which means that a stolen identity can last for months or years before it’s closed down.

Healthcare is not only lagging behind other industries in terms of its hardware and software infrastructure, but the extent to which its executives give a care as to how exposed they are to a breach. Security experts note that senior executives in hospitals see security as a tactical, not a strategic problem, and they don’t spend much time or money on it.

But this could be a deadly mistake. As Jeff Horne, vice president at cybersecurity firm Accuvant, noted to Reuters, “healthcare providers and hospitals are just some of the easiest networks to break into. When I’ve looked at hospitals, and when I’ve talked to other people inside of a breach, they are using very old legacy systems – Windows systems that are 10+ years old that have not seen a patch.”

As if that wasn’t enough, it’s been increasingly demonstrated that medical devices — from infusion pumps to MRIs — are also frighteningly vulnerable to cyber attacks. The vulnerabilities might not be found for months, and when they are, the hapless provider has to wait for the vendor to do the patching to stay in FDA compliance.

So far, even the biggest HIPAA breaches — notably the 4.5 million patient records stolen from hospital giant Community Health Systems — don’t seem to have generated much change. But the sad truth is that unless hospitals get their act together, focused senior executive attention on the issue, and spend enough money to fix the many vulnerabilities that exist, we’re likely to be at the forefront of a very ugly time indeed.

How Secure Are Wearables?

Posted on October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

JaneenB asks a really fantastic question in this tweet. Making sure that wearables are secure is going to be a really hot topic. Yesterday, I was talking with Mac McMillan from Cynergistek and he suggested that the FDA was ready to make medical device security a priority. I’ll be interested to see what the FDA does to try and regulate security in medical devices, but you can see why this is an important thing. Mac also commented that while it’s incredibly damaging for someone to hack a pacemaker like the one Vice President Cheney had (has?), the bigger threat is the 300 pumps that are installed in a hospital. If one of them can be hacked, they all can be hacked and the process for updating them is not simple.

Of course, Mac was talking about medical device security from more of an enterprise perspective. Now, let’s think about this across millions of wearable devices that are used by consumers. Plus, many of these consumer wearable devices don’t require FDA clearance and so the FDA won’t be able to impose more security restrictions on them.

I’m not really sure the answer to this problem of wearable security. Although, I think two steps in the right direction could be for health wearable companies to first build a culture of security into their company and their product. This will add a little bit of expense on the front end, but it will more than pay off on the back end when they avoid security issues which could literally leave the company in financial ruins. Second, we could use some organization to take on the effort of reporting on the security (or lack thereof) of these devices. I’m not sure if this is a consumer reports type organization or a media company. However, I think the idea of someone holding organizations accountable is important.

We’re definitely heading towards a world of many connected devices. I don’t think we have a clear picture of what this means from a security perspective.

A Few Thoughts After AHIMA About the HIM Profession

Posted on September 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This year was my 4th year attending the AHIMA Convention. There was definitely a different vibe this year at AHIMA than has been at previous AHIMA Annual Convention. I still saw the humble and wonderful people that work in the HIM field. I also still saw a passion for the HIM work from many as well. However, there seemed to be an overall feeling from many that they were evaluating the future of HIM and what it means for healthcare, for their organization, and for them personally.

This shouldn’t really come as a surprise. Think about the evolution that’s been happening in the HIM world. First, they got broadsided by $36 billion of stimulus money that slapped EHR systems in their organizations which questioned HIM’s role in this new digital world. Then, last year they got smashed by a few lines in a bill which delayed ICD-10 another year. It’s fair to say that it’s been a tumultuous few years for the HIM profession as they consider their place in the healthcare ecosystem.

While a little bit battered and scarred, at AHIMA I still saw the same passion and love for the work these HIM professionals do. I might add, a work they do with very little recognition outside of places like AHIMA. In fact, when EHR systems started being put in place, I think that many organizations wondered if they’d need their HIM staff in the future. A number of years into the world of EHRs, I think it’s become abundantly clear in every organization that the HIM staff still have extremely important roles in an organization.

While EHR software has certainly changed the nature of the work an HIM professional does, there is still plenty of work that needs to be done. We’d all love for the EHR to automate our entire healthcare lives, but it’s just not going to happen. In fact, in many ways, EHR software complicates the work that’s done by HIM staff. Remember that great HIM modules, features, and functions don’t sell more EHR software (more on that in future posts). Sadly, the HIM functions are often an afterthought in EHR development. We’ll see if that catches up with the EHR vendors.

As I’ve dived deeper into the life and work of an HIM professional, I’ve seen how difficult and detailed the job really can be. Not to mention, the negative consequences an organization can experience if they don’t have their HIM house in order. Just think about a few of the top functions: Release of Information, Medical Coding, Security and Compliance. All of these can have a tremendous impact for good or bad on an organization.

What is clear to me is that the HIM professional has moved well beyond managing medical records. If done well, the HIM functions can play a really important part in any healthcare organization. The challenge that many HIM professionals face is adapting to this changing environment. I see a number of real stand out professionals that are doing phenomenal things in their organization and really have an important voice. However, I still see far too many who aren’t adapting and many who quite frankly don’t want to adapt. I think this will come back to bite them in the end.

A Little #AHIMACon14 Twitter Roundup

Posted on September 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m in San Diego today at the AHIMA Annual Convention. It’s a great event that brings together some really passionate and wonderful Health Information Management professionals. There’s been some interesting Twitter activity at the event. Here’s a roundup of some of the interesting tweets:

Some really great insights. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the tweets above.

The Future of Healthcare IT Publishing

Posted on September 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During today’s #HITsm chat, Karen DeSalvo joined the chat and asked what healthcare IT will be like in 2024. Brian Eastwood, Senior Editor at CIO.com, tweeted the following:


The topic was of interest to me as a health IT blogger myself. However, this was my response:


This of course led to Brian and I contributing to a series of possible 2024 Health IT Headlines we have to look forward to:

I’m pretty sure this wasn’t what Karen DeSalvo had in mind when she asked the question, but I thought it was fun to think about these possible headlines. Plus, I think there’s a fair amount we can learn from thinking about the future in this type of headline fashion. What do you think the healthcare IT headlines will say in 2024?

The Medication List Said, “Raised toilet seat daily”

Posted on September 25, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Pike, CEO of Versio.
???????????????????????????????
With over a third of healthcare organizations switching to a new EHR in 2014, there is a lot of data movement going on. With the vast amount of effort it took to create that data, it’s a valuable asset to the organization. It can mean life or death; it can keep a hospital out of the courtroom; and it can mean the difference between a smooth-running organization and an operational nightmare.

But when that important data needs to be converted and moved to a new EHR, you realize just how complex it really is.

During a recent conversion of legacy data over to a new EHR, we came across this entry in the Medication List:  Raised toilet seat, daily.

Uh, come again??

How about this one?  “Dignity Plus XXL [adult diapers]; take one by mouth daily.”  What does the patient have, potty mouth?

Now, while we may snicker at the visual, it’s really no joke. These are actual entries encountered in source systems during clinical data migration projects. Some entries are comical; some are just odd; and some are downright frightening. But all of them are a conversion nightmare when you are migrating data.

Patient clinical data is unlike any other kind of data, for many reasons. It’s massive. It requires near-perfect accuracy. It’s also extremely complex, especially when you are not just migrating, but also converting from one system “language” to another.

Automated conversion is a common choice for healthcare organizations when moving data from legacy systems to newly adopted EHRs. It can be a great choice for some of the data, but not all. If your source says “hypertension, uncontrolled,” but your target system only has “uncontrolled hypertension,” that’s a simple enough inconsistency to overcome, but how would you predict every non-standard or incorrect entry you will encounter?

Here are some more actual examples. If you’re considering automated conversion, consider how your software would tangle up over these:

SOURCE SYSTEM SAYS COMMENTS
346.71D  Chm gr wo ara w nt wo st ???
levothyroxine 100 mg Should be mcg. Yikes!
Proventil Target system has 20 choices
NKDA (vomiting) NKDA= no known drug allergies.
Having no allergies causes vomiting?
Massage Therapy, take one by mouth twice weekly ???
Tylenol suppositories; take 1 by mouth daily Maybe not life-threatening, but certainly unpleasant
PMD
(Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease)
Should have been PMDD
(premenstrual dysphoric disorder)
Allergy:  Reglan 5 mg Is patient allergic only to that dosage, or should this have been in the med list?
Confusing allergies and meds can be deadly.
Height 60 Centimeters or inches? Convert carefully!

 

These just scratch the surface of the myriad complexities, entry errors, and inconsistencies that exist in medical records across the industry. No matter how diligent your staff is, I guarantee your charts contain entries like these!

When an automated conversion program encounters data it can’t convert, it falls out as an “exception.” If the exception can’t be resolved, the data is simply left behind. Even with admirable effort, almost no one in the industry can capture more than 80% of the data. Some report as low as 50%.

How safe would you feel if your doctor didn’t know about 20% of your allergies? What if one of those left behind was the one that could kill you? What if a medication left behind was one you absolutely shouldn’t take with a new medication your doctor prescribed? Consider the woman whose aneurysm history was omitted during a conversion to a new EHR, so her specialist was unaware of it. She later died during a procedure when her aneurysm burst. I would say her family considered that data left behind pretty important, as did the treating physician, who could be found liable.

Liable, you say?

That’s right. The specialist could be found liable for the information in the legacy record because it was available….even if it was archived in an old EHR or paper chart.

You can begin to see the enormity of the problem and the potentially dangerous ramifications. Certainly every patient deserves an accurate record, and healthcare providers’ effectiveness, if not their very livelihood, depends on it. But maintaining the integrity of the data, especially during an EHR conversion, is no trivial task. Unfortunately, too many healthcare organizations underestimate it, and clearly it deserves more attention.

There is good news, however. With a well-planned conversion, using a system that combines robust technology with human expertise, it is possible to achieve 100% data capture with 99.8% accuracy. We’ve done it with well over a million patient chartsIt isn’t easy, but the results are worth it. Patients and doctors deserve no less.

Lisa Pike is the CEO of Versio, a healthcare technology company specializing in legacy data migration, with a proven track record of 100% data capture and 99.8% quality. We call it “No Data Left Behind.” For more information on Versio’s services or to schedule an introductory conversation, please visit us at www.MyVersio.com or email sales@myversio.com.

Outsourcing Claim Creation Infographic

Posted on September 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You know I’m a sucker for an infographic. You can see my Health IT Infographic collection on Pinterest. I found the following infographic interesting since I’d describe it more as a sales infographic. It makes the case for outsourcing claim creation. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the infographic or on outsourcing claim creation. What do you think?

Outsourcing Claim Creation Infographic

Full Disclosure: ClinicSpectrum is a sponsor of the “Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series” on this site, but this post is not a sponsored post.