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Uptown Funk Parody by Med Students at WashU Medical Students

Posted on August 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday! Time for a little fun Friday video to start your weekend off right. This great parody video from WashU Medical students called “First Year Funk” will work:

From the comments, it looks like this summarizes the First Year Funk for medical students quite well. I love the chorus that keeps repeating, “First year funk you up. First year funk you up.” Must have been a nice break from the challenges of med school.

Do You Use a Waterproof Keyboard in Your Practice or Hospital?

Posted on August 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I remember when I first saw a waterproof keyboard at HIMSS many many years ago. It was pretty amazing to see. Even back then, the argument for why you’d want a waterproof keyboard was compelling. When you think about the germs that are floating around every healthcare organization, the keyboard is the perfect haven for germs to collect. Without a waterproof keyboard, there’s really not a great way to clean the keyboards.

While waterproof keyboards have been around for a bunch of years, I haven’t seen them really take off in most organizations. I imagine cost plays one role, but I think the bigger role was the waterproof keyboards just weren’t as good. Most of the waterproof keyboards I’d seen were silicon keyboards. While they were certainly waterproof, they didn’t work quite as well as their plastic counterparts.

I was reminded of this when I got an email from Seal Shield about their new 100% waterproof, back-lit plastic keyboard.
Waterproof Keyboard
No doubt, this keyboard looks like any other regular keyboard. That’s a great thing. Although, it’s impressive that they’ve added not only the waterproof, but the back lighting as well. This is important in many hospitals where patients might be sleeping and the nurse or doctor might be working in the room.

Seal Shield has a wide variety of “dishwasher safe” products like this keyboard for a while. I wonder if healthcare is just waiting for a lawsuit to finally invest in some washable peripherals like these. I’m sure a simple swab of any keyboard in healthcare would make for a compelling story.
Waterproof Keyboard in Water

Why Aren’t We Using More Video Animations in Healthcare?

Posted on August 12, 2015 I Written By

The following is a post by Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum as part of the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with him on Twitter @ClinicSpectrum and @csvishal2222.
Vishal Gandhi
In healthcare we have a bit of an obsession with paper. We have stacks of education sheets in our office or print these sheets from our EHR. That’s not a bad thing, but most of them aren’t well designed and are generally ignored by patients. The same is true in marketing. I get stacks of paper in my mailbox full of marketing material from various companies that basically get ignored. It’s so bad that we’ve created a term for it: junk mail.

Isn’t it time that healthcare start looking beyond the paper and start embracing better ways of engaging patients and staff in our education and marketing? All you need to do is look at the popularity of YouTube to know that videos are not only powerful, but popular.

Humor and video animations are a great way to really engage the patient. Plus, they take education to an entirely new level. When you think about the complex problems we deal with in healthcare, a compelling video is the most effective way to educate patients and staff. A short well designed video is a powerful way to simplify a complex problem. Plus, your patients and staff are more likely to remember a high quality video.

At ClinicSpectrum, we’ve been working to develop a video animation capability which supports healthcare’s need for more engaging and effective video content. We’re just getting started, but here’s a quick look at some of the types of videos we’ve created to further the goal of more engaging videos in healthcare:

Healthcare Education and Patient Engagement Videos
Creating a Healthy Diet Plan – A simple patient education video
ICD-10 Training Videos – A series of short videos to train healthcare on ICD-10
Medical Billing Training Videos – These short videos train on the billing rules for the internal medicine specialty

Company Marketing
OB GYN Practice Profile – A great video profile of the Healthy Woman OB GYN practice
Company Brand Building Videos – This video outlines ClinicSpectrum’s Revenue Cycle Management services
New Company Leader Introduction – A great way to introduce a new leader to your customers and feature your company

Conferences
Conference Introduction Profiles – Here’s an example of a speaker introduction at a conference

Of course, we’re just getting started with what’s possible with video in healthcare. Do you use great videos in your practice, hospital, or organization? Would you like to see videos created about certain topics? We’d love to hear your thoughts on where you’ve seen video to be effective in healthcare or where you think it would be effective.

The future of medicine is going beyond the 15 minute office visit and engaging the patients whenever and wherever they might be. Plus, training staff is an ongoing challenge. Video is a great way to quickly educate patients and staff on important topics in a unique and often fun way. It’s time we go beyond the paper and start engaging in a much more dynamic way.

The Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts is sponsored by ClinicSpectrum, a leading provider of workflow automation solutions for healthcare. ClinicSpectrum offers a video animation service that will take your healthcare education and marketing to the next level. Connect with Clinic Spectrum on social media: @ClinicSpectrum.

Transferring Custody of a Chart to the Patient – Could That Drive Patient Engagement?

Posted on August 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently wrote about the concept of health information disposal and how we’re going to have to reevaluate how we approach disposing of patients charts in this new digital world. Plus, EHR vendors are going to have to build the functionality to make it a reality. However, some replied to that article that in this new world we shouldn’t ever dispose of charts.

We’ll leave that argument for that article (or in the comments) and instead discuss another concept that Deborah Green from AHIMA told me about. Deborah suggested that one possible solution for digital chart disposal would be to transfer custody of the chart to the patient. I think that terminology might not sit right with some people since the patient should have access to the chart regardless. However I think the word custody has a slightly different meaning.

When a healthcare organization is ready to dispose of an electronic chart based on their record retention laws (which usually vary by state), then it’s the perfect time to give patients the opportunity to download and retain a copy of their paper chart before it’s destroyed. In that way, the healthcare organization could worry less about deleting the electronic chart since they’ve transferred “custody” of the chart to the patient.

This removes the responsibility of storing the patient chart from the healthcare organization and puts it on the patients that want to have their entire medical chart. The perfect custodian of the patient chart is the patient. At least it should be.

I wonder if a healthcare organization informing patients that their old charts will be deleted would be enough to actually drive patient engagement and download of their electronic record. While meaningful use has required the view, download and transmit of records by patients, most people have been gaming that requirement without patients really getting the benefit. I have a feeling that patients hearing the words “deleted chart” would wake a lot of them up from their slumber. They wouldn’t know why they’d want the paper chart, but I imagine many would take action and preserve their medical record. Once they download the chart, it would be the first step towards actually engaging with their health data.

What do you think? Is transferring custody of the electronic record the right approach to health information disposal? Would this drive a new form of patient engagement? Would it wake up the sleeping giant which is involved patients?

Which EHR Are Available for Education?

Posted on August 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I remember 5 or more years ago writing about the need for EHR software to be available as part of a healthcare IT and medical education. Adding EHR education to a medical education is a much larger question we won’t discuss here (Where would you fit it?), but there’s a need for EHR software to be available for those in education.

This came to mind recently for two reasons. First, someone reached out to me to ask if there was an EHR that they could use as part of an EHR course that they’d created. It had been so long since I’d thought of the subject, I couldn’t remember the exact programs that were out there. I vaguely remembered Practice Fusion having a program (makes sense that a Free EHR would make their EHR available to education) for education and someone else (maybe Amazing Charts?). I’ve also known a number of the ONC funded community college programs using some form of Vista (the free open source EHR) in their program. However, I’d heard some bad reviews from people who had that experience. My guess is that they used a plain vanilla install of Vista and that wouldn’t likely mimic the real world.

Since the answer to my friend was pretty awful, I told her that I’d blog about it and see if there were other EHR vendors who would be willing to offer their EHR as part of an EHR course or other education endeavor. Just drop a comment on this post or let me know on the contact us page if you’d like me to connect you with my friend.

The second reason this was of interest to me is that one of my heroes (spiritual, business, and life) is now the President of a business college. I recently got a chance to have lunch with him and he asked about whether they should create a program that taught healthcare technology. They already had a medical coding course and wondered if health IT would be a good place to expand.

My answer to him was simple. If he could convince Epic or Cerner to let his students come away with an Epic or Cerner certification, then he should go for it. My only partial concern was that these graduates would come away with an Epic or Cerner certification, but only an associates degree. That might cause a problem for healthcare HR departments which often have Bachelor’s degree as a requirement to work at the hospital. I think most HR departments at hospitals would be perplexed how someone was Epic certified, but didn’t have a bachelor’s degree. However, they could probably work something out.

Having run the Healthcare IT Central job board for a number of years now, I know first hand the value of an Epic or Cerner certification. Is there another EHR certification (or experience) that’s really valuable and sought after out there? MEDITECH probably comes the closest. There is still quite a bit of demand for that expertise. Are there others you’re having problems filling?

Let me look at this another way. Which EHR systems would be valuable as part of an EHR course? Is the knowledge general enough that you could work on most of the EHR systems and switch to the next system? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

No doubt, demand for experience in these various EHR systems is going to be high. Although, what’s the right pathway for someone new to healthcare IT or new to EHR? Should we be training new health IT professionals in schools on these EHR? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Profound Message About End of Life in ZDoggMD Video

Posted on August 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

ZDoggMD recently teamed up with Wake Up The Movie (Coming Fall 2016) to create this profound video talking about End of Life and important topics like advanced directives. Without further ado, check out the video below:

The stories are starting to pile up in the comments of the video on YouTube. It’s amazing to read the stories about end of life. Here’s one from an EHR doc that stood out to me:

This is genius. I’m an ER doc, and I’ve done CPR on too many people who, had they just understood, would have opted for a DNR and died in a more dignified and humane way. I am all for life-saving measures, but reality is less glamorous and less optimistic than TV makes it out to be. People with advanced illness, or even simply advanced age, should really consider what they expect from their future and weigh that against the idea of being tortured on a gurney with the small chance of survival, only to be miserable in a hospital bed with an even smaller chance of returning to a normal or even fair quality of life. At this point in my life, of course, I would opt for all life-saving measures for myself (though I would rather be dead than be chronically in a vegetative state), but at some point in life, the scales should tip. Ignoring the issue and just accepting the default potentially leads to increased sadness and anguish for yourself and your loved ones down the road.

I’ve heard some of my geriatric doctor friends comment that we need to start having more meaningful discussions about end of life. I think that’s true. It’s a challenging discussion that nobody really wants to have, but it’s an important one. I know I was brought to tears when my wife and I have sat down and talked about many of the issues related to it. It’s not an easy topic, but I’m glad we’ve had the discussion and put our desires in writing. Now we just need EHRs and PHRs to support advance directives better than most do today.

HHS Privacy and Security Rules Cheat Sheet Infographic

Posted on August 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Scrypt has put out the infographic below to help summarize the guide to Privacy and Security of Electronic Health Information that HHS put out. Of course, the full guide is 62 pages of detailed information, but this will give you a flavor for what’s in the guide.
HHS Privacy and Security Rule Infographic

Will Personal Health Information Exchanges (PHIE) Lead the Consumer Medical Record Revolution and Bridge the Gap Between PHRs and EHRs? (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on August 5, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Cora Alisuag, RN, MN, MA, CFP, President & CEO, CORAnet Solutions, Inc.
Cora Alisuag, CEO, CORAnet Solutions
Be sure to check out part 1 in this series where we talked about the movement towards an empowered patient who controls their health record.

Lack of Interoperability Continues to Hamper Patient Record Access

However, it has been six years since the HITECH Act passed, yet most Americans seeking medical care are still unable to obtain their full medical records for a variety of reasons. Some hospitals will simply not release them or proprietary EHR system vendors not allowing hospitals, let alone patients, direct access.

This capability also comes at a critical time as enormous obstacles hamper the ability of people to obtain their medical records. This is documented in the ONC’s “2015 Report to Congress on Health Information Blocking” which concludes that it is apparent that some health care providers and health IT developers are knowingly interfering with the exchange of health information in ways that limit its availability and use to improve health and health care.

This situation is only going to worsen as the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) is considering a change to the EHR meaningful use rule that requires five percent of patients must view or download or transmit their health data to only one patient; not one percent, one patient.

Blue Button Not Gaining traction

In the meantime, other PHR technology has been introduced, but has not gained popularity including forays from Microsoft and Google. The ONC and other government organizations’ initiative to adopt and use the Blue Button platform for exchanging healthcare data between clinicians equipped with electronic health-record systems and patients with mobile computing devices is stalled, according to a recent survey by the not-for-profit Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI).

WEDI questioned 274 providers, health plans, HIT vendors and claims clearinghouses in the Second Annual Survey of Industry Awareness of Blue Button, conducted late in 2014. Only eight percent of respondents noted that their organizations actually used Blue Button, down from 15% of survey respondents in 2013.

PHRs Largely Unpopular

PHRs joined the lexicon of medical terminology several years ago as a convenience way for consumers to have copies of their medical records. It was largely born out of EHR’s lack of interoperability and access. However, as far back as 2009, a Health Affairs article detailed the major factors behind the slow adoption of PHRs. The article reviewed some of the reasons and includes cost, access, interoperability, security concerns, and data ownership.

Because health records which include clinical data, laboratory results and medical images do not flow freely among multiple organizations due to lack on EHR interoperability, PHRs do not automatically receive data. This means that the data must often be entered manually by consumers—a time-consuming and error-prone process. For most consumers, this lack of safe and reliable automation makes it problematic to maintain a PHR, and a PHR that is not up-to-date likely will not be used. Unlike PHIEs, the API-EHR connectivity connection is the missing link in PHRs.

However, the authors of the Health Affairs article offered a challenge. They described a gap between today’s personal health records (PHRs) and what patients say they want and need from this electronic tool for managing their health information. They noted that until that gap is bridged, it is unlikely that PHRs would be widely adopted, but noted that in the future; when these concerns are addressed, and health data is portable and understandable in content and format, PHRs will likely prove to be invaluable.

“While we all agree that lack of interoperability continues to stymie patient health record access and PHRs might not be the ultimate solution, but if a PHIE can bridge the gap by accessing EHR data through an open API while offering the security and convenience of a PHR. I believe PHIEs offer a solution that should satisfy the spontaneity of millennials’ and more frequent use of middle-aged and elderly users,” says Tiffany Casper, RNC, CNM, MSN and President of EMR Consultants which helps medical organizations transition to EMR systems.

About Cora Alisuag
Cora Alisuag is the CEO of CORAnet Solutions, Inc., a health information technology company. She is the inventor of CORAnet technology, the software engine that drives CORAnet’s Personal Health Information Exchange (PHIE), allowing patients’ mobile device access to their complete medical records. She is also an MN, MA, CFP and healthcare industry speaker and serial medical entrepreneur.

Will Personal Health Information Exchanges (PHIE) Lead the Consumer Medical Record Revolution and Bridge the Gap Between PHRs and EHRs? (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on August 4, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Cora Alisuag, RN, MN, MA, CFP, President & CEO, CORAnet Solutions, Inc.
Cora Alisuag, CEO, CORAnet Solutions
It has only been about two generations since traveling medicine shows were common forums for medical information. Phony research and medical claims were used to back up the sale of all kinds of dubious medicines. Potential patients had no real method to determine what was true or false, let alone know what their real medical issues were.

Healthcare has come a long way since those times, but similar to the lack of knowing the compositions of past medical concoctions and what ailed them, today’s digital age patients still don’t know what is in their medical records. They need transparency, not secret hospital –vendor contracts and data blocking, like the practices being questioned by the New York Times. One patient, Regina Holliday resorts to using art to bring awareness to the lack of patient’s access to their own medical records.

Testifying in July 2015 before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions, Direct Trust President and CEO David C. Kibbe, MD MBA, has urged the federal government to take action to help overcome the problems impeding the sharing of health information between and among parties authorized to access electronic health data, commonly referred to as “information blocking.”

“While the responsibility for assuring secure interoperable exchange resides primarily with the health care provider organizations, and not with the EHR (electronic health record) vendors nor the government, I strongly believe there is a role for government to encourage and incentivize collaborative and interoperable health information exchange,” testified Dr. Kibbe, one of the nation’s foremost authorities on health information exchange security issues.

There are many reasons patients want access. Second opinions, convenience, instant access in a medical emergency and right of ownership—I paid for them, I own them. Other reasons patients need to view their records is for accuracy and validity. Inaccurate record keeping has even caused the EHRI Institute to cite incorrect or missing data in EHRs and other health IT systems as the second highest safety concern in its annual survey, outlining the Top Ten Safety Concerns for Healthcare Organizations in 2015.

Healthcare system executives, from CIOs to CEOs are very aware of the increasing requirements from patients asking for their records and the various state and federal laws that come into play. However, they are also aware that by making it too easy for patients to access records they risk liability and HIPAA issues. They also don’t want to provide documents that can easily enable cost comparisons or raise questions about charges.

Consumers Uniting

Riding the wave of interest in accessing personal medical records are organizations like Get My Health Data. Org. The organization was founded in June 2015 as a collaborative effort among leading consumer organizations, health care experts, former policy makers and technology organizations that believe consumer access to digital health information is an essential cornerstone for better health and better care, coordinated by the National Partnership for Women & Families, a non-profit consumer organization. On July 4 it launched #DataIndependenceDay to create awareness for the HIPAA law which states that patients must be granted access to their health information with very few exceptions. An update to those laws that was finalized in 2013 extends these rights to electronic health records.

Despite the introduction of Personal Health Records (PHRs), Blue Button technology and product introductions from blue chip technology leaders such as Microsoft and Google, there has been no significant, unifying technology to ignite pent up demand for their medical records by consumers. This lack luster interest and ongoing interoperability issues might be the unifying force to drive many consumers to consider Personal Health Information Exchanges (PHIEs) as an alternative to EHRs and Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) that unnecessarily duplicate data and risk HIPAA violations.

Will PHIEs Ignite the Patient Record Access Movement?

Frost & Sullivan, in its research report, “Moving Beyond the Limitations of Fragmented Solutions Empowering Patients with Integrated, Mobile On-Demand Access to the Health Information Continuum”, identifies Personal Health Information Exchange (PHIEs). They are described as providing individual patients, physicians, and the full spectrum of ancillary providers with immediate, real-time access to medical records regardless of where they are stored by using an open API.

The PHIE can provide access to the entirety of an individual patient record, regardless of the number of sources or EHR systems in which the patient data resides. This technology is made possible through fully interoperable integration servers that can access any EHR system with available APIs and portray the integrated data in a viewable, secure and encrypted format on a mobile device.

By leveraging the powerful simplicity of open APIs, PHIE technology can also access medical records in a way that is much more comprehensive than the closed EMR portals commonly used by doctors’ offices. Despite their pervasive use, these portals are cumbersome and expensive for patient’s use. The portals also include the same lack of interoperability that plagues hospital EHR systems.

“PHIEs can be the breakthrough everyone has been waiting for; challenging every consumer health organization, third-party payer, hospital, ACO network, and Congress to recognize the need to move away from proprietary systems. Adoption of this technology would also demonstrate the healthcare industries’ commitment to allowing patients access to their own records,” notes Dr. Donald Voltz, an anesthesiologist at Aultman Hospital in Canton, Ohio who leads a campaign for EHR connectivity.

“If done correctly, PHIEs can lead in the consumer health information campaign for change, interoperability now, quality and safety through license relationships with hospitals, payers, telecommunications companies, mobile device firms and large employers. Interoperability issues could be a thing of the past and lead to integration with leading EMR systems, integration with HIEs, VAR agreements with health and wellness IT firms and application distribution through the online market place with Google Play and iTunes,” says Voltz.

Tomorrow in part 2 of the series we’ll talk about current interoperability efforts and the challenges they face.

About Cora Alisuag
Cora Alisuag is the CEO of CORAnet Solutions, Inc., a health information technology company. She is the inventor of CORAnet technology, the software engine that drives CORAnet’s Personal Health Information Exchange (PHIE), allowing patients’ mobile device access to their complete medical records. She is also an MN, MA, CFP and healthcare industry speaker and serial medical entrepreneur.

The Power of Writing Regularly

Posted on August 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Writing

Anyone who has written something regularly will appreciate the image above. The final sentiment is the important one: Writing is really hard work. Although, it produces amazing results.

At the recent HIM Summit, I participated in a session on social media where we covered LinkedIn, Twitter, and blogging. One of the key messages I tried to convey to attendees was the power in sharing your ideas. This is true on a forum in a group discussion or in blogging (and to a lesser extent on Twitter). Many people think that participating in these various social media platforms is about connection. Connection is a valuable benefit of social media engagement, but I think that the value of what you learn from writing is even more powerful.

In many ways, this concept was illustrated in my post that blogging requires you to raise your standard. It’s one thing to know something. It’s another thing to be able to do something. It’s another thing to know something and be able to do something so well that you can share it with other people. That’s the power of writing a blog or participating in a group where you share deep discussions. You have to really deeply know the subject to be able to write about it. That’s powerful!

Along with raising the bar of how deeply we understand a certain topic, publishing our thoughts and ideas on these social platforms provides people the opportunity to tell us we’re wrong. Ok, that’s probably a harsh way of saying it. The more politically correct way to say it might be to say that it provides people the opportunity to give us feedback on ways we can improve. No matter how you frame it, hundreds and thousands of people reading your content means that dozens will point out flaws in your thinking/process/ideas or they’ll add on with more details on how you can extend what you’re doing. That’s powerful!

I share this concept based on first hand experience. I wouldn’t know 1/100th of the things I know if I didn’t write on the Healthcare Scene blogs so regularly. Doing so requires me to really process ideas into something manageable and understandable. I have to also thank the tens of thousands of you who’ve educated me on things I didn’t understand previously. I’m better for it.

If you’re not writing regularly, I suggest you do it. I’m not suggesting everyone start a blog. You can and should if you’re really committed to doing it regularly, but most shouldn’t go that direction. Instead, you should guest post on other people’s sites or leverage LinkedIn’s new blogging platform where you have a built in audience (your connections) and there’s little expectation of how often you blog.

Try it out and see. You’ll realize that writing is hard. However, the benefits of doing so are powerful as well. As I’ve found regularly in life, the most powerful things are often the hardest.