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Thanksgiving Gratitude

Posted on November 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the US, today is Thanksgiving and so I thought it would be fun to show a bit of gratitude to each of my children on each of my blogs. Feel free to skip this post if you’re looking for Healthcare IT content on Thanksgiving. We’ll be back with our regularly scheduled content on Monday.

This probably says a lot about me, but I decided to put my oldest child on my oldest blog and so forth down the line based on age of the child and blog. With that alignment, EMRandHIPAA.com is host to my first child. Most of you don’t know, that my brother and I have casually been writing a daddy blog called Crash Dad where I refer to my kids as Crash Kids. So, on this blog I want to show some gratitude for Crash Kid #1.
crash-kid-1-4
Crash Kid #1 just oozes creativity. His passion for creating and designing is inspiring to me since it’s the opposite of me. Ever since he could talk he’s been surprising us with the way he looks at life. I’m grateful that he always teaches me what’s most important in life and doesn’t let me allow other things to distract. Talking with him before bed is the perfect way for me to end the day and I’m grateful to him for that.

Happy Thanksgiving! Who are you grateful for this day?

Gratitude for the #HITsm Community

Posted on November 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I wrote about the passing of the #HITsm torch to Healthcare Scene, I was so grateful thinking of the hundreds of incredible people in the #HITsm community that have impacted my life for good. There are too many stories to share here.

With that in mind, I knew that one key to my role in taking over the #HITsm Twitter chat was going to be to involve as many members of the #HITsm community as possible. I’ve already reached out and gotten commitments from @CancerGeek, @theGr8Chalupa, @ShimCode, @SarahBennight, and @Colin_Hung to help me curate the #HITsm hosts. I realized that if I did it alone, I would get sub-optimal results. However, by involving multiple people from a wide variety of perspectives we’d get a wide-ranging, diverse set of perspectives hosting the #HITsm chat.

While this is a great first step, I was inspired by @Matt_R_Fisher and @Resultant to open it up even more. Basically, let’s make it so the #HITsm Brain Trust can crowdsource the topics and hosts as much as possible. Matt and Joe also suggested that maybe out of these submissions we could create a set of topics that serve as a framework for discussions throughout the year. We’ll see what gets submitted, but I think it’s an interesting idea to have a number of themes that we cover in #HITsm throughout the year.

With this type of openness in mind, I created this form where anyone and everyone can participate by submitting topics and hosts for the #HITsm chat. Depending on the number of submissions, we may roll this into a survey where people can vote for topics and hosts they’d like to see most. We’ll still sprinkle in unique topics that might not be as popular though. Help us out and submit any ideas you have for #HITsm hosts and topics below:

Assuming the spam bots stay away, we’ve also made the submissions public so you can review what’s already been submitted before submitting your own. If you’d prefer to send us something privately, you can always connect with us on the Healthcare Scene contact us page or on Twitter (@techguy and @healthcarescene).

On this Thanksgiving week in the US, I also just wanted to say Thank You to all of the #HITsm community. The work we’re doing is important. Let’s all help each other to take what we’re doing to the next level. Healthcare needs us.

A Thankful Look at Healthcare Scene

Posted on November 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been recently working on the Healthcare Scene media kit (still being edited as we speak) and a presentation that illustrates the influence of Healthcare Scene. As part of that slide deck I gathered the numbers for this slide:

healthcare-scene-overview

As I look at any of these numbers, I have to admit that it’s really hard for me to comprehend any of them. We’re approaching the 11th anniversary of Healthcare Scene and it’s really hard for me to imagine how far we’ve come since that weekend I got bored and started blogging about EMR.

This week of gratitude, I’m particularly grateful for those people who trust Healthcare Scene for their daily cup of what’s interesting in healthcare IT. Amidst all the noise that exists in this world, it’s quite humbling to think that so many people look to this network of blogs to stay informed.

Just as humbling is the hundreds of companies that have sponsored the work we do at Healthcare Scene. What’s best is that most of our sponsors started out as readers. It’s gratifying to know that they valued the work we do enough to support our sites. A big thanks to our current crop of sponsors: The Breakaway Group, Stericycle Communications Solutions, HIPAA One, Kareo, Iron Mountain, Intel Health, Samsung, HIM on Call, Central Learning, Greythorn, Innovative Consulting Group, Cumberland Consulting Group, EMR Staffing Partners, UCSD Master in Health Informatics (Online)Galen Healthcare Solutions, and 4MedApproved. As sponsors, I’ve gotten to know each of these organizations quite well and they are all working hard to improve healthcare.

This Thanksgiving Week, I just wanted to take a minute to celebrate and show gratitude to all of you. Thanks for reading. Thanks for commenting. Thanks for sponsoring. Thanks for sharing on social media. Thanks for the private messages and responses. Thanks for the likes and hearts and favorites and retweets. I feel blessed to be part of such an amazing community. I can’t wait to see what happens with healthcare IT over the next decade.

Are Healthcare Data Streams Rich Enough To Support AI?

Posted on November 21, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As I’ve noted previously, artificial intelligence and machine learning applications are playing an increasingly important role in healthcare. The two technologies are central to some intriguing new data analytics approaches, many of which are designed to predict which patients will suffer from a particular ailment (or progress in that illness), allowing doctors to intervene.

For example, at New York-based Mount Sinai Hospital, executives are kicking off a predictive analytics project designed to predict which patients might develop congestive heart failure, as well as to care for those who’ve are done so more effectively. The hospital is working with AI vendor CloudMedx to make the predictions, which will generate predictions by mining the organization’s EMR for clinical clues, as well as analyzing data from implantable medical devices, health tracking bands and smartwatches to predict the patient’s future status.

However, I recently read an article questioning whether all health IT infrastructures are capable of handling the influx of data that are part and parcel with using AI and machine learning — and it gave me pause.

Artificial intelligence, the article notes, functions on collected data, and the more data AI solution has access to, the more successful the implementation will be, contends Elizabeth O’Dowd in HIT Infrastructure. And there are some questions as to whether healthcare IT departments can integrate this data, especially Internet of Things datapoints such as wearables and other personal devices.

After all, O’Dowd notes, for the AI solution to crawl data from IoT wearables, mobile apps and other connected devices, the data must be integrated into the patient’s medical record in a format which is compatible with the organization’s EMR technology. Otherwise, the organization’s data analytics solution won’t be able to process the data, and in turn, the AI solution won’t be able to evaluate it, she writes.

Without a doubt, O’Dowd has raised some important issues here. But the real question, as I see it, is whether such data integration is really the biggest bottleneck AI and machine learning must pass through before becoming accessible to a wide range of users. For example, healthcare AI-based Lumiata offers a FHIR-compliant API to help organizations integrate such data, which is certainly relevant to this discussion.

It seems to me that giving the AI every possible scrap of data to feed on isn’t the be all and end all, and may even actually less important than the clinical rationale developers uses to back up its work. In other words, in the case of Lumiata and its competitors, it appears that creating a firm foundation for the predictions is still as much the work of clinicians as much is AI.

I guess what I’m getting to here is that while AI is doubtless more effective at predicting events as it has access to more data, using what data we have with and letting skilled clinicians manage it is still quite valuable. So let’s not back off on harvesting the promise of AI just because we don’t have all the data in hand yet.

Ignoring the Obvious: Major Health IT Organizations Put Aside Patients

Posted on November 18, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Frustrated stories from patients as well as health care providers repeatedly underline the importance of making a seismic shift in the storage and control of patient data. The current system leads to inaccessible records, patients who reach nursing homes or other treatment centers without information crucial to their care, excess radiation from repeated tests, massive data breaches that compromise thousands of patients at a time, and–most notably for quality–patients excluded from planning their own care.

A simple solution became available over the past 25 years with the widespread adoption of the Web, and has been rendered even easier by modern Software as a Service (SaaS): storing the entire record over the patient’s lifetime with the patient. This was unfeasible in the age of patient records, but is currently efficient, secure, and easy to manage. The only reason we didn’t switch to personal records years ago is the greed and bad faith of the health care institutions: keeping hold of the data allows them to exploit it in order to market treatments to patients that they don’t need, while hampering the ability of other institutions to recruit and treat patients.

So I wonder how the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) can’t feel ridiculous, if not a bit seamy, by releasing a 3000-word report on the patient data crisis this past October without even a hint at the solution. On the contrary: using words designed to protect the privileges of the health care provider, they call this crisis a “patient matching” problem. The very terminology sets in stone the current practice of scattering health records among providers, with the assumption that selective records will be recombined for particular treatment purposes–if those records can be found.

A reading of their report reveals that the crisis outpaces the tepid remedies suggested by conventional institutions. In a survey, institutions admitted that up to eight percent of their patients have duplicate records in the institutions own systems (six percent of the survey respondents reported this high figure). Institutions also report spending large efforts on mitigating the problems of duplicate records: 47 percent do so during patient registration, and 72 percent run efforts on a weekly basis. AHIMA didn’t even ask about the problems caused by lack of access to records from other providers.

To pretend they are addressing the problem without actually offering the solution, AHIMA issues some rather bizarre recommendations. Along with extending the same processes currently in use, they suggest using biometrics such as fingerprints or retinal scans. This has a worrisome impact on patient privacy–it puts out more and more information that is indelibly linked to persons and that can be used to track those persons. What are the implications of such recommendations in the current environment, which features not only targeted system intrusions by international criminal organizations, but the unaccountable transfer of data by those authorized to collect it? We should strenuously oppose the collection of unnecessary personal information. But it makes sense for a professional organization to seek a solution that leads to the installation of more equipment, requires more specialized staff, tightens their control over individuals, and raises health care costs.

There’s nothing wrong with certain modest suggestions in the AHIMA report. Standardizing the registration process and following the basic information practices they recommend (compliance with regulations, etc.) should be in place at any professional institution. But none of that will bring together the records doctors and other health care professionals need to deliver care.

Years ago, Microsoft HealthVault and Google Health tried to bring patient control into the mainstream. Neither caught on, because the time was not right. A major barrier to adoption was resistance by health care providers, who (together with the vendors of their electronic health records) disallowed patients from downloading provider data. The Department of Veterans Affairs Blue Button won fans in both the veterans’ community and a few other institutions (for instance, Kaiser Permanente supported it) but turned out to be an imperfect standard and was never integrated into a true patient-centered health system.

But cracks in the current system are appearing as health care providers are shoved toward fee-for-value systems. Technologies are also coalescing around personal records. Notably, the open source HIE of One project, described in another article, employs standard security and authentication protocols to give patients control over what data gets sent out and who receives it.

Patient control, not patient “matching,” is the future of health care. The patient will ensure that her doctors and any legitimate researchers get access to data. Certainly, there are serious issues left, such as data management for patients who have trouble with the technical side of the storage systems, and informed consent protocols that give researchers maximum opportunities for deriving beneficial insights from patient data. But the current system isn’t working for doctors or researchers any better than it is for patients. A strong personal health record system will advance us in all areas of health care.

Quality Reporting: A Drain on Practice Resources, New Study Shows

Posted on November 17, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Steven Marco, CISA, ITIL, HP SA and President of HIPAA One®.
Steven Marco - HIPAA expert
If time is money, medical practices are sure losing a lot of both based on the findings in a new study published in Health Affairs. The key take-a-way, practices spend an average of 785 hours per physician and $15.4 billion per year reporting quality measures to Medicare, Medicaid and private payers.

The study, conducted by researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College, assessed the quality reporting of 1,000 practices, including primary care, cardiology, orthopedic and multi-specialty and the findings are staggering.

Practices reported spending on average 15.1 hours per week per physician on quality measures. Of that 15.1 hours per week, physicians account for 2.6 hours with the rest of the administrative work divided between nurses and medical assistants. About 12 of those 15.1 hours are spent logging data into medical records solely for quality reporting purposes. Additionally, despite a wealth of software tools on the market today, about 80 percent of practices spend more time managing quality measures than they did three years ago and half call it a “significant burden.”

Aside from the major drain on administrative resources, there are heavy financial ramifications for such lengthy and cumbersome reporting as well. The report found practices spend an average of $40,069 per physician for an annual national total of $15.4 billion.

The findings of this study clearly demonstrate the need for greater reporting automation in the healthcare industry. By embracing technology to manage labor-intensive, error-prone and mundane tasks; practices free up their staff to focus on patient care. In the past few years, we have watched electronic medical record (EMR) companies do just that by embracing cloud-based software solutions.
physician-and-administrator-growth-over-time
This overwhelming administrative bloat and financial burden can be addressed by implementing software tools and solutions designed to streamline reporting and compliance management. For example, if your practice or organization is still conducting your annual risk analysis through spreadsheets and other manual methods, it is time to embrace automation and a Security Risk Analysis software solution. Designed to control costs, a cloud based Security Risk Analysis solution automates 78% of the manual labor needed to calculate risk for organizations of all size.

There’s no time like the present to embrace best practices for your quality reporting. Allow technology to do the heavy lifting and free up your resources.

About Steven Marco
Steven Marco is the President of HIPAA One®, leading provider of HIPAA Risk Assessment software for practices of all sizes.  HIPAA One is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA and the effort to make HIPAA compliance more accessible for all practices.  Are you HIPAA Compliant?  Take HIPAA One’s 5 minute HIPAA security and compliance quiz to see if your organization is risk or learn more at HIPAAOne.com.

What Would A Community Care Plan Look Like?

Posted on November 16, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Recently, I wrote an article about the benefits of a longitudinal patient record and community care plan to patient care. I picked up the idea from a piece by an Orion Health exec touting the benefits of these models. Interestingly, I couldn’t find a specific definition for a community care plan in the article — nor could I dig anything up after doing a Google search — but I think the idea is worth exploring nonetheless.

Presumably, if we had a community care plan in place for each patient, it would have interlocking patient-specific and population health-level elements to it. (To my knowledge, current population health models don’t do this.) Rather than simply handing patients off from one provider to another, in the hope that the rare patient-centered medical home could manage their care effectively on its own, it might set care goals for each patient as part of the larger community strategy.

With such a community care strategy, groups of providers would have a better idea where to allocate resources. It would simultaneously meet the goals of traditional medical referral patterns, in which clinicians consult with one another on strategy, and help them decide who to hire (such as a nurse-practitioner to serve patient clusters with higher levels of need).

As I envision it, a community care plan would raise the stakes for everyone involved in the care process. Right now, for example, if a primary care doctor refers a patient to a podiatrist, on a practical level the issue of whether the patient can walk pain-free is not the PCP’s problem. But in a community-based care plan, which help all of the individual actors be accountable, that podiatrist couldn’t just examine the patient, do whatever they did and punt. They might even be held to quantitative goals, if the they were appropriate to the situation.

I also envision a community care plan as involving a higher level of direct collaboration between providers. Sure, providers and specialists coordinate care across the community, minimally, but they rarely talk to each other, and unless they work for the same practice or health system virtually never collaborate beyond sharing care documentation. And to be fair, why should they? As the system exists today, they have little practical or even clinical incentive to get in the weeds with complex individual patients and look at their future. But if they had the right kind of community care plan in place for the population, this would become more necessary.

Of course, I’ve left the trickiest part of this for last. This system I’ve outlined, basically a slight twist on existing population health models, won’t work unless we develop new methods for sharing data collaboratively — and for reasons I be glad to go into elsewhere, I’m not bullish about anything I’ve seen. But as our understanding of what we need to get done evolves, perhaps the technology will follow. A girl can hope.

The Teeter Totter of Security and Usability – Tony Scott, US CIO at #CHIME16

Posted on November 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently at the CHIME Fall Forum and had the privilege of hearing a keynote presentation by Tony Scott, US Federal CIO, that was made possible by Infinite Computer Solutions. Tony Scott has a fascinating background at VM Ware, Microsoft, Disney and GM which gives him a pretty unique perspective on technology and his topic of cybersecurity.

During Tony’s keynote, he made a great plea for all of us working in healthcare IT when he said:

Cybersecurity is important and there’s something that each one of us can do about it!

When it comes to Cybersecurity I think that many people throw up their arms and think that there’s not much they can do. However, if we all do our small part in improving cybersecurity, then the aggregate result would be powerful. That’s something each of us in healthcare should take seriously as we think of how cybersecurity issues could literally impact the care patients receive going forward.

Along these same lines, Tony Scott also suggested that members of CHIME (largely healthcare CIOs) should work to share with peers. Cybersecurity is such a challenging problem, we have to share and learn from each other. I saw this happening first hand in a few of the cybersecurity sessions I attended at the conference. Healthcare CIOs were happily sharing security best practices with each other. The reality is that everyone in healthcare suffers when healthcare organizations suffer a breach and erode the confidence of patients. So, we all benefit by sharing our experience and knowledge about cybersecurity with each other.

Tony Scott also framed the cybersecurity challenge when he said, “Every time we have a breach, we could think of it as a quality issue.” No doubt this was calling back to his days at GM when quality issues were a major challenge, but what a great way to frame a breach. When there’s a breach, there’s something wrong with the quality of the product we provide our healthcare organizations and ultimately patients. With that mindset, we can go about making sure that the health IT product we provide is of the highest quality.

While I enjoyed each of these insights from Tony Scott’s keynote, I had the unique opportunity to be able to head backstage to the green room to talk privately with Tony Scott and the team from Infinite Computer Solutions that was hosting him as keynote. We had a brief but interesting discussion about his keynote and the challenges of cybersecurity in healthcare.

During our discussion, Tony Scott offered an important insight about the balance of cybersecurity and usability when he compared it to a teeter totter. Far too many organizations treat cybersecurity and usability like a teeter totter. If you make something more secure, then that makes things less usable. If you make things more usable, then they’re going to be less secure. Or at least that’s how many people look at cybersecurity.

In my discussion with Tony, he argued that we need to look at ways to raise the teeter totter up so that there’s not this give and take between security and usability. We should look for ways to make things extremely usable, but also secure. I’d suggest that this is the challenge we must face head on in healthcare over the next decade. Let’s not just settle ourselves with the teeter totter effect of security and usability, but let’s strive to raise the teeter totter up so we preserve both.

Vocera Aims For More Intelligent Hospital Interventions

Posted on November 14, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Everyday scenes that Vocera Communications would like to eliminate from hospitals:

  • A nurse responds to an urgent change in the patient’s condition. While the nurse is caring for the patient, monitors continue to go off with alerts about the situation, distracting her and increasing the stress for both herself and the patient.

  • A monitor beeps in response to a dangerous change in a patient’s condition. A nurse pages the physician in charge. The physician calls back to the nurse’s station, but the nurse is off on another task. They play telephone tag while patient needs go unmet around the floor.

  • A nurse is engaged in a delicate operation when her mobile device goes off, distracting her at a crucial moment. Neither the patient she is currently working with nor the one whose condition triggered the alert gets the attention he needs.

  • A nurse describes a change in a patient’s condition to a physician, who promises to order a new medication. The nurse then checks the medical record every few minutes in the hope of seeing when the order went through. (This is similar to a common computing problem called “polling”, where a software or hardware component wakes up regularly just to see whether data has come in for it to handle.)

Wasteful, nerve-racking situations such as these have caught the attention of Vocera over the past several years as it has rolled out communications devices and services for hospital staff, and have just been driven forward by its purchase of the software firm Extension Healthcare.

Vocera Communications’ and Extension Healthcare’s solutions blend to take pressures off clinicians in hospitals and improve their responses to patient needs. According to Brent Lang, President and CEO of Vocera Communications, the two companies partnered together on 40 customers before the acquisition. They take data from multiple sources–such as patient monitors and electronic health records–to make intelligent decisions about “when to send alarms, whom to send them to, and what information to include” so the responding nurse or doctor has the information needed to make a quick and effective intervention.

Hospitals are gradually adopting technological solutions that other parts of society got used to long ago. People are gradually moving away from setting their lights and thermostats by hand to Internet-of-Things systems that can adjust the lights and thermostats according to who is in the house. The combination of Vocera and Extension Healthcare should be able to do the same for patient care.

One simple example concerns the first scenario with which I started this article. Vocera can integrate with the hospital’s location monitoring (through devices worn by health personnel) that the system can consult to see whether the nurse is in the same room as the patient for whom the alert is generated. The system can then stop forwarding alarms about that patient to the nurse.

The nurse can also inform the system when she is busy, and alerts from other patients can be sent to a back-up nurse.

Extension Healthcare can deliver messages to a range of devices, but the Vocera badge and smartphone app work particularly well with it because they can deliver contextual information instead of just an alert. Hospitals can define protocols stating that when certain types of devices deliver certain types of alerts, they should be accompanied by particular types of data (such as relevant vital signs). Extension Healthcare can gather and deliver the data, which the Vocera badge or smartphone app can then display.

Lang hopes the integrated systems can help the professionals prioritize their interventions. Nurses are interrupt-driven, and it’s hard for them to keep the most important tasks in mind–a situation that leads to burn-out. The solutions Vocera is putting together may significantly change workflows and improve care.

Continuing the Tradition of #HITsm

Posted on November 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday, the Health Standards blog announced that Healthcare Scene would be taking over the #HITsm Twitter chat. If you’re like me, then you’re probably a little shocked by the idea. At least I was when Chad (@ochotex) sent me an email asking me if I wanted to run the #HITsm chat. I was surprised, but excited by the opportunity to help lead a community that I love so much.

Much to Chad’s chagrin (I think), it took me a couple weeks to decide if I wanted the responsibility of taking it over. I know that organizing Twitter chats is a lot of work. It’s really amazing what Erica, Michelle, Angela and Chad have done over almost 6 years of hosting approximately 280 #HITsm chats. That’s a body of work for which they can be extremely proud. I hope that Healthcare Scene can live up to that high standard.

As I thought through this decision, I thought back to the early days of #HITsm. It was such an extraordinary time of discovery and connection for everyone involved. I’d been on Twitter for ~4 years before #HITsm was started, but I don’t think I really understood the extreme value of Twitter until the #HITsm community came together. Indeed, the community was the most powerful part of the experience and that carried over to in person meetings at conferences. It’s amazing to think through the hundreds and thousands of people that I wouldn’t have met if it weren’t for the #HITsm chat. They make so many parts of healthcare IT better.

While I still think that discovering new connections is a great part of #HITsm, I also think it’s time to think about how to grow it beyond just discovering new and fascinating people and companies. What that will be, I don’t yet know. What I do know is that connecting deeply with smart, passionate people is a recipe for amazing results. Healthcare needs this kind of deep connection and collaboration and I think #HITsm is one platform that can help make that a reality.

My plan for #HITsm is to involve as many people as possible as I carry on the tradition that has already been laid. I’ve reached out to a number of community members who will help me curate topics and hosts for the chat and we’ll need the support of hundreds more as we work to take #HITsm to the next level. Plus, if you’re passionate about a topic we should be discussing on #HITsm or have other ideas on how to make the community better, let us know on our contact us page or on Twitter (@techguy or @healthcarescene). We’re open to new ideas and we’re not afraid to experiment with something new that could benefit the community.

With that in mind, the first #HITsm chat that will be hosted by Healthcare Scene will be on December 2nd and we’re going to explore the question “What’s next for #HITsm?” We hope you will all attend the chat and share your thoughts on how the #HITsm chat can provide more value to the community. If you’ve never participated in the #HITsm chat before, all you have to do is watch and tweet your thoughts using the #HITsm hashtag on Twitter every Friday at Noon ET (9 AM PT).

Here’s the full schedule of #HITsm chats through the end of the year:
11/18 – #HITsm Chat by Health Standards
Hosted by Chad Johnson (@OchoTex) and @HealthStandards

11/25 – No Chat – Happy Thanksgiving!

12/2 – What’s Next for #HITSM?
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from Healthcare Scene

12/9 – Innovation in Customer Experience and Digital Health
Hosted by Steve Sisko (@ShimCode) from ShimCode.com

12/16 – Reputation Management
Hosted by Erika Johansen (@thegr8chalupa) from Splash Media

12/23 – No Chat – Happy Holidays!

12/30 – No Chat – Happy New Year!

We’ll be working over the next couple weeks and months to create a permanent home on the Healthcare Scene network for the #HITsm community. Give us a little time to get it all together and then we’ll do our best to continue to make it better over time.

We’re excited to be part of #HITsm and look forward to shepherding it as we enter the next phase of its evolution!