Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Never Sell Your EHR Company – According to eCW Founder

Posted on January 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently came across an interesting article in Entrepreneur magazine authored by Girish Navani, CEO and Co-founder of eClinicalWorks. If you read this site, you know doubt are familiar with the quite popular eCW EHR software. In this article Girish gives some interesting insight into the future of eCW as a company:

After grad school, I set out to create my own version of my father’s bridge. After working many odd jobs developing software, I created credit check software for an acquaintance’s business. This made him a lot of money, which prompted me to ask (perhaps naively) for a share of the profit. I had developed a very successful facet of the company – didn’t I deserve it? His response surprised me, but I will never forget it. He said, “If you build something you like, don’t sell it.”

Twenty years later, I still remember my acquaintance’s advice. For that reason, my company, eClinicalWorks is, and always will be, a privately-held company. I have no interest in selling it, regardless of any offer I may get. In addition, we don’t use investor cash or spend money we don’t have.

This is not a philosophy that is unique to eCW. #1 on Epic’s list of principles is “Do not go public.” I imagine that Judy Faulkner (CEO of Epic) has a somewhat similar philosophy to Girish. There are certainly a lot of advantages to not going public and most of them get down to control. I’ll never forget when I heard one of the Marriott children talk about their decision to stay a private company. He said that Marriott would likely be a lot bigger if they had become a public company, but they would have lost a lot of the company culture if they’d chose to do so.

I imagine this is a similar feeling that Epic and eCW share. However, there’s also some accountability that comes with being a public company as well. It’s not easy for an organization to assess the financial well being of a private company. During the golden age of EHR which we just experienced, that hasn’t been an issue for either eCW or Epic. However, as we exit this golden age of EHR that was propped up by $36 billion in government stimulus money, the financial future may be quite different.

As in most things in life, there are pros and cons to staying private or going public. It’s interesting that two of the major EHR players (eCW and Epic) have made it clear that they have no interest in ever going public. We’ll see how that plays out long term.

Top 4 HIT Challenges and Opportunities for Healthcare Organizations in 2015 – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on January 15, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Mitchell Woll, Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Mitchell Woll - The Breakaway Group
Healthcare organizations face numerous challenges in 2015: ICD-10 implementation, HIPAA compliance, new Meaningful Use objectives, and the Office of the National Coordinator’s (ONC) interoperability road map.  To adapt successfully, organizations must take advantage of numerous opportunities to prepare.

Healthcare leaders must thoroughly assess, prioritize, prepare, and execute in each area:

  1. Meaningful Use Stage 2 objectives require increased patient engagement and reporting for a full year before earning incentives.
  2. The ONC’s interoperability road map demands a new framework to achieve successful information flow between healthcare systems over the next ten years.
  3. There are 10 months left in which to prepare for the October 1 ICD-10 deadline.
  4. HIPAA compliance will be audited.

1. Meaningful Use
For those who have already implemented an EHR, Meaningful Use Stage 2 focuses new efforts on patient access to personal health data and emphasizes the exchange of health information between patient and providers. Stage 2 also imposes financial penalties for failure to meet requirements.

CMS’s latest deadline for Stage 2 extends through 2016, so healthcare organizations have additional time to fulfill Stage 2 requirements. Stage 3 requirements begin in 2017, so healthcare organizations should take the extra time to build interoperability and foster an internal culture of collaboration between providers and patients. For Stage 3, Medicare incentives will not apply in 2017 and EHR penalties will rise to 3 percent.

CMS has also proposed a 2015 EHR certification, which requests interoperability enhancement to support transitions of care.  Complying with this certification is voluntary, but provides the opportunity to become certified for Medicare and Medicaid EHR incentive programs at the same time.

Meaningful Use Stage 2 and the ONC roadmap require that 2015 efforts concentrate on interoperability. Healthcare organizations should prepare for health information exchange by focusing efforts on building patient portals and integrating communications by automating phone, text, and e-mail messages. After setting up successful exchange methods, healthcare organizations should train staff how to use patient portals. The delay in Stage 2 means providers have more time to become comfortable using the technology to correspond with patients. Hospitals should also educate patients about these resources, describing the benefits of collaboration between providers and patients. Positive collaboration and successful data exchange helps achieve desired health outcomes faster.

2. Interoperability
The three-year goal of the ONC’s 10-year roadmap is for providers and patients to be able to send, receive, find, and use basic health information. The six and ten-year goals then build on the initial objectives, improving interoperability into the future.

Congress has also shown initiative on promoting interoperability asking the ONC to investigate information blocking by EHRs. Most of the ONC’s roadmap for the next three years is similar to Meaningful Use Stage 2 goals.

Sixty-four percent of Americans do not use patient portals, so for 2015 healthcare organizations should focus on creating them, refining their workflows, and encouraging patients to use them. Additionally, 35 percent of patients said they are unaware of patient portals, while 31 percent said their physician has never mentioned them. Fifty-six percent of patients ages 55-64, and 46 percent of patients 65 and older, said they would access medical information more if it were available online. Hospitals need their own staff to use and promote patient portals in order to conquer the challenges of interoperability and Stage 2.

3. HIPAA Compliance
In 2015, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) will audit EHR use, looking closely at HIPAA security, incentive payments, possible fraud, and contingency plan requirements. Also during the HIPAA compliance audit, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) will confirm whether hospitals’ policies and procedures meet updated security criteria.  Healthcare organizations should take this opportunity to verify compliance with 2013 HIPAA standards to prepare for upcoming audits. Many helpful resources exist, including HIPAA compliance toolkits, available from several publishers. These kits include advice on privacy and security models. Healthcare organizations and leaders can also take advantage of online education, or hire consultants to help review and implement the necessary measures. It’s important that action be taken now to educate staff about personal health information security and how to remain HIPAA compliant.

4. ICD-10 Deadline
The new ICD-10 deadline comes as no surprise now that it was delayed several times. In July 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) implemented the most recent delay and set a new date of Oct. 1, 2015, giving hospitals a 10-month window to prepare for the eventual ICD-10 rollout. Because healthcare organizations are more adaptable than ever, they can use their practiced flexibility and experience to meet these demands successfully.

As Health Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) suggests, communication, education and testing must be part of an ICD-10 implementation plan. Informing internal staff and external partners of the transition is a crucial first step. ICD-10 should be tested internally and externally to verify the system works with the new codes before the transition. Healthcare organizations should outline and develop an ICD-10 training program by selecting a training team and assessing the populations who need ICD-10 education. They should perform a gap analysis to understand the training needed and utilize role-based training to educate the proper populations. Finally, organizations should establish the training delivery method, whether online, in the classroom, one-on-one, or some combination of these to teach different topics or levels of proficiency. In my experience at The Breakaway Group, I’ve seen that the most effective and efficient education is role-based, readily-accessible, and offers learners hands-on experience performing tasks essential to their role. This type of targeted education ensures learners are proficient before the implementation. As with any go-live event, healthcare organizations must prepare and deliver the new environment, providing support throughout the event and beyond.

Facing 2015
These challenges require the same preparation, willingness, and audacity needed for prior HIT successes, including EHR implementation and meeting Meaningful Use Stage 1 requirements. ICD-10, HIPAA compliance, Stage 2, and interoperability all have the element of education in common. Healthcare organizations and leaders should apply the same tenacity and discipline to inform, educate, and prepare clinicians for upcoming obligations.

Targeted role-based education will best ensure proficiency and avoid comprehensive, costly, and time-consuming system training. Through role-based education, healthcare organizations gain more knowledgeable personnel who are up to speed on new applications. These organizations probably already have at least a foundation for 2015 expectations, and they should continue to recall the strategies used for prior go-live events. What was successful? It’s important to plan to replicate successful strategies, alleviating processes that caused problems.  This is great opportunity to capitalize efforts for organizational improvements. Healthcare leaders must let the necessity of 2015 government requirements inspire invention and innovation, ultimately strengthening their organizations.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

De-Identification of Data in Healthcare

Posted on January 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I had a chance to sit down with Khaled El Emam, PhD, CEO and Founder of Privacy Analytics, to talk about healthcare data and the de-identification of that healthcare data. Data is at the center of the future of healthcare IT and so I was interested to hear Khaled’s perspectives on how to manage the privacy and security of that data when you’re working with massive healthcare data sets.

Khaled and I started off the conversation talking about whether healthcare data could indeed be de-identified or not. My favorite Patient Privacy Rights advocate, Deborah C. Peel, MD, has often made the case for why supposedly de-identified healthcare data is not really private or secure since it can be re-identified. So, I posed that question to Khaled and he suggested that Dr. Peel is only telling part of the story when she references stories where healthcare data has been re-identified.

Khaled makes the argument that in all of the cases where healthcare data has been reidentified, it was because those organizations did a poor job of de-identifying the data. He acknowledges that many healthcare organizations don’t do a good job de-identifying healthcare data and so it is a major problem that Dr. Peel should be highlighting. However, just because one organization does a poor job de-identifying data, that doesn’t mean that proper de-identification of healthcare data should be thrown out.

This kind of reminds me of when people ask me if EHR software is secure. My answer is always that EHR software can be more secure than paper charts. However, it depends on how well the EHR vendor and the healthcare organization’s staff have done at implementing security procedures. When it’s done right, an EHR is very secure. When it’s done wrong, and EHR could be very insecure. Khaled is making a similar argument when it comes to de-identified health data.

Khaled did acknowledge that the risks are never going to be 0. However, if you de-identify healthcare data using proper techniques, the risks are small enough that they are similar to the risks we take every day with our healthcare data. I think this is an important point since the reality is that organizations are going to access and use healthcare data. That is not going to stop. I really don’t think there’s any debate on this. Therefore, our focus should be on minimizing the risks associated with this healthcare data sharing. Plus, we should hold organizations accountable for the healthcare data sharing their doing.

Khaled also suggested that one of the challenges the healthcare industry faces with de-identifying healthcare data is that there’s a shortage of skilled professionals who know how to do it properly. I’d suggest that many who are faced with de-identifying data have the right intent, but likely lack the skills needed to ensure that the healthcare data de-identification is done properly. This isn’t a problem that will be solved easily, but should be helped as data security and privacy become more important.

What do you think of de-identification in healthcare? Is the way it’s being done a problem today? I see no end to the use of data in healthcare, and so we really need to make sure we’re de-identifying healthcare data properly.

4 Ways Your Practice Can Benefit from a Mix of Technology and Human Touch

Posted on January 13, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum as part of the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with him on Twitter @ClinicSpectrum and @csvishal2222.
Vishal Gandhi
One of the biggest misnomers about an EHR implementation is that it will replace many of the human elements of your practice. While the EHR can replace some of the tasks and processes that were done by humans, the reality is that EHR software is most powerful when paired with human touch. This concept is infused into our Ideal Medical Practice Workflow whitepaper and should be infused into every clinical practice.

As we enter 2015, here’s a look at 4 more ways your practice can benefit from a mix of technology and human touch:

1. Rescheduling Patients
One of the biggest forms of lost revenue for a practice comes in not rescheduling patients who missed their appointment. While some of these missed appointments represent low quality patients, many missed appointments happen for a good reason and are an opportunity for more revenue for your practice. Unfortunately, most practices don’t consistently reach out to patients and reschedule their appointment. Along with providing additional revenue for your practice, this extra patient outreach is a great form of customer service that will be appreciated by many of your patients and shared with their friends. While some of the rescheduling can be done using technology like emails and text messages, nothing shows a patient you care about them more than a telephone call about a missed appointment.

2. Complete Eligibility Verification
I’ve written previously about the importance of complete eligibility verification and a quality eligibility verification team. While having the correct eligibility information is always important, I can’t stress how much more important eligibility verification is at the start of a new year. At the start of a new year, patients once again are working to meet their deductible and therefore have a higher patient pay amount. Plus, the new ACA insurance plans means many patients will start the new year off with a new insurance plan. If you don’t have a 100% consistent process for verifying a patient’s eligibility, then you’re office is likely working off of old information which will hamper your ability to collect the correct payment from the patient.

3. Referral Tracking
Not appropriately tracking referrals is a big issue in many practices that can easily be handled with a mix of technology and human follow up. Not tracking these referrals is a big clinical compliance issue for your practice that has the potential to lead to a lawsuit. Along with the potential legal liability, I believe having a dedicated team following up on these orders will become extremely important in the new world of value based reimbursement and ACOs. In this next generation of reimbursement, your payment will depend on your ability to ensure patient compliance with outside referrals.

4. Annual Well Visit Reminders
Annual Well visit reminders are another great way to increase high quality visits to your practice. Many practices convert a regular visit into an Annual Well visit. While this may seem convenient for the patient, it usually means you’re cutting the patient short in the care you could provide them. You just don’t have the time in a sick visit to do a thorough well visit exam as well. Even more important is reaching out to those patients you haven’t seen for a while. It’s incredibly valuable to have a dedicated person or team who identifies all of these patients and sends them a reminder or calls them about their annual well visit. Plus, these annual well visits are a great way to add to your bottom line.

As you look at each of these 4 ways to improve your practice, they all require the right mix of technology and human touch to be done properly. In a busy practice, that can often mean hiring more staff or outsourcing some of these processes to an outside company. Either way, the value created for your practice by implementing these small but important changes will easily offset any additional costs. Plus, you’ll have happier and healthier patients in the process.

The Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts is sponsored by ClinicSpectrum, a leading provider of workflow automation solutions for healthcare. You can download the Ideal Medical Practice Workflow whitepaper from ClinicSpectrum for FREE.

HIPAA Security and Compliance Thoughts from the Healthcare Cyber Security Summit

Posted on January 12, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Anna Drachenberg, Founder and CEO of HIPAA Risk Management.
Anna Drachenberg
It’s taken a while to collect our team’s thoughts, feedback and reactions to the SANS Institute Healthcare Cyber Security Summit 2014 held last month in San Francisco. The holidays, end-of-year, and beginning-of-the-year craziness played a part, but it also required several team discussions to produce a concise wrap-up of the event because it covered so many topics.

The healthcare community needs to get active in SANS Institute’s events and programs. SANS Institute was created in 1989 as a cooperative research and education organization. The organization is focused on information security for all industries. However, SANS needs industry participation in order for that industry to benefit from its research and information-sharing programs. Most of the SANS healthcare community is made up of IT executives and professionals who started in the financial sector and have moved to healthcare in the past couple of years at some of the largest organizations – Kaiser Permanente, Aetna, etc. It’s a great start, and the recent summit, while only in its 2nd year, was a well-developed, well-organized event. But, SANS needs more participation from different healthcare organizations including smaller covered entities.

We asked the three members of our team who attended the conference to provide their top “take-aways” from the Summit.

“Stop focusing on compliance and start focusing on security”
This concept was repeated in several presentations, and for the most part, it is true. So many organizations and HIPAA Security Officers focus on whether or not they are in compliance with the regulation – documenting why they are not implementing an addressable standard like encryption – instead of securing the information that is at risk. That said, the presenters missed an important reality of healthcare information security: owners and management understand compliance; they don’t understand security. Until the healthcare community fears the cost of the breach more than the cost of a HIPAA fine, covered entities will spend money on “compliance” before they spend money on “security.” I would not recommend that a healthcare IT professional start his or her next presentation to the executive team with “Forget Compliance – Focus on Security!” any time soon.

“No one had a good answer when asked how small businesses could implement effective information security programs when most don’t even have a dedicated IT staff person”
Yes, our team asked several presenters and panelists how the majority of covered entities were supposed to implement the technology, tool and/or process being discussed when, according to Census.gov, 89% of healthcare businesses in the U.S. have less than 25 employees. The answers varied, from “use cloud technology,” from a cloud technology vendor; to “participate in the NH-IASC,” from a board member of the National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center. The most honest answer was from Rob Foster, Deputy Chief Information Officer and Acting Chief – Information Security, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Mr. Foster acknowledged that small covered entities would need to look outside their organization to consultants and other experts. We have to give the folks from HHS and ONC credit – they suffered many jabs at healthcare.gov, meaningful use and CMS with good humor and professionalism.

“Healthcare software and technology vendors are decades behind when it comes to security”
There was a panel of healthcare software and technology vendors from some of the most widely-used products, including McKesson and Siemens Healthcare. We were shocked at the level of self-congratulation these panelists had when they admitted that their software security initiatives were all less than five years old – some less than a year. They were seriously proud of the fact that they had implemented a formal software security process “last year.” There should have been a lot more heads hung in shame rather than pats on the back. Covered entities need to start demanding accountability from vendors on the security of their products, especially if you are entrusting your patient data to a cloud vendor. A business associate agreement is not enough – ask them specific questions about their risk analysis process, if they’ve had a third-party perform a penetration/vulnerability test on their software and infrastructure and if they have off-shore development teams.

“The healthcare community needs to get more involved with the information security community”
Jim Routh, CISO, Aetna & Board Member, NH-ISAC, used a common analogy about information security, “I don’t have to run faster than the bear; I just have to run faster than you.” The reality is that most covered entities don’t know that they are in the woods, not to mention the fact that they are supposed to be running from a bear. The healthcare industry is not the same as the financial industry and we need effective solutions to our industry’s problems. Until the healthcare industry commits to information security and is more active in the information security community, we aren’t going to get the same level of education, information and technology specific to our needs that is available to the financial industry.

In summary, the SANS Healthcare Cyber Security Summit was well worth the investment for our team; however, it highlighted a need for the healthcare industry to make information security a higher priority and get more involved in the information security community.

About Anna Drachenberg
Anna Drachenberg has more than 20 years in the software development and healthcare regulatory fields, having held management positions at Pacificare Secure Horizons, Apex Learning and the Food and Drug Administration. Anna co-founded HRM Services, Inc., (hipaarisk.com) a data security and compliance company for healthcare. HRM offers online risk management software for HIPAA compliance and provides consulting services for covered entities and business associates. HRM has clients nationwide and also partners with IT providers, medical associations and insurance companies. Anna is available via email at adrache@hipaarisk.com

Funny Patient Engagement Meme

Posted on January 11, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While I hear that diamonds aren’t required, I keep being told they make everything better.

Happy Weekend!

First Truly Gamified Health Sensor

Posted on January 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My favorite thing I saw at CES 2015 was the Valedo medical device for lower back health. To me, it shows the start of where I think mHealth needs to and will go as the sensors and apps become more highly developed.

In the current mobile health market, we have an increasingly mature set of sensor options available. They are doing a better and better job of sensing various health data. On the other side of the equation, we have more apps that are trying to gamify our health and wellness. Basically, they’re working to make being healthy and living well into a game that’s fun for everyone to do. One problem is that these two worlds currently don’t meet.

This is what made Valedo so interesting to me. They have an FDA cleared sensor tied together with a literal game app you can use with the sensor. If we look at the evolution of this, Wii Fit certainly was the first to popularize the idea of using sensors to get us healthy. Although, the fitness part always felt like more of a byproduct and clever marketing as opposed to the actual goal of the game designers.

Valedo has taken a different approach. They started with the health result in mind first: lower back pain and have applied a sensor and game to try and solve that problem. How do we know this is true? The Valedo is FDA cleared. Last I checked, the Wii Fit wasn’t FDA cleared.

Here’s a video (a bit dramatized I admit) look at how the Valedo works:

While I’d still like to have a Valedo of my own so I could see it’s actual impact and effectiveness, I think this approach is setting the standard for the type of digital health applications we’ll see in the future. The Valedo is just first of many examples where we’ll see sensors, gaming, and health come together in an amazing way.

A Video Look at the Digital Health, Fitness and Wellness Section of CES 2015

Posted on January 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After my initial CES Observations post, I’ve spent most of the time on some over the counter drugs and trying to stay warm in bed. Luckily I think I’m on the way out of whatever cold/flu/misery I had upon me. However, it kind of ruined many of my CES plans.

With that said, I did make some time to go and at least check out the Digital Health section of CES 2015. I wrote about the wearables explosion over on Smart Phone Healthcare and to illustrate some of what I describe in that post, I shot this video of the Digital Health exhibition space at CES. I was moving pretty fast to get through it in 12 minutes, but you’ll see a bunch of the brands and booths that were there along with a feeling for the event (Yes, tomorrow I need to go and investigate the steady cam options at the show.).

If you’ve been at CES or watching the coverage back home. What’s been most exciting, interesting, impressive, thought provoking, disappointing?

Ring in 2015 – Ring Out MD Myths about ICD-10

Posted on January 7, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Wendy Coplan-Gould, Founder and President of HRS Coding.

Physicians see ICD-10 as a mixed bag of distraction, expense and long-term advantages. They’ve heard grossly exaggerated messages about ICD-10’s complexity and cost. Confusion has led to complacency and obstinacy across physician practices and medical groups.

Conversely, some physician practices and medical groups eagerly await ICD-10’s ability to accurately describe their high-risk patients, improve data mining capabilities, and demonstrate complexity of cases. The opportunity for cleaner data, better quality scores and greater patient safety are three more physician-friendly benefits of ICD-10 as described in my previous ICD-10 post on EMR & HIPAA.

Recent research conducted with a 20-physician focus group, and presented during AHIMA’s 2014 Convention & Exhibit, revealed three common themes with regard to physician perceptions of ICD-10 and its effect on their practices.

Physicians are concerned about the following:

  • How specific their clinical documentation has to be for correct ICD-10 code assignment.
  • Obtaining accurate reimbursement under ICD-10.
  • Receiving ICD-10 training from the hospitals they serve.

With the advent of a new year, now is the time for hospitals and healthcare systems to dispel physician myths about ICD-10 and actively engage practices—one medical group at a time.

Five ICD-10 Realities and Physician Engagement Strategies

Is ICD-10 as difficult for doctors as once portrayed? The resounding answer for 2015 is “no.”

When introduced one physician office at a time, the implementation of ICD-10 is relatively easy. Consider these proven strategies to foster greater physician buy-in for ICD-10.

  • Most physicians will only use a small subset of ICD-10 codes—dramatically decreasing the amount of time required for training and preparation (1-2 days). Target training efforts toward the 80 percent of diagnosis and procedure codes that are used repeatedly within each practice or specialty.
  • When hospitals focus on improving EHR documentation templates, physicians are more productive, efficient and engaged in ICD-10 efforts. Foster inclusion by helping physicians build better documentation templates across all EHR applications.
  • Physicians learn best from other physicians. Find physician documentation champions within each specialty and make ICD-10 learning fun.
  • The best way to minimize claims denials and ensure proper reimbursement for both hospitals and physicians under ICD-10 will be the avoidance of non-specific codes. Focus on helping physicians document better and give them tools such as real-time documentation aides and prompts to create more succinct, accurate and complete clinical documentation.
  • Physician practices must also be included in end-to-end testing for ICD-10. Be sure to include them within your organization-wide testing plans. Even when testing is only for payer acknowledgement, it provides segue for physician practice coding and billing staff to practice submitting ICD-10 codes.

Blaze a New Path with Physicians in 2015

Last year left many hospitals feeling defeated regarding ICD-10 and their physician preparedness efforts. Money was spent and staff resources were exhausted. Congress dealt a devastating blow to ICD-10 budgets, timelines and implementation teams.

But the ship hasn’t sailed. There is still time to actively engage your medical staff in preparing for ICD-10. Erase your original message to physicians that ICD-10 is difficult and expensive. Replace it with knowledge gleaned over the past two years, recent physician research, and new implementation timelines based on specialty.

By focusing on the clinical data advantages of ICD-10 and bolstering physician productivity and efficiency, hospitals can blaze a new path toward the new code set—one practice at a time.

About Wendy Coplan-Gould
Wendy Coplan-Gould is the embodiment of HRS. She has led the HIM consulting and outsourcing company since 1979, through up and down economies and every significant regulatory twist and turn of the last three decades. Long-time clients and new clients alike are on a first-name basis with her and benefit from her focus on excellence, reliability and flexibility. She has been published in the Journal of AHIMA and other recognized publications, as well as conducted countless professional association presentations.

Prior to starting HRS, Wendy served as assistant director, then director, of Health Information Management at Baltimore City Hospital. She also was associate director of the Maryland Resource Center, which provided data for Maryland’s Health Services Cost Review Commission, an early adopter of the Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) methodology. Wendy is available via email: wendy@hrscoding.com.

EHR Computer Setup

Posted on January 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently had a doctors visit at a local quick care. When I go to these visits, it’s almost like work since I’m interested in what EHR they’re using and what they think of the EHR, meaningful use, government money, ICD-10, etc.

In this case, the organization had an EHR for half of the work they did, but were still on paper for the other half. However, they were switching all of their work over to a new EHR the next week. I think they told me they gave them a couple hours of training to learn the new system (good luck with that).

While I was waiting in the exam room, I saw this wall mounted computer setup (pictured below):

EHR Wall Computer Setup

Obviously you can tell that this wall mounted computer wasn’t being used yet. It must have come with the new EHR roll out. I’ll be interested to go back again in the future and see how this computer is used. I’m a big proponent of computers in the room. Plus, this looks like a pretty good setup that stays out of the way when needed. Although, I wonder if the ergonomics of this setup will catch up with the clinic.

How do you have the computers setup in your exam rooms? I’d love to hear what you’re doing or even see pictures of your exam room computer setup. Do you just use a tablet or laptop you carry around with you? Let’s see some more examples.