Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Samsung Invests Big in Virtual Reality at Facebook’s F8 Conference

Posted on April 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Ever since the CES conference earlier this year, I’ve been extremely interested in the virtual reality and augmented reality space. There’s a lot of potential for virtual reality in healthcare including in: training, diagnosing and treatment. Plus, I always remember that the best use cases for technology are often ones we can’t even imagine because of our own biases and constrained thinking. However, as we invest more in virtual reality, we’ll discover even better ways to apply the technology to healthcare.

This week Samsung and Facebook made a huge investment in virtual reality when they gave away a new Samsung Gear VR Headset and custom Galaxy smartphone to the 2600 developers attending Facebook’s F8 developer conference. That’s a lot of developers that will start building on top of this new virtual reality platform. I’ve already seen my healthcare developer friend post on social media about her kit. I’ll be interested to see what she creates.
Samsung Gear VR - Healthcare
I’ve certainly heard many of the naysayers talk about virtual reality. They argue that the early versions are expensive, require powerful computers, are tethered, require headsets and can cause headaches. These are all challenges, but most of them will be fixed as the technology evolves and matures. Plus, being healthcare I found the comment around headaches really interesting. I got headaches and eye strain from Google Glass, but I’ve never had an issue with virtual reality giving me a headache. It’s definitely something to watch though.

These challenges aside, I’ve found my experiences with virtual reality to be absolutely immersive. I totally lost myself in the experience and almost forgot the world around me. As I think back on that experience, I did realize that the key to an amazing experience was compelling content. If I was watching or doing something in a virtual world that wasn’t interesting, then you would have definitely lost me. Let that be a lesson to everyone in healthcare. You only get one chance to make a first impression on healthcare. Be sure that whatever healthcare virtual reality use case you’re working on has really compelling content. If you don’t, you’ll burn a whole generation of decision makers on virtual reality.

With this in mind, it’s going to be just as important for us to watch the virtual reality content creation space as the virtual reality display devices themselves. Can we make virtual reality content in a cost effective way? How hard will it be to create compelling content? Will the quality of the content be good enough to apply it to medicine?

These are all open questions I’ll be watching in the virtual reality space. However, given the impressive progressive we’ve seen over just the past couple years, I’m really excited by the possibilities. Healthcare better prepare for virtual reality based training and education. Soon enough your doctor will be diagnosing you using virtual reality and possibly from a remote destination. It’s not hard to imagine many treatment options being made available in a virtual reality environment.

Virtual reality in healthcare has some really incredible opportunities. I’m excited to see such a huge investment in virtual reality by both Samsung and Facebook. A lot of that innovation is going to trickle down into healthcare.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Healthcare in an E-Commerce World – Communication Solutions Series

Posted on April 14, 2016 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Laura Alabed-Olsson, Marketing Manager of Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter:@StericycleComms
Laura Alabed-Olsson
These days, it seems as though I can’t pickup an industry publication, or even a major daily newspaper, without finding at least one article on healthcare consumerism. Consumers want to shop for healthcare the way they shop for TVs and cars, they say. Consumers expect cost information, quality ratings and anytime access, too, they tell us.

All of this makes me wonder: For healthcare providers that have long operated in a traditional, not so consumer-centric world, where does one begin? Results from a handful of recent surveys offer some insights:

  1. More than 40% of consumers say that information found via social media affects the way they deal with their health.
  1. 77% of consumers use online reviews, often found on sites like Yelp and Healthgrades, as their first step in finding a new doctor.
  1. 56% of consumers have actively looked for healthcare cost information before getting care; 21% of these have compared prices across multiple providers.
  1. Consumers expect the same online service in healthcare that they see in other industries, and they will switch providers to get it.

So, let’s dig in.

Insight #1: 40% of consumers turn to social media for healthcare information. This statistic may not come as a surprise, especially when you consider the number of patients sitting in waiting rooms – or restaurants or coffee shops or wherever  – with phone in hand, endlessly scrolling Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.  What is surprising is how relatively few healthcare providers are pursuing this captive audience with educational content that accurately informs consumers about health-related issues (while simultaneously addressing demands for a “connected” experience). Is your organization leveraging social media to educate and engage with patients? Perhaps it should be.

Insight #2: 77% of consumers look to online reviews when choosing a provider. To further validate this point: Did you know that Healthgrades.com, the for-profit site that shares a variety of information about physicians, hospitals and other provider organizations, gets a million hits a day? Clearly, consumers have an appetite for information on patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. Is this information readily available on your organization’s website? If you don’t provide it, others will and, in doing so, they are poised to steer prospective patients elsewhere.

Insight #3: 56% of consumers are paying attention to healthcare costs. While the idea of comparison shopping for healthcare is a relatively new one, it’s one that consumers and providers alike must embrace (consumers, because they’re increasingly accountable for a greater share of out-of-pocket costs, and providers, because cost transparency is the new norm – and if you want to effectively compete with traditional providers, retail clinics, telemedicine, docs-on-demand and whatever comes next, you’ve just got to get onboard). Is your organization empowering patients to make thoughtful decisions? A cost estimator on your website – or even a promise to have cost information available when patients request it – could make for a great start.

Insight #4: Healthcare consumers want an online experience that mirrors what’s being offered by retailers like Amazon, Southwest Airlines and OpenTable. When consumers want to book an airline ticket or reserve a table at their favorite restaurant, they don’t have to pick up the phone and call between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. They hop online when it’s convenient for them and, in just a few clicks, they’ve gotten what they want. Why should healthcare be any different? By offering online self-scheduling on your website, you’re giving patients 24/7 access to care – and you’re doing it in a way that is familiar and convenient for them. Does your organization offer a way for consumers to access care when and how they want to? Research suggests it should.

Healthcare consumerism requires a significant shift in how providers serve patients, for sure. But in just a few, small steps – like those mentioned here – you can be on your way.

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality telephone answeringappointment scheduling, and automated communication services. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Health Data Sharing and Patient Centered Care with DataMotion Health

Posted on April 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Now that the HIMSS Haze has worn off, we thought we’d start sharing some of the great video interviews we did at HIMSS 2016. In this case, we did a 3 pack of interviews at the DataMotion Health booth where we got some amazing insights into health data sharing, engaging patients, and providing patient centered care.

First up is our chat with Dr. Peter Tippett, CEO of Healthcelerate and Co-Chairman of DataMotion Health, about the evolution of healthcare data sharing. Dr. Tippett offers some great insights into the challenge of structured vs unstructured data. He also talks about some of the subtleties of medicine that are often lost when trying to share data. Plus, you can’t talk with Dr. Tippett without some discussion of ensuring the privacy and security of health data.

Next up, we talked with Dennis Robbins, PHD, MPH, National Thought Leader and member of DataMotion Health’s Advisory Board, about the patient perspective on all this technology. He provides some great insights into patients’ interest in healthcare and how we need to treat them more like people than like patients. Dr. Robbins was a strong voice for the patient at HIMSS.

Finally we talked with Bob Janacek, Co-Founder and CTO of DataMotion Health, about the challenges associated with coordinating the entire care team in healthcare. The concept of the care team is becoming much more important in healthcare and making sure the care team is sharing the most accurate data is crucial to their success. Learn from Bob about the role Direct plays in this data sharing.

Thanks DataMotion Health for having us to your booth and having your experts share their insights with the healthcare IT community. I look forward to seeing you progress in your continued work to make health data sharing accessible, secure, and easy for healthcare organizations.

Small Practice Marketing Strategies Twitter Chat (#KareoChat)

Posted on April 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Health IT Marketing and PR Awards 2016

Last week we held the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference which is organized by Healthcare Scene. By all accounts, the conference ran well and the feedback I’ve gotten is that people really enjoyed the event and the healthcare marketing and PR community we’ve built. During the event, we held the HITMC Awards and Kareo won the award for Best Social Media Program. This is a well deserved honor since they put a lot of work into hosting the weekly #KareoChat.

Coming out of the conference, Kareo asked me if there were some topics from the conference that would work well for the #KareoChat audience of small practice physicians. After reviewing the sessions at the conference, I realized that there was a lot of lessons from the conference that could be applied to small practice marketing. In fact, so many of the topics could be a #KareoChat of their own. With that said, they asked if I’d host this week’s #KareoChat based on topics from the conference. So, I decided to pull together a potpourri of topics that applied well to small practices.

Kareo Chat - HITMC

Here’s a look at the topics for this week’s #KareoChat:

  1. When and why should a physician practice go through a rebranding? #KareoChat @HealthITMKTG
  2. How can you use your and your competitors’ online reviews (good and bad) to your benefit? #KareoChat @mdeiner
  3. Could small practices benefit from their own podcast? Is it worth it?  #KareoChat @GetSocialHealth @Resultant @jaredpiano
  4. How and when should small practices use visual content in their office? #KareoChat @csvishal2222
  5. How can the 4 communication preferences (Facts, Futures, Form, Feelings) help small physician practice marketing? #KareoChat @ChartCapture
  6. Where and how can we use the power of storytelling in small physician practice marketing? #KareoChat @ctrappe @stacygoebel

If you’d like to join us to discuss these topics, just follow the #KareoChat hashtag on Thursday, April 14th at Noon ET (9 AM PT). I expect it will be a really diverse and interesting chat across a wide variety of topics related to small practice marketing.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is an advertiser on one of the Healthcare Scene websites.

Over 2500 EMR and HIPAA Blog Posts

Posted on April 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I use to celebrate these milestones a lot more. Like any company, as you grow you forget to celebrate things. Not because you don’t care anymore, but because you’re not quite as hyper focused on the growth of your website. It’s too bad since it’s fun to celebrate.

With that in mind, I just realized that EMR and HIPAA hit a milestone of sorts: 2500 blog posts. Here’s the official numbers as of the writing of this blog post:

  • 2505 blog posts (this will be blog post #2506)
  • 16 official blog authors (many more guest bloggers)
  • 2070 blog posts written by Me
  • 10,215 comments
  • 1,456,541 spam comments blocked
  • 11,606,850 pageviews

For those keeping track at home, the full Healthcare Scene blog network just reached 9,884 blog posts. We’re going to have to plan an amazing celebration when we reach 10,000 blog posts!

When I first started EMR and HIPAA back in December 2005, I never thought I’d become a professional blogger. Even when I quit my day job April 1, 2010, I didn’t really think I’d be a full time blogger either. I quit to do my own startup company. However, the blogs kept growing and I was lucky to make blogging my profession.

I consider myself lucky to have ridden the wave of meaningful use incentive money for EHR. No one can argue that meaningful use didn’t push adoption of EHRs forward at an incredible rate. We’re now going to spend the next decade figuring out how to leverage all that data to benefit patients.

There’s plenty of challenges in healthcare, but there are plenty of opportunities as well. I still wake up every day excited to see what I’ll discover and how IT can impact a healthcare organization for good. Sure, it’s challenging when I see poorly thought out and poorly implemented EHR and health IT solutions harming an organization. It’s also frustrating to see some of the crazy things that we expect from healthcare. The double standards are brutal. However, the people inside healthcare more than make up for it’s ugly policies and perverse incentives.

This weekend at the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference Shahid Shah asked the audience if they’ve ever seen a more dramatic change in healthcare IT than we’ve seen in the past 5 years. The audience agreed that we’d seen really dramatic changes. Shahid then suggested that the next 5 years are going to make the previous 5 years look like nothing.

I’m excited that EMR and HIPAA will be along for the ride covering what’s interesting, new, unique, and innovative in healthcare IT. Plus, we’ll never forget to offer the practical, useful, and entertaining as well.

Thanks to all of you who have read EMR and HIPAA over the years and for those who have sponsored us as well. We feel lucky to be part of such an extraordinary industry that really can impact people’s lives for good.

The Real HIPAA Blog Series on Health IT Buzz

Posted on April 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re not familiar with the Health IT Buzz blog, it’s the Health IT blog that’s done by ONC (Office of the National Coordinator). I always love to see the government organizations blogging. No doubt they’re careful about what they post on their blog, but it still provides some great insights into ONC’s perspective on health IT and where they might take future regulations and government rules.

A great example of this is the Real HIPAA series of blog posts that they posted back in February. Yes, I realize I’m behind, but I’ll blame it on HIMSS.

Here’s an overview of the series:

It’s a common misconception that the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) makes it difficult, if not impossible, to move electronic health data when and where it is needed for patient care and health. This blog series and accompanying fact sheets aim to correct this misunderstanding so that health information is available when and where it is needed.

The blog series dives into the weeds a bit and so it won’t likely be read by the average doctor or nurse. However, it’s a great resource for HIPAA privacy officers, CIOs, CSOs, and others interested in healthcare interoperability. I can already see these blog posts being past around management teams as they discuss what data they’re allowed to share, with whom, and when.

What’s clear in the series is that ONC wants to communicate that HIPAA is meant to enable health data sharing and not discourage it. We all know people who have used HIPAA to stop sharing. We’ll see if we start seeing more people use it as a reason to share it with the right people at the right time and the right place.

Origami Inspired Medical Devices

Posted on April 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently came across some amazing technology that uses Origami to be able to make surgical tools so small that the incision needed for an operation could be much smaller. The work is being done by a group out of Brigham Young University in partnership with Intuitive Surgical, makers of the da Vinci Surgical robot. Here’s a video overview of the technology:

I love that the principles they used for NASA also apply to the medical field. Both fields want to take something that’s small and make it much larger. Although, the definition of “small” and “larger” are relative.

While we haven’t covered as many medical devices on this blog before, seeing inspirational things like this makes me think that maybe we should spend a lot more time learning about the innovations happening in this space.

You Might Have a Culture of Healthcare IT Security if…

Posted on April 6, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve often written that the key to really ensuring the security and privacy of data in healthcare, we need healthcare organizations to build a culture of security and privacy. It’s not just going to happen with a short term sprint.

So, I thought I’d have some fun and turn it into a list of ways for you to know if your organization has an organization of healthcare IT security or not.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…your chief security officer has power to influence change.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve spent time doing risk mitigation after your HIPAA risk assessment.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve found breaches in your system (Note that you found them as opposed to them finding you).

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve turned down a company because of their inability to show you security best practices.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve spent as much time on people as technology.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…someone other than your chief security officer or HIPAA committee has brought a security issue to your attention.

You might have a culture of healthcare IT security if…you’ve spent a sleepless night worrying about security at your organization.

I’m sure I’m missing some obvious things. Please add to the list in the comments.

Types of Healthcare IT Users

Posted on April 5, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As more and more healthcare IT is focused on patients, it’s interesting to think through the different types of users that exist in healthcare and how the technology needs to be able to adapt to all of those different use cases. However, I believe this is true in every industry.

For example, I’m currently sitting at the airport waiting for a flight. When I’m going through TSA at the airport or I’m waiting to board the plane I realize really quickly that there are a lot of different types of people boarding the plane. First, you have the group of high utilizers (usually business travelers) that travel all of the time. They have the process of going through the airport and boarding the plane down to a science. They have a specific rhythm that they’re use to experiencing and they move quickly through all of the processes.

The second group is the semi-utilizers. They’ve been on the plane enough to know the process and they’re more or less ready for what’s going to happen, but they’re still trying to remember some of the steps. They still listen to the announcements to make sure they’re ready for whatever is to come since they can’t remember all the details of the process.

The third group is the low utilizers. These are the people who have rarely flown. They don’t know what to expect and they don’t know how to work efficiently through the process. You can usually see the stress on their face as they battle their stuff, the announcements, and the process of taking a flight.

In most healthcare organizations we have a similar split. You have the high utilizers (we usually call them chronic patients) who know the doctors office process backwards and forwards. You have the people who’ve been to the doctors office quite a bit, but are still trying to remember the process of a doctor’s visit. Then, you have the people who almost never go to the doctor’s office and aren’t familiar with what to expect.

I’m sure we could dive into more of the details of each of these groups and their relationships. However, what I find interesting to note is that one of the best way to serve the high utilizers is to better service the low utilizers. There’s almost nothing worst to a high utilizer than to be thrown off your usual rhythm by someone who doesn’t know what they’re doing.

The other thing that’s important to recognize is that each class of healthcare IT user wants to be treated differently. The high utilizer wants to not be disrupted and for the workflow they’re use to doing to remain the same. The low utilizer wants to be led and informed through the process. If you sent all the information you share with a low utilizer to the high utilizer, they’ll be annoyed.

The problem with most healthcare IT is that they treat all patients the same way. Sure, we talk about personalized medicine, but how many healthcare organizations create a unique patient experience based on a patients utilization of there services? Of course, this is just one example, but it’s an important example of what needs to be done to take patient care to the next level.

What do you think of this breakout of patient types? Are there others you’d add? Are there health IT companies out there which are personalizing their services according to the patient’s utilization? Share your insights in the comments.

Breach Affecting 2.2M Patients Highlights New Health Data Threats

Posted on April 4, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A Fort Myers, FL-based cancer care organization is paying a massive price for a health data breach that exposed personal information on 2.2 million patients late last year. This incident is also shedding light on the growing vulnerability of non-hospital healthcare data, as you’ll see below.

Recently, 21st Century Oncology was forced to warn patients that an “unauthorized third party” had broken into one of its databases. Officials said that they had no evidence that medical records were accessed, but conceded that breached information may have included patient names Social Security numbers, insurance information and diagnosis and treatment data.

Notably, the cancer care chain — which operates on hundred and 45 centers in 17 states — didn’t learn about the breach until the FBI informed the company that it had happened.

Since that time, 21st Century has been faced with a broad range of legal consequences. Three lawsuits related to the breach have been filed against the company. All are alleging that the breach exposed them to a great possibility of harm.  Patient indignation seems to have been stoked, in part, because they did not learn about the breach until five months after it happened, allegedly at the request of investigating FBI officials.

“While more than 2.2 million 21st Century Oncology victims have sought out and/or pay for medical care from the company, thieves have been hard at work, stealing and using their hard-to-change Social Security numbers and highly sensitive medical information,” said plaintiff Rona Polovoy in her lawsuit.

Polovoy’s suit also contends that the company should have been better prepared for such breaches, given that it suffered a similar security lapse between October 2011 and August 2012, when an employee used patient names Social Security numbers and dates of birth to file fraudulent tax refund claims. She claims that the current lapse demonstrates that the company did little to clean up its cybersecurity act.

Another plaintiff, John Dickman, says that the breach has filled his life with needless anxiety. In his legal filings he says that he “now must engage in stringent monitoring of, among other things, his financial accounts, tax filings, and health insurance claims.”

All of this may be grimly entertaining if you aren’t the one whose data was exposed, but there’s more to this case than meets the eye. According to a cybersecurity specialist quoted in Infosecurity Magazine, the 21st Century network intrusion highlights how exposed healthcare organizations outside the hospital world are to data breaches.

I can’t help but agree with TrapX Security executive vice president Carl Wright, who told the magazine that skilled nursing facilities, dialysis centers, imaging centers, diagnostic labs, surgical centers and cancer treatment facilities like 21st are all in network intruders’ crosshairs. Not only that, he notes that large extended healthcare networks such as accountable care organizations are vulnerable.

And that’s a really scary thought. While he doesn’t say so specifically, it’s logical to assume that the more unrelated partners you weld together across disparate networks, it multiplies the number of security-related points of failure. Isn’t it lovely how security threats emerge to meet every advance in healthcare?