Columbia-Affiliated Physician Group Plans Rollout Of Mobile Engagement Platform

Posted on December 15, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A massive multispecialty medical practice associated with Columbia University has decided to implement a mobile patient engagement platform, as part of a larger strategy aimed at boosting patient satisfaction and ease of access to care.

The vendor behind the technology, HealthGrid, describes its platform as offering the physicians the ability to “provide actionable care coordination, access to critical health information and to enable [patient] self-care management.” HealthGrid also says that its platform will help the group comply with the requirements of Meaningful Use and MIPS.

The group, ColumbiaDoctors, includes more than 1,700 physicians, surgeons, dentists and nurses, and offers more than 230 specialty and subspecialty areas of care. All of the group’s clinicians are affiliated with New York-Presbyterian hospital and serve as faculty at Columbia University Medical Center.

The group is investing heavily in making its services more accessible and patient-friendly. In April, for example, ColumbiaDoctors agreed to roll out the DocASAP platform, which is designed to offer patients advanced online scheduling capabilities, including features allowing patients to find and book patients via mobile and desktop channels, tools helping patients find the best provider for their needs and analytics tools for business process improvement.

HealthGrid, for its part, describes itself as a CRM platform whose goal is to “meet patients where they are.” The vendor has developed a rules engine, based on clinical protocols, that connects with patients at key points in the care process. This includes reaching out to patients regarding needed appointments, education, medications and screening, both before and after they get care. The system also allows patients to pay their co-pays via mobile channels.

Its other features include automated mobile check-in – with demographic information auto-populated from the EMR – which patients can update from their mobile phones. The platform allows patients to read, update and sign off on forms such as HIPAA documentation and health information using any device.

While I’d never heard of HealthGrid before, it sounds like it has all the right ideas in place for consumer engagement. Clearly it impressed ColumbiaDoctors, which must be spending a fair amount on its latest addition. I’m sure the group’s leaders feel that if it increases patient alignment with treatment goals and improves the condition of the population it serves, they’ll come out ahead.

But the truth is, I don’t think anyone knows yet whether health organizations can meet big population health goals by interacting more with patients or spending more time in dusty back rooms fussing over big data analytics. To be sure, if you have enough money to spend they can both reach out directly to patients and invest heavily in next-generation big data infrastructure. However, my instinct is that very few institutions can focus on both simultaneously.

Without a doubt, sophisticated health IT leaders know that it pays to take smart chances, and ColumbiaDoctors is probably wise to pick its spot rather than play catch-up. Still, it’s a big risk as well. I’ll be most eager to see whether tools like HealthGrid actually impact patients enough to be worth the expense.