9 responses

  1. Aaron Berdofe
    August 10, 2015

    It’s an interesting question, but unfortunately the EHR vendors would never allow it. They still think people will copy their systems or something illogical like that. I have a number of consultants or would-be consultants ask me quite often how they can get certification in Vendor X and I have to explain to them the loop which keeps them out.

  2. Catherine Huddle
    August 11, 2015

    John, We have a program for education, Sevocity U. The system is free for the instructors and up to 20 concurrent student users. There is a nominal per user fee for users over the twentieth. For this program the system cannot be used to see live patients, only for educational purposes.

    For more information: http://www.sevocity.com/educators
    or email EHReducation@Sevocity.com

  3. Anthony Subbiah
    August 11, 2015

    Sorry – not have been in touch recently; good post. Yes; the in-patient EHR’s may not be as welcoming of outsiders, especially students/lecturers/schools having full access to their system. And I see the pain of getting through to EPIC; probably Cerner is better bet.

    I see it as a two part course wherein the schools might want to focus on Ambulatory EHR and PMS in its entirety for Year 1 and go to the in-patient EHR for Year 2. That might give them the lead of an year to work with the likes of Cerner to get the necessary approvals and also train the trainers.

    More than happy to assist any of the colleges wanting to use the Ambulatory EHR for their students education and training. Cheers

  4. Anthony Subbiah
    August 11, 2015

    Yes; the in-patient EHR’s may not be as welcoming of outsiders, especially students/lecturers/schools having full access to their system. And I see the pain of getting through to EPIC; probably Cerner is better bet.

    I see it as a two part course wherein the schools might want to focus on Ambulatory EHR and PMS in its entirety for Year 1 and go to the in-patient EHR for Year 2. That might give them the lead of an year to work with the likes of Cerner to get the necessary approvals and also train the trainers.

    More than happy to assist any of the colleges wanting to use the Ambulatory EHR for their students education and training. Cheers

  5. Megan
    August 11, 2015

    I’m not as familiar with the education process for Cerner, but I personally experienced the education hurdles with Epic. It’s incredibly modular – I hold several Epic builder certifications, and learning how to use Epic Inpatient is very little like using Ambulatory or ASAP (ED). Point being, how valuable is one certification, or education of one module? Hard to answer. I agree with Anthony Subbiah – start with Ambulatory, and you’ll at least obtain the backbone.

    Epic doesn’t hand out certifications like candy, likely a factor why they are so valuable. I, too, worry about a course that delivered certifications but lacked a full health bachelors degree.

    Finally, I think you’d be asking a giant like Epic to tailor their certification process – what skills do you want your students to walk away with? I’m not sure the current certification process is the answer!

  6. Tony McCormick
    August 11, 2015

    OpenEMR (open-emr.org) is not just available but being heavily used in many education environments for ambulatory care classes. Notably University of Texas uses it heavily in lots of different ways.

    OHSU uses Epic and VistA. Many community colleges are using both those and Practice Fusion for HIT training and certification.

  7. John Lynn
    August 11, 2015

    Aaron,
    You’re right about many fearing that someone will “steal” something from their software. It’s just ridiculous since if an EHR vendor wants access to another EHR vendors software, they’ll find a way. I know. I’ve seen it.

    Catherine,
    Thanks for sharing. I’ll forward your note on to my contact.

    Anthony,
    Welcome back! You’ve been missed. It’s not a bad strategy to start with ambulatory and then do in-patient in year 2. Although, many people are just trying to get 1 EHR incorporated into education.

    Megan,
    I think most people want their students to get a job. An Epic or Cerner certification would certainly open a lot of doors in that regard.

    Tony,
    Good to hear. I should have mentioned them as well as Vista. Being open source of course they can use it. I’m glad to hear that many are using it.

  8. R Troy
    August 11, 2015

    John, you may recall that I wrote hear about my frustration with the Federally sponsored HealthIT training, whose only hands on with an EHR was a few hours with the (downloadable) demo of Vista CPRS at home, and actually ‘loading it’ in a college lab. This training that the Feds paid for led absolutely nowhere. I’d suggested that it would have been better if the institutions doing these courses could have worked with local hospitals to get internships, though I’m not sure that the EHR vendors like EPIC would even allow HealthIT interns at a hospital to use their software (regardless of training level and real world experience of those involved).

    My feeling is that by making it so hard to get trained, the vendors help maintain a share of the EHR consulting market. Which of course makes the cost of implementing and maintaining an ERH so much more expensive that it really needs to be.

  9. John Lynn
    August 12, 2015

    R Troy,
    Are you saying that Epic opening its own consulting services is a way for them to make more money in an environment where they’ve driven up the price for such consulting services?

Back to top
mobile desktop