What Value Does a Healthy Patient Get from a PHR?

Posted on November 11, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my previous post about a Patient Controlled Medical Record, I asserted that such a thing would be a challenge to get to work in the US, but that there was a lot of potential internationally. I did provide one caveat when it came to chronic patients where I think there is potential in the US as well. Although, some argued against even that group being interested in the comments.

Let me further expound on why I think the patient controlled medical record fails for a healthy patient (and this includes people who think they’re healthy, or at least relatively healthy…ie. they don’t go to a doctor for any chronic condition). In many respects this is my talking from my own personal perspective as a young, healthy adult (although I guess all of those descriptors could be argued).

The problem for someone that’s healthy is that their medical record basically has no data. The reason you want a patient controlled medical record is so that you can extract value from the data. I don’t need to look at my online medical record to see that I don’t have any drug allergies, that I had a cold or flu 3 years ago, that I got my flu shot 4 years ago, and that when I was 15 I had a hernia operation.

The point being that my medical record is so short that there’s so little value in me trying to aggregate that record in once place. What value do I get from doing so?

I think there could be value in doing so, but not today. For example, if by keeping a patient controlled medical record I could avoid filling out the crazy stack of paperwork that’s given you at every new doctor you visit, I and every other patient would want to keep an online patient record. This should be a solvable problem, but I won’t go into the hundreds of systemic reasons why it’s not going to happen anytime soon. Although, we’ll start with the doctor preferring your allergies to be in the upper right corner in red. Now scale that request up to 700,000 doctors.

Similar to the above item, there are other ancillary functions (ie. appointment scheduling, prescription refills, message your doctor, etc.) that could be tied to your medical record that would make people want to use a PHR or other similar system. However, most people would use it for the ancillary functions and not to be able to control their medical record in one place. For many of the ancillary services this portal will need to be tethered to a PHR.

One trend that I hope will change my description above is the wave of new health sensors that are hitting the market. As those health sensors get better I believe we’ll see a new type of portal that is attractive for even a “healthy” person to visit. This concept coincides with what I call Treating a Healthy Patient. All of this new sensor data could make it worth my time as someone who thinks I’m healthy to check and aggregate my data in one location. The volume of data available would be much more than what I have stored in my memory and so it will make sense for me to visit somewhere that stores and processes my whole medical record.

How these portals full of health sensor data will work with doctors is a topic for another blog post. Until then, I’ll be surprised how many healthy patients really get on board collecting their patient data in a patient controlled medical record.