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Value Based Reimbursement Research Results in Time for #AHIPInstitute

Posted on June 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

McKesson Health Solutions has commissioned a new National Research study on Value Based Reimbursement. Here’s a quick summary of some of the findings:

The rapid pace of change in healthcare payment continues unabated, with payers reporting they are 58% along the continuum towards full value-based reimbursement, a 10% leap since 2014. Hospitals aren’t far behind, reporting they’re now 50% along the value continuum, up 4% in the past two years.

Those numbers were a bit shocking to me. It doesn’t feel like we’ve gotten that far in the shift to value based reimbursement. Does it feel like it to you? I knew we were headed that direction, but definitely thought we had just begun. These numbers paint a much different story.

This week I’m excited to attend my first AHIP Institute. I’ll be exploring this shift in all its gory details.

Along with this study and with AHIP starting tomorrow, McKesson has been sharing a number of cartoons about the healthcare industry. Here are a few of them they tweeted out:

Healthcare Costs

Healthcare Payment Pathway

Healthcare Execs Want To Collect More From Patients

Posted on May 26, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Every healthcare provider wants to get paid, of course. However, collecting the ever-growing portion of revenue that patients owe is tough, and getting tougher. That being said, the majority of providers recognize that they have a big problem and are working to boost the volume and speed of patient payments, a new study finds.

The study, which is sponsored by claims management and patient payments vendor Navicure in affiliation with Porter Research, connected with 300 of professionals, including practice administrators (36%), C-suite executives (25%) and billing managers (35%). Forty-one percent of organizations had 1 to 10 providers, 31% had 11 to 50 providers, 12% had 51 to 100 providers and 17% had more than 100 providers.

In responding to the survey, 63% of survey respondents said that patient payment processes were a high priority for their leadership teams. Their challenges in collecting from patients included patients’ inability to pay (31%), difficulty educating patients about the financial responsibility (26%) and slow-paying patients (25%).

It’s not surprising that collecting patient payments is a priority for many organizations. The study found that patient payment revenue made up 11% to 20% of total revenue for almost a third of organizations that responded. Twenty percent of organizations said patient payments accounted for 21% to 30% of total revenue, and for 23%, patient payments accounted for more than 31% of total revenue.

More than half (57%) of respondents said they educate patients about their financial responsibility, but only 42% said they always estimate the patient’s cost at the time of service. What’s more, few have implemented steps that might streamline payment. Sixty-two percent do not offer credit card on file programs, 52% don’t have automated payment plans in place, and 57% don’t send electronic statements to patients.

To address these issues, Navicure recommends that providers make several changes in their patient payment processes. These include viewing patients’ eligibility information prior to or at the time of service, collecting copays and outstanding balances, creating care estimates and enrolling patients in any available payment plans.

While the survey doesn’t address this issue directly, it also doesn’t hurt to make bills more readable. I’ve read accounts of some hospital billing departments and medical office staffers spending hours on the phone with patients going over charges. Not only does this frustrate the patients, and undermine their relationship with your organization, it wastes a lot of time. Cleaning up bill formats can go a long way toward smoothing out routine payment issues.

On that note, it probably makes sense to roll out patient-friendly billing technologies. More than 70% of respondents who have replaced paper statements with online bill payment and e-statements would recommend this technology to a peer, and 42% of respondents using automated payment plans were very or completely satisfied.

Ultimately, however, collecting more from patients probably calls for changes in policy, the research suggests. While 35% ask for a partial deposit before service, and 26% collect all of what a patient owes before service, 18% of respondents said they didn’t collect anything before prior to service, and 21% said they didn’t charge until claims were processed.

Time To Leverage EHR Data Analytics

Posted on May 5, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

For many healthcare organizations, implementing an EHR has been one of the largest IT projects they’ve ever undertaken. And during that implementation, most have decided to focus on meeting Meaningful Use requirements, while keeping their projects on time and on budget.

But it’s not good to stay in emergency mode forever. So at least for providers that have finished the bulk of their initial implementation, it may be time to pay attention to issues that were left behind in the rush to complete the EHR rollout.

According to a recent report by PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Advanced Risk & Compliance Analytics practice, it’s time for healthcare organizations to focus on a new set of EHR data analytics approaches. PwC argues that there is significant opportunity to boost the value of EHR implementations by using advanced analytics for pre-live testing and post-live monitoring. Steps it suggests include the following:

  • Go beyond sample testing: While typical EHR implementation testing strategies look at the underlying systems build and all records, that may not be enough, as build efforts may remain incomplete. Also, end-user workflow specific testing may be occurring simultaneously. Consider using new data mining, visualization analytics tools to conduct more thorough tests and spot trends.
  • Conduct real-time surveillance: Use data analytics programs to review upstream and downstream EHR workflows to find gaps, inefficiencies and other issues. This allows providers to design analytic programs using existing technology architecture.
  • Find RCM inefficiencies: Rather than relying on static EHR revenue cycle reports, which make it hard to identify root causes of trends and concerns, conduct interactive assessment of RCM issues. By creating dashboards with drill-down capabilities, providers can increase collections by scoring patients invoices, prioritizing patient invoices with the highest scores and calculating the bottom-line impact of missing payments.
  • Build a continuously-monitored compliance program: Use a risk-based approach to data sampling and drill-down testing. Analytics tools can allow providers to review multiple data sources under one dashboard identify high-risk patterns in critical areas such as billing.

It’s worth noting, at this point, that while these goals seem worthy, only a small percentage of providers have the resources to create and manage such programs. Sure, vendors will probably tell you that they can pop a solution in place that will get all the work done, but that’s seldom the case in reality. Not only that, a surprising number of providers are still unhappy with their existing EHR, and are now living in replacing those systems despite the cost. So we’re hardly at the “stop and take a breath” stage in most cases.

That being said, it’s certainly time for providers to get out of whatever defensive crouch they’ve been in and get proactive. For example, it certainly would be great to leverage EHRs as tools for revenue cycle enhancement, rather than the absolute revenue drain they’ve been in the past. PwC’s suggestions certainly offer a useful look on where to go from here. That is, if providers’ efforts don’t get hijacked by MACRA.

The Shifting Health Care IT Markets

Posted on November 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m at the end of my Fall Healthcare IT Conference season (although I’m still considering attending RSNA for my first time) and besides being thankful to be done with all the travel, I’m also taking a second to think about what I’ve learned over the past couple months as I’ve traveled to a wide variety of conferences.

While the EHR market has been hot for so many years, I’m seeing a big shift in purchasing to three areas: Analytics/Population Health, Revenue Cycle Management, and Privacy/Security. This isn’t a big surprise, but the EHR market has basically matured and now even EHR vendors are looking at new ways to market their products. These are the three main areas where I see the market evolving.

Analytics and Population Health
I could have easily added the other buzzword “patient engagement” to this category as well. There’s a whole mixture of technologies and approaches for this category of healthcare IT. In fact, it’s where I see some of the most exciting innovations in healthcare. Most of it is driven by some form of value based reimbursement or organizations efforts to prepare for the shift to value based reimbursement. However, there’s also a great interest by many organizations to try and extract value from their EHR investment. Many are betting on these tools being able to help them realize value from their EHR data.

Revenue Cycle Management
We’re seeing a whole suite of revenue cycle solutions. For many years we’ve seen solutions that optimized an organization’s relationships with payers. Those are still popular since it seems like most organizations never really fix the problem so their need for revenue cycle management is cyclical. Along with these payer solutions, we’re seeing a whole suite of products and companies that are focused on patient payment solutions. This shift has been riding the wave of high deductible plans in healthcare. As an organization’s patient pay increases, they’re looking for better ways to collect the patient portion of the bill.

Privacy and Security
There have been so many health care breaches, it’s hard to even keep up. Are we becoming numb to them? Maybe, but I still see many organizations investing in various privacy and security programs and tools whenever they hear about another breach. Plus, the meaningful use requirement to do a HIPAA Risk Assessment has built an entire industry focused on those risk assessments. You can be sure the coming HIPAA audits will accelerate those businesses even more.

What other areas are you seeing become popular in health care IT?

7 Strategies for Revenue Cycle Management Success

Posted on August 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I came across a whitepaper called 7 Strategies for Revenue Cycle Management Success. I continue to be amazed by how many practices can benefit from better revenue cycle management. So much so that hundreds of companies thrive on the back of a practice’s revenue. This is true for a number of EHR companies as well.

For those who don’t want to download the full whitepaper with all the details on the 7 strategies, here’s the list:

Strategy #1: Monitor Payments
Strategy #2: Perform Financial Clearance
Strategy #3: Collect from Patients
Strategy #4: Manage Denials
Strategy #5: Establish Employee Expectations
Strategy #6: Avoid the Snowball Effect
Strategy #7: Report on Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

As I look through this list and read through the whitepaper, all of it just points to quality management of processes. There’s nothing on the list that’s rocket science. It’s just taking the time and effort to make sure that all of your practice’s processes are well organized and thorough. As you can imagine, that’s a problem for many organizations. That’s why so many practices outsource this work to another company.

When I consider where revenue cycle management is headed, I wonder how these new value based reimbursement models will impact revenue cycle management companies. My guess is that many of them will just see it as the same process applied to new clinical values and measures. However, I think that value based reimbursement is going to require companies to go much deeper with a practice. If the practice is now responsible for a population of users and not just the ones they’ve seen in their office, that’s going to take a very different skill set.

What is clear to me is that many practices are going to need some help from an outside company even in a value based reimbursement environment. I’m just not sure which companies will be providing those services.

Five Commonly Overlooked ICD-10 IT Transition Strategies

Posted on December 1, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Daniel M. Flanagan, Executive Consultant, Beacon Partners.
Daniel M. Flanagan, Executive Consultant, Beacon Partners
While some organizations have relaxed their approach to ICD-10 readiness given the October 1, 2015 extension, recent polls show that the majority of healthcare organizations remain woefully unprepared.  About 60% of healthcare systems and 96% of physician practices have not begun end-to-end testing according to recent surveys conducted by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and Navicure, a leading claims clearinghouse. A lack of testing puts the ICD-10 transition at the greatest risk of failure.

ICD-10 readiness planning should remain a top priority because conducting a comprehensive gap analysis and the resulting remediation work will correct system vulnerabilities that will improve revenue cycle performance today.  However, systems performance improvement is time and resource-intensive and cannot be achieved at the last minute.

Below are five often overlooked transition planning steps:

  1. Update and complete your IT system inventory. We have helped several healthcare organizations prepare for ICD-10 and a common vulnerability is the absence of a complete and accurate IT inventory. Nearly one-third of organizations do not keep an inventory, and, of those that do, most are inaccurate. Many contain systems that are no longer in use and fail to reflect new or recently upgraded applications. Only a few organizations have had a complete IT inventory that accurately reflects all systems requiring end-to-end testing.  We often discover code-sensitive “orphan” applications and systems implemented by end-users without the IT department’s review and approval, which must be added to the inventory. An accurate IT inventory is critical to determine the extent of testing required, and to budget the time and expense needed to complete it.
  1. Review the number and functionality of all interfaces. Revenue cycle interfaces often contain the most critical code processing gaps and represent an organization’s greatest transition risk. For example, workflow analysis sometimes reveals unreliable processing of ICD-9 codes by billing system or other interfaces.  Extensive remediation is needed after the readiness assessment is completed in such cases.  Highly unreliable manual systems are also often used to process code, which impacts work that should be handled electronically. When conducting a workflow analysis, we sometimes find that experienced revenue cycle system end-users disagree about the design and functionality of long-standing systems and interfaces. Friction can arise between end-users and IT application specialists when interfaces do not work or appear not to work properly. Such issues can often be resolved quickly and objectively when a workflow analysis is performed early in the readiness planning process.
  1. Enlist the support of system end-users early to identify performance gaps and devise solutions. Readiness requires that any system that stores, processes, or uses diagnosis codes be identified and tested. However, it is easy to overlook some important performance gaps. In the majority of cases, end-users can readily identify performance gaps and recommend potential, practical solutions.  End-users can also be valuable in identifying potential solutions.  Involving end-users as early as possible in transition planning can avert wasted time.  For instance CDI, case management, as well as QA operating and reporting systems are heavily code-driven, but can be tough to “see,” especially if work is performed on paper. Enlisting end-users to identify code-impacted systems is a great way to ensure nothing is missed.
  1. Set a date to begin testing and verify that payers, clearinghouses, IT vendors, and others tied to your revenue cycle are ICD-10 compliant. End-to-end testing is vital to confirm ICD-10 readiness. Without testing, problem areas are not recognized and will not get fixed, which places the transition at the greatest of failure. Request that each payer and vendor confirm system compliance in writing and set a date when testing will begin.  In addition, we always recommend that our clients call and, if possible, visit key payers to confirm their readiness.   A payer’s inability to commit to a testing date is a warning sign that warrants immediate follow-up.
  1. Align transition efforts and resources with top priority goals. Transition planning will highlight performance improvement opportunities across a range of systems — including IT, revenue cycle, clinical documentation, quality assurance, and EMR.  The variety of performance improvement opportunities sometimes results in an organization creating more goals than needed for a successful transition. Supplemental initiatives can be overwhelming to achieve with restricted resources in a limited timeframe.  The key is to identify “mission critical” transition objectives and allocate scarce resources accordingly.  Define clear objectives and create a detailed plan to monitor progress for achieving each goal.  For example:
    • Revenue cycle performance: Create benchmarks and dashboards for Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that routinely report system performance now and after ICD-10 go-live.
    • IT: Validate system interfaces and upgrades, and perform testing to ensure confirmation of claim submission data flow. Testing results will provide valuable guidance to remediation efforts.
    • Clinical documentation: Establish a Clinical Documentation Improvement Program (CDIP) to audit provider documentation and coding. The initiative should be designed to provide ongoing training, as well as measure progress while ensuring data integrity, medical necessity, and billing compliance.

Although the deadline may have shifted, healthcare organizations need to stay on track to make the necessary IT and systems changes needed to optimize performance now and in the future.

About Daniel M. Flanagan
Daniel M. Flanagan is a seasoned healthcare executive with 28 years of leadership experience in the health system, physician practice and managed care fields. His primary interest has been performance improvement, especially in revenue cycle operations, improvement plan development and implementation and strategic planning, budgeting and implementation. Mr. Flanagan understands the challenges posed by today’s environment and is experienced in helping clients identify and capitalize upon opportunities to improve organizational performance.

Study: Doctors Favor Integrated EMR, Practice Management System

Posted on September 13, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

While large institutions may not be jumping onto cloud-based technologies — or admitting it, in any event — the majority of doctors in a new Black Book survey are gung-ho on cloud solutions to their revenue cycle management dilemmas, according to a new piece in Healthcare IT News.

A new Black Book study, “Top Physician Practice Management & Revenue Cycle Management: Ambulatory EHR Vendors,” surveyed more than 8,000 CFOs, CIOs, administrators and support staff for hospitals and medical practices.

The research has concluded that 87 percent of all medical practices agree that their billing and collections systems need to be upgraded, HIN reports. And the majority of those physicians are in favor of moving to an integrated practice management, EMR and medical software product, Black Book concluded.

According to Black Book rankings, the revenue cycle management software and services industry just crossed the $12 billion mark, pushed up by reimbursement and payment reforms, accountable care trends, ICD-10 and declining revenues.

Forty-two percent of doctors surveyed said that they’re thinking about upgrading their RCM software within the next six to 12 months. And 92 percent of those seeking an RCM practice management upgrade are only planning to consider an app that includes an EMR, Healthcare IT News said.

It’s no coincidence that  doctors are trading up on financial tools. Doctors are playing catch-up financially in a big way, with 72 percent of  practices reporting that they anticipate declining to negative profitability in 2014 due to inefficient billing and records technology as well as diminishing reimbursements. (On the other hand, it’s not clear why doctors aren’t still seeking best-of-breed on both the EMR and PM side.)

While selecting an integrated PM/EMR system may work well for practices, it’s going to impose problems of its own, including but not limited to finding a system in which both sides are a tight fit with practice needs. It will be interesting to see whether doctors actually follow through with their PM/EMR buying plans once they dig in deep and really study their options.

Improving Financial Performance By Accelerating Cash Flow

Posted on July 24, 2013 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In IT circles, revenue cycle management isn’t the sexiest assignment, but collecting revenue is the lifeblood of your hospital nonetheless. In this e-book, Relay Health offers several suggestions for speeding up cash flow by being proactive about when and where cash is collected.

Right now, as the book notes, hospitals rely on collecting co-pays at the time of service, while determining and collecting the balance post-service. However, the likelihood of patients paying goes down after they leave the hospital.

To address collections pre-service, Relay Health suggests hospitals use technology to screen patients for eligibility for benefits and their propensity to pay bills, verify their personal data and identity information to avoid fraud and speed the claims process, and screen them for charity assistance.

There’s also several steps the e-book recommends which can increase the propensity of patients to pay post-discharge, including leveraging patient data to customize statements with relevant messages; using visually-appealing statement formats; offering online bill  payment and management; and integrating an estimation/verification tool to help focus the discussion of patient responsibility.

Another important step  hospitals can take is to evaluate their claims management processes and shift effort to areas where the greatest impact can be felt, the book suggests.  As of the first half of 2012,  the average service-to-payment velocity industry wide was 45.3 days from patient discharge to resolution. This can be helped by finding process delays in key areas of claims performance, including service to release of claim, service to submission of claim, submit to Transmit and Transmit to Payment, Relay Health suggests.

Still another way in which hospitals can improve their revenue cycle management performance is to engage in comparative analytics, benchmarking their financial performance to improve decision-making.  The e-book notes that while traditional benchmarking presents several issues — not the least of which being that comparing performance indicators between organizations may be an “apples to oranges” comparison — benchmarking using comparative analytics avoids these issues.

Ultimately, the e-book notes, healthcare providers will transition from a focus on internal data repositories for performance information to a more outward-facing, patient-centric model integrating data from claims, EMRs, PHRs, analytics technologies, CRM systems and health insurance exchanges. In the mean time,  it suggests, it’s definitely worth the effort to fine-tune RCM systems using the data you have.

Where is the Value in Health IT?

Posted on August 10, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What a powerful question that I think hasn’t got enough attention. Everyone seems to be so enamored with EHR thanks to the $36 billion in EHR incentive money. I seem to not be an exception to that rule as well. Although, at least I was in love with EHR well before the government started spending money on it.

While so many are distracted by the government money I think it’s worth asking the question of where the value is in healthcare IT.

Practice Management software has a ton of billing benefits. Is there a practice out there that doesn’t use some sort of practice management software? I don’t know of any.

Health Information Exchange (HIE) has a ton of value for reducing duplicate tests. Certainly we have challenges actually implementing an HIE, but the value in reducing healthcare costs and improving patient care seems quite clear. Having the best information about someone clearly leads to better healthcare.

Data Warehouse and Revenue Cycle Management (RCM) has tremendous value. RCM is not really sexy, but after attending a conference like ANI you can see how much money is on the table if you deal with revenue integrity. I add data warehouse in this category since they’re often very closely tied together.

Since this is an EHR site, where then does EHR fit into all this? What are the really transparent benefit of using an EHR. I know there are a whole list of EHR benefits. However, I think it is a challenge for many doctors to see how all of those benefits add up. EHR adoption would be much higher if there was one big hair benefit to EHR adoption. Unfortunately, I don’t yet think there’s one EHR benefit that’s yet reached that level of impact. I hope one day it will. Not that it matters right now anyway. Most practices wouldn’t see the benefit between the EHR incentive weeds.

The Real Money is in the ACO, Not Meaningful Use

Posted on May 24, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

John Moore from Chilmark Research offers this great insight for those of us in the healthcare IT and EHR industry:

The MU requirements have become little more than a “spec-sheet” for vendors, consultants and IT shops and departments. These requirements have nothing to do with innovation and have little to do with the dramatic changes that will occur in this industry in the next decade. Quoting that oft-used phrase, “follow the money” one can quickly see that the billions in funding for incentivizing providers to adopt EHRs under the HITECH Act is relative chump change to the dramatic fortunes that may be won or lost under the new value-based payment models that are proliferating throughout the industry – payment models that commonly fall under the rubric of ACO or PCMH. In each of these models, EHRs are important to a degree, they are part of the basic infrastructure. But it is what one does with the data that matters (collect, communicate, collaborate, synthesize, analyze, measure and improve). Therefore, if you want to see innovation look beyond today and the tactical push to effectively adopt and meaningfully use EHRs and towards the future of how that data will be used to drive quality improvements, better outcomes and lowering risk exposure.

As the title says, I translate this to mean: The Real Money is in the ACO (Accountable Care Organizations), Not Meaningful Use

Of course, his description of the current healthcare IT landscape also reminds me of two posts I did previously: EHR is the Database of Healthcare and Is Revenue Cycle Management Sexy?

Both of those posts highlight many of the the observations that John Moore makes. First, if the EHR is nothing more than a repository of data, then it has value (Oracle did pretty well as a database) but it’s limited. Those who can take the data stored in EHR and other healthcare data sources and do something amazing with it are going to be the big winners in healthcare IT. Could an EHR vendor be the one to do this? Possibly, but looking at other industries, I think this is unlikely. That’s why I describe EHR’s similar to databases.

The answer to the question posed in the second post linked above is “Yes, if you like money.” Sure, healthcare isn’t all about money, but money can be a tremendous driving force for doing good as well. It turns out that dealing with revenue cycle problems provides tremendous value to a clinic. However, many people for some reason look past it since they think it’s not “sexy.”

The ACO model that is fast approaching is also going to make this even more important. It’s still too early to describe exactly how it’s all going to play out, but many who don’t have a handle on the business side of their practice are going to miss out.

I’ve heard some describe meaningful use as a high bar to achieve. I disagree. Meaningful use is prescriptive and simple for EHR software to achieve. Sure, it takes some time and effort, but any one with time and effort can achieve it. I don’t think we’ll be able to say the same for ACOs. That’s why the value of the ACO is going to be much higher than meaningful use. It’s the traditional higher risk leads to higher reward.