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Study Offers Snapshot Of Provider App Preferences

Posted on March 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A recent study backed by HIT industry researchers and an ONC-backed health tech project offers an interesting window into how healthcare organizations see freestanding health apps. The research, by KLAS and the SMART Health IT Project, suggests that providers are developing an increasingly clear of what apps they’d like to see and how they’d use them.

Readers of this blog won’t be surprised to hear that it’s still early in the game for healthcare app use. In fact, the study notes, about half of healthcare organizations don’t formally use apps at the point of care. Also, most existing apps offer basic EMR data access, rather than advanced use cases.

The apps offering EMR data access are typically provided by vendors, and only allow users to view such data (as opposed to documenting care), according to the study report. But providers want to roll out apps which allow inputting of clinical data, as this function would streamline clinicians’ ability to make an initial patient assessment, the report notes.

But there are other important app categories which have gained an audience, including diagnostic apps used to support patient assessment, medical reference apps and patient engagement apps.  Other popular app types include clinical decision support tools, documentation tools and secure messaging apps, according to researchers.

It’s worth noting, though, that there seems to be a gap between what providers are willing to use and what they are willing to buy or develop on their own. For example, the report notes that nearly all respondents would be willing to buy or build a patient engagement app, as well as clinical decision support tools and documentation apps. The patient engagement apps researchers had in would manage chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, both very important population health challenges.

Hospital leaders, meanwhile, expressed interest in using sophisticated patient portal apps which go beyond simply allowing patients to view their data. “What I would like a patient app to do for us is to keep patients informed all throughout their two- to four-hours ED stay,” one CMO told researchers. “For instance, the app could inform them that their CBC has come back okay and that their physician is waiting on the read. That way patients would stay updated.”

When it came to selecting apps, respondents placed a top priority on usability, followed by the app’s cost, clinical impact, capacity for integration, functionality, app credibility, peer recommendations and security. (This is interesting, given many providers seem to give usability short shrift when evaluating other health IT platforms, most notably EMRs.)

To determine whether an app will work, respondents placed the most faith in conducting a pilot or other trial. Other popular approaches included vendor demos and peer recommendations. Few favored vendor websites or videos as a means of learning about apps, and even fewer placed working with app endorsement organizations or discovering them at conferences.

But providers still have a few persistent worries about third-party apps, including privacy and security, app credibility, the level of ongoing maintenance needed, the extent of integration and data aggregation required to support apps and issues regarding data ownership. Given that worrisome privacy and security concerns are probably justified, it seems likely that they’ll be a significant drag on app adoption going forward.

Digital Transformation in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on March 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/10 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Hosted by Murray Izenwasser (@MurrayIz and @AAJTech). We’ll be discussing the topic “Digital Transformation in Healthcare“.

It’s been said that no industry is immune from disruption due to digital technologies. Some ‘experts’ claim that If existing firms don’t undergo an immediate, all-encompassing and rapid digital transformation (Dx), then they’ll be disrupted out of business by those that do transform their products and services; or displaced by new market entrants that built their businesses on a digital foundation. In short, existing businesses that don’t evolve digitally will perish.

But digital transformation can mean different things to different industries; and to the people operating in and impacted by those industries.

The theme of this week’s #HITsm tweetchat is Digital Transformation in Healthcare and we’ll explore what digital transformation means in general and what it means to healthcare in particular. We’ll share important considerations to increase the likelihood of a successful digital transformation, and we’ll exchange information, ideas and opinions intended to enlighten and enhance your understanding of the opportunity digital transformation offers those operating within the healthcare industry.

Be sure to join the #HITsm chat this Friday, March 10th, 2017 at 12:00pm ET.

The Topics
T1: Everyone is talking about Digital Transformation (Dx) – but what exactly do you think Dx really is? #HITsm

T2: What do you think is most important for a successful DX project – technology, people or other ‘non-digital elements?’ And why? #HITsm

T3: What are most important components of a successful Dx effort & why? Interoperability, IoT, Analytics, Mobile, Cloud? Others? #HITsm

T4: What are the roadblocks and challenges associated with digital transformation and are any unique to healthcare? #HITsm

T5: Patient engagement & ‘empowerment’ are popular themes. How would you like to be empowered by digital transformation in healthcare? #HITsm

Bonus: What are some examples of healthcare companies that you feel have digitally transformed themselves? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/17 – How Do We Include Every Generation in our Health IT?
Hosted by Erica Johansen (@thegr8chalupa and @SplashMedia)

3/24 – TBD
Hosted by @MelissaxxMcCool

3/31 – AI and Cognitive Science
Hosted by @HBI_Solutions

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you have ideas for how to make #HITsm better.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Is It Groundhog Day with Population Health? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on February 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/3 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Hosted by David Chou (@dchou1107) and Lisa Esch (@lisaesch). We’ll be discussing the topic “Is It Groundhog Day with Population Health?“.

Population health seems to be a hot topic in every healthcare IT circle. One of the challenges with population health is that everyone is applying the term to everything. It’s hard to know exactly what is happening with population health and what’s all talk. Plus, in many cases it feels like we’ve been down this road before.

With this in mind, join as at this week’s #HITsm Twitter chat to try and cut through the hyperbole and talk about the population health that’s really making a difference. Plus, we’ll look at how to make sure financial incentives are aligned and where population health is going in the future.

The Topics
Here are the topics to help flesh out the theme of ‘Is It Groundhog Day with Population Health?’

T1: What did you see last week at #himss17 that excited you about population health? #HITsm

T2: Why has this taken so long? We have been talking about value based care since 2011, has any progress been made? #HITsm

T3: Are the financial incentives aligned to moved towards a population health approach? #HITsm

T4: Who are the disruptors that you see so far? #HITsm

T5: What’s next and how do you see this play out? #HITsm

Bonus: Do you think population health impacts your personal health? How? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/10 – Digital Transformation in Healthcare
Hosted by Murray Izenwasser (@MurrayIz and @AAJTech)

3/17 – TBD

3/24 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you have ideas for how to make #HITsm better.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

E-Patient Update:  You Need Our Help

Posted on January 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I just read the results of a survey by Black Book Research suggesting that many typical consumers don’t trust, like or understand health IT.

The survey, which reached out to 12,090 adult consumers in September 2016, found that 57% of those interacting with health IT at hospitals or medical practices were skeptical of its benefit. Worse, 87% said they weren’t willing to share all of their information.

Up to 70% of consumers reported that they distrusted patient portals, medical apps and EMRs. Meanwhile, while many respondents said they were interested in using health trackers, 94% said that their physicians weren’t willing or able to synch wearables data with their EMR.

On the surface, these stats are discouraging. At a minimum, they suggest that getting patients and doctors on the same page about health IT continues to be an uphill battle. But there’s a powerful tactic providers can use which – to my knowledge – hasn’t been tried with consumers.

Introducing the consumer health IT champion

As you probably know, many providers have recruited physician or nurse “champions” to help their peers understand and adjust to EMRs. I’m sure this tactic hasn’t worked perfectly for everyone who’s tried it, but it seems to have an impact. And why not? Most people are far more comfortable learning something new from someone who understands their work and shares their concerns.

The thing is, few if any providers are taking the same approach in rolling out consumer health IT. But they certainly could. I’d bet that there’s at least a few patients in every population who like, use and understand consumer health technologies, as well as having at least a sense of why providers are adopting back-end technology like EMRs. And we know how to get Great-Aunt Mildred to consider wearing a FitBit or entering data into a portal.

So why not make us your health IT champions? After all, if you asked me to, say, hold a patient workshop explaining how I use these tools in my life, and why they matter, I’d jump at the chance. E-patients like myself are by our nature evangelists, and we’re happy to share our excitement if you give us a chance. Maybe you’d need to offer some HIT power users a stipend or a gift card, but I doubt it would take much to get one of us to share our interests.

It’s worth the effort

Of course, most people who read this will probably flinch a bit, as taking this on might seem like a big hassle. But consider the following:

  • Finding such people shouldn’t be too tough. For example, I talk about wearables, mobile health options and connected health often with my PCP, and my enthusiasm for them is a little hard to miss. I doubt I’m alone in this respect.
  • All it would take to get started is to get a few of us on board. Yes, providers may have to market such events to patients, offer them coffee and snacks when they attend, and perhaps spend time evaluating the results on the back end. But we’re not talking major investments here.
  • You can’t afford to have patients fear or reject IT categorically. As value-based care becomes the standard, you’ll need their cooperation to meet your goals, and that will almost certainly include access to patient-generated data from mobile apps and wearables. People like me can address their fears and demonstrate the benefits of these technologies without making them defensive.

I hope hospitals and medical practices take advantage of people like me soon. We’re waiting in the wings, and we truly want to see the public support health IT. Let’s work together!

IBM Watson Partners With FDA On Blockchain-Driven Health Sharing

Posted on January 16, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

IBM Watson Health has partnered with the FDA in an effort to create scalable exchange of health data using blockchain technology. The two will research the exchange of owner-mediated data from a variety of clinical data sources, including EMRs, clinical trial data and genomic health data. The researchers will also incorporate data from mobiles, wearables and the Internet of Things.

The initial project planned for IBM Watson and the FDA will focus on oncology-related data. This makes sense, given that cancer treatment involves complex communication between multispecialty care teams, transitions between treatment phases, and potentially, the need to access research and genomic data for personalized drug therapy. In other words, managing the communication of oncology data is a task fit for Watson’s big brain, which can read 200 million pages of text in 3 seconds.

Under the partnership, IBM and the FDA plan to explore how the blockchain framework can benefit public health by supporting information exchange use cases across varied data types, including both clinical trials and real-world data. They also plan to look at new ways to leverage the massive volumes of diverse data generated by biomedical and healthcare organizations. IBM and the FDA have signed a two-year agreement, but they expect to share initial findings this year.

The partnership comes as IBM works to expand its commercial blockchain efforts, including initiatives not only in healthcare, but also in financial services, supply chains, IoT, risk management and digital rights management. Big Blue argues that blockchain networks will spur “dramatic change” for all of these industries, but clearly has a special interest in healthcare.  According to IBM, Watson Health’s technology can access the 80% of unstructured health data invisible to most systems, which is clearly a revolution in the making if the tech giant can follow through on its potential.

According to Scott Lundstrom, group vice president and general manager of IDC Government and Health Insights, blockchain may solve some of the healthcare industry’s biggest data management challenges, including a distributed, immutable patient record which can be secured and shared, s. In fact, this idea – building a distributed, blockchain-based EMR — seems to be gaining traction among most health IT thinkers.

As readers may know, I’m neither an engineer nor a software developer, so I’m not qualified to judge how mature blockchain technologies are today, but I have to say I’m a bit concerned about the rush to adopt it nonetheless.  Even companies with a lot at stake  — like this one, which sells a cloud platform backed by blockchain tech — suggest that the race to adopt it may be a bit premature.

I’ve been watching tech fashions come and go for 25 years, and they follow a predictable pattern. Or rather, they usually follow two paths. Go down one, and the players who are hot for a technology put so much time and money into it that they force-bake it into success. (Think, for example, the ERP revolution.) Go down the other road, however, and the new technology crumbles in a haze of bad results and lost investments. Let’s hope we go down the former, for everyone’s sake.

Patient Engagement Platforms Are 2017’s Sexiest Tech

Posted on January 3, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the last few months, I’ve become convinced that the predictable star of 2017 — population health management — isn’t going to be as hot as people think.

Instead, I’d argue that the trend to watch is the emergence of new technologies that guide, reach out to and engage with patients at key moments in their care process. We’re at the start of a period of spectacular growth for patient engagement platforms, with one analyst firm predicting that the global market for these solutions will hit $34.94 billion by 2023.

We all seem to agree already that we need to foster patient engagement if we want to meet population health goals. But until recently, most of the approaches I’ve seen put in place are manual, laborious and resource-intensive. Yes, the patient portal is an exception to that rule – and seems to help patients and clinicians connect – but there’s only so much you can do with a portal interface. We need more powerful, flexible solutions if we hope to make a dent in the patient engagement problem.

In the coming year, I think we’ll see a growing number of providers adopt technology that helps them interact and engage with patients more effectively. I’m talking about initiatives like the rollout of technology by vendor HealthGrid at ColumbiaDoctors, a large multispecialty group affiliated with Columbia University Medical Center, which was announced last month.

While I haven’t used the technology first hand, it seems to offer the right functions, all available via mobile phone. These include pre- and post-visit communications, access to care information and a clinically-based rules engine which drives outreach regarding appointments, educations, medications and screening. That being said, HealthGrid definitely has some powerful competitors coming at the same problem, including the Salesforce.com Health Cloud.

Truth be told, it was probably inevitable that vendors would turn up to automate key patient outreach efforts. After all, unless providers boost their ability to target patients’ individual needs – ideally, without hiring lots of costly human care managers – they aren’t likely to do well under value-based payment schemes. One-off experiments with mobile apps or one-by-one interventions by nurse care coordinators simply don’t scale.

Of course, these technologies are probably pretty expensive right now – as new tech in an emerging market usually is — which will probably slow adoption somewhat. I admit that when I did a Google search on “patient engagement solutions,” I ran into a vendor touting a $399 a month option for doctors, which isn’t too bad if it can actually deliver. But enterprise solutions are likely to be a big investment, and also, call for a good deal of integration work. After all, if nothing else, health systems will want to connect patient engagement software to their back-office systems and EMR, at minimum, which is no joke.

Still, to my mind there’s little question that patient engagement technologies are going to be the sexiest health IT niche to watch in 2017, one which will generate major buzz in healthcare boardrooms across the country. Whether you invest or not, definitely watch this space.

Connected Wearables Pose Growing Privacy, Security Risks

Posted on December 26, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In the past, the healthcare industry treated wearables as irrelevant, distracting or worse. But over that last year or two, things have changed, with most health IT leaders concluding that wearables data has a place in their data strategies, at least in the aggregate.

The problem is, we’re making the transition to wearable data collection so quickly that some important privacy and security issues aren’t being addressed, according to a new report by American University and the Center for Digital Democracy. The report, Health Wearable Devices in the Big Data Era: Ensuring Privacy, Security, and Consumer Protection, concludes that the “weak and fragmented” patchwork of state and federal health privacy regulations doesn’t really address the problems created by wearables.

The researchers note that as smart watches, wearable health trackers, sensor-laden clothing and other monitoring technology get connected and sucked into the health data pool, the data is going places the users might not have expected. And they see this as a bit sinister. From the accompanying press release:

Many of these devices are already being integrated into a growing Big Data digital health and marketing ecosystem, which is focused on gathering and monetizing personal and health data in order to influence consumer behavior.”

According to the authors, it’s high time to develop a comprehensive approach to health privacy and consumer protection, given the increasing importance of Big Data and the Internet of Things. If safeguards aren’t put in place, patients could face serious privacy and security risks, including “discrimination and other harms,” according to American University professor Kathryn Montgomery.

If regulators don’t act quickly, they could miss a critical window of opportunity, she suggested. “The connected health system is still in an early, fluid stage of development,” Montgomery said in a prepared statement. “There is an urgent need to build meaningful, effective, and enforceable safeguards into its foundation.”

The researchers also offer guidance for policymakers who are ready to take up this challenge. They include creating clear, enforceable standards for both collection and use of information; formal processes for assessing the benefits and risks of data use; and stronger regulation of direct-to-consumer marketing by pharmas.

Now readers, I imagine some of you are feeling that I’m pointing all of this out to the wrong audience. And yes, there’s little doubt that the researchers are most worried about consumer marketing practices that fall far outside of your scope.

That being said, just because providers have different motives than the pharmas when they collect data – largely to better treat health problems or improve health behavior – doesn’t mean that you aren’t going to make mistakes here. If nothing else, the line between leveraging data to help people and using it to get your way is clearer in theory than in practice.

You may think that you’d never do anything unethical or violate anyone’s privacy, and maybe that’s true, but it doesn’t hurt to consider possible harms that can occur from collecting a massive pool of data. Nobody can afford to get complacent about the downside privacy and security risks involved. Plus, don’t think the nefarious and somewhat nefarious healthcare data aggregators aren’t coming after provider stored health data as well.

Columbia-Affiliated Physician Group Plans Rollout Of Mobile Engagement Platform

Posted on December 15, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A massive multispecialty medical practice associated with Columbia University has decided to implement a mobile patient engagement platform, as part of a larger strategy aimed at boosting patient satisfaction and ease of access to care.

The vendor behind the technology, HealthGrid, describes its platform as offering the physicians the ability to “provide actionable care coordination, access to critical health information and to enable [patient] self-care management.” HealthGrid also says that its platform will help the group comply with the requirements of Meaningful Use and MIPS.

The group, ColumbiaDoctors, includes more than 1,700 physicians, surgeons, dentists and nurses, and offers more than 230 specialty and subspecialty areas of care. All of the group’s clinicians are affiliated with New York-Presbyterian hospital and serve as faculty at Columbia University Medical Center.

The group is investing heavily in making its services more accessible and patient-friendly. In April, for example, ColumbiaDoctors agreed to roll out the DocASAP platform, which is designed to offer patients advanced online scheduling capabilities, including features allowing patients to find and book patients via mobile and desktop channels, tools helping patients find the best provider for their needs and analytics tools for business process improvement.

HealthGrid, for its part, describes itself as a CRM platform whose goal is to “meet patients where they are.” The vendor has developed a rules engine, based on clinical protocols, that connects with patients at key points in the care process. This includes reaching out to patients regarding needed appointments, education, medications and screening, both before and after they get care. The system also allows patients to pay their co-pays via mobile channels.

Its other features include automated mobile check-in – with demographic information auto-populated from the EMR – which patients can update from their mobile phones. The platform allows patients to read, update and sign off on forms such as HIPAA documentation and health information using any device.

While I’d never heard of HealthGrid before, it sounds like it has all the right ideas in place for consumer engagement. Clearly it impressed ColumbiaDoctors, which must be spending a fair amount on its latest addition. I’m sure the group’s leaders feel that if it increases patient alignment with treatment goals and improves the condition of the population it serves, they’ll come out ahead.

But the truth is, I don’t think anyone knows yet whether health organizations can meet big population health goals by interacting more with patients or spending more time in dusty back rooms fussing over big data analytics. To be sure, if you have enough money to spend they can both reach out directly to patients and invest heavily in next-generation big data infrastructure. However, my instinct is that very few institutions can focus on both simultaneously.

Without a doubt, sophisticated health IT leaders know that it pays to take smart chances, and ColumbiaDoctors is probably wise to pick its spot rather than play catch-up. Still, it’s a big risk as well. I’ll be most eager to see whether tools like HealthGrid actually impact patients enough to be worth the expense.

Can Interoperability Drive Value-Based Care?

Posted on December 14, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As the drive to interoperability has evolved over the last few decades — and those of you who are HIT veterans know that these concerns go at least that far back — open data sharing has gone from being a “nice to have” to a presumed necessity for providing appropriate care.

And along the way, backers of interoperability efforts have expanded their goals. While the need to support coordinated care has always been a basis for the discussion, today the assumption is that value-based care simply isn’t possible without data interoperability between providers.

I don’t disagree with the premise. However, I believe that many providers, health systems and ACOs have significant work to do before they can truly benefit from interoperability. In fact, we may be putting the cart before the horse in this case.

A fragmented system

At present, our health system is straining to meet the demand for care coordination among the populations it serves. That may be in part because the level of chronic illness in the US is particularly high. According to one Health Affairs study, two out of three Americans will have a chronic condition by the year 2030. Add that to the need to care for patients with episodic care needs and the problem becomes staggering.

While some health organizations, particularly integrated systems like the Cleveland Clinic and staff-model managed care plans like Kaiser Permanente, plan for and execute well on care coordination, most others have too many siloes in place to do the job correctly. Though many health systems have installed enterprise EMRs like Epic and Cerner, and share data effectively while the patient remains down in their system, they may do very little to integrate information from community providers, pharmacies, laboratories or diagnostic imaging centers.

I have no doubt that when needed, individual providers collect records from these community organizations. But collecting records on the fly is no substitute for following patients in a comprehensive way.

New models required

Given this history, I’d argue that many health systems simply aren’t ready to take full advantage of freely shared health data today, much less under value-based care payment models of the future.

Before they can use interoperable data effectively, provider organizations will need to integrate outside data into their workflow. They’ll need to put procedures in place on how care coordination works in their environment. This will include not only deciding who integrates of outside data and how, but also how organizations will respond as a whole.

For example, hospitals and clinics will need to figure out who handles care coordination tasks, how many resources to pour into this effort, how this care coordination effort fits into the larger population health strategy and how to measure whether they are succeeding or failing in their care coordination efforts. None of these are trivial tasks, and the questions they raise won’t be answered overnight.

In other words, even if we achieved full interoperability across our health system tomorrow, providers wouldn’t necessarily be able to leverage it right away. In other words, unfettered health data sharing won’t necessarily help providers win at value-based care, at least not right away. In fact, I’d argue that it’s dangerous to act as though interoperability can magically make this happen. Even if full interoperability is necessary, it’s not sufficient. (And of course, even getting there seems like a quixotic goal to some, including myself.)

Planning ahead

That being said, health organizations probably do have time to get their act together on this front. The move to value-based care is happening quickly, but not at light speed, so they do have time to make plans to leverage interoperable health data.

But unless they acknowledge the weaknesses of their current system, which in many cases is myopic, siloed and rigid, interoperability may do little to advance their long-term goals. They’ll have to admit that their current systems are far too inward-looking, and that the problem will only go away if they take responsibility for fixing it.

Otherwise, even full interoperability may do little to advance value-based care. After all, all the data in the world won’t change anything on its own.

Vendor Study Says Wearables Can Promote Healthy Behavior Change

Posted on November 28, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study backed by a company that makes an enterprise health benefits platform has concluded that wearables can encourage healthy behavior change, and also, serve as an effective tool to engage employees in their health.

The data from the study, which was sponsored by Mountain View, CA-based Jiff, comes from a two-year research project on employer-sponsored wearables. Rajiv Leventhal, who wrote about the study for Healthcare Informatics, argues that these findings challenge common employer beliefs about these type of programs, including that participation is typically limited to young and healthy employees, and that engagement with these rules can’t be sustained over time.

The data, which was drawn from 14 large employers with 240,000 employees, apparently suggests that wearable adoption and long-term engagement is possible for employees of all ages. The company reported that among the employers offered the wearables program via its enterprise health platform, 53% of employees under 40 years old participated, and 36% of employees over 50 years participated as well.

Jiff researchers also found that employee engagement had not measurably fallen for more than nine months following the program rollout, and that for one employer, levels of engagement have been progressively increasing for more than 18 months, the company reported.

According to Jiff, they have helped sustain employee engagement by employing three tactics:  Using “challenges,” time-bound immersive and social games that encourage healthy actions, “device credits,” subsidies that offset the cost of purchasing wearables and “behavioral incentives,” rewards for taking healthy actions such as walking a minimum number of steps per day.

The thing is, as interesting as these numbers might be — and they do, if nothing else, underscore the role of engaging consumers rather than waiting for them to engage with healthier behaviors on their own — the story doesn’t address one absolutely crucial issue, to wit, what concrete health impact are companies seeing from employee use of these devices.

I don’t think I’m asking for too much here when I demand some quantitative data suggesting that the setup can actually achieve measurable health results. Everything I’ve read about employee wellness initiatives to date suggests that they’ve been a giant bust, with few if any accomplishing anything measurable.

And here we have Jiff, a venture-backed hotshot company, which I’m guessing had the resources to report on results if it found any. After all, if I understand the study right, with their researchers had access to 540,000 employees for significant amount of time.  So where are the health conclusions that can be drawn from this population?

And by the way, no, I don’t accept that patient engagement (no matter how genuine) can be used as a proxy or predictive factor for health improvement. It’s a promising step in the right direction but it isn’t the real thing yet.

So, I shared the study with you because I thought you might find it interesting. I did. But I wouldn’t take it too seriously when it comes to signs of real change — either for wearables used for employee wellness initiatives. At this point both are more smoke than substance.