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What’s the Mission of Your Healthcare Organization?

Posted on March 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Saturday I had the tremendous (that’s in the sarcasm font in case you missed it) opportunity to do a pediatric walk in visit for my daughter. Everything is fine and my daughter’s doing well. However, while I was waiting in the lobby, I saw the following sign posted on the wall:
Partners Healthcare Mission Statement

For those who can’t see images, here’s what it says:
Mission: Deliver the highest quality of care to tall of our patients.
Promise: HealthCare Partners of Nevada and its team of professionals will not tolerate nor be indifferent to poor quality.
Creed: Live our mission; Keep our promise

Someone recently described my blog focus as covering the business of healthcare. I thought that was a pretty decent description. Certainly we have an IT bend to almost all of our content, but we’re happy to write about anything that relates to the business of healthcare. It just so happens that IT is involved in almost every business aspect of healthcare.

With this focus, I think I sometimes get a little jaded when it comes to healthcare organizations motivations when it comes to the care they provide their patients. I’ve often argued for the importance of the almighty dollar when it comes to influencing doctors in healthcare. This was reinforced just today in Dr. Jayne’s post on HIStalk where she said, “At least all of our physicians were migrated to a common contract in tandem with our EHR project more than half a decade ago because we realized only money would align them with our goals.

While I still believe that the financial incentives are the best motivator, I think we need to be careful and not take it too far. Healthcare should be and can be more than just the financial incentives alone. In fact, any organization with a long term view will likely have a mission similar to the one espoused by Partners HealthCare.

I strive similarly with my blogs. Certainly I need my blogs to be a viable business and I want to continue building them to be able to reach more people. However, my goal is for my blogs to be about much more than just making a buck. I believe they have, can, and will have an important impact for good on healthcare. I’m sure I’ll overstep on occasion and my good readers will hold me accountable when I do. However, hopefully the Healthcare Scene network can stay focused on providing real value to those who read.

I should maybe consider having my wife do a guest blog post on Partners HealthCare’s above mission as well. She took two of my boys to the same pediatric office today for a scheduled appointment to get some immunizations they said were needed. After waiting an hour in a non-kid friendly exam room with two children, the doctor came in for the visit and noticed my son was acting wild. The doctor then asked if my son was ready for Kindergarten if he couldn’t sit still in the exam room. My wife quickly replied that if he hadn’t kept her waiting in a non-kid friendly exam room for an hour, then our son would have been fine. Not to mention, my son was not looking forward to the shots.

To add insult to injury, the doctor returned to inform my wife that my son didn’t actually need the immunizations. They had finally found the record and he had already had all the required shots. My guess is they couldn’t find the record because they’d had to switch EHR when their EHR vendor sunset their original EHR. This is the same EHR which the doctor had told me two days previously, “He hated even more than the previous one.” That’s almost enough for me to want a PHR for my children. However, it’s not like the school would accept an immunization record from the PHR.

One could argue that my wife’s experience above didn’t compromise the quality of care my children received. That’s true unless you consider the counseling my wife will need for being driven insane while she waited for an appointment she didn’t actually need.

Having worked in clinics, I’m sympathetic to the doctor and practice. We realize things run behind. We realize their are limitations on what child friendly things they can have in exam rooms (although, how about a TV?). We understand that records get lost or that mistakes are made when looking them up. Although, when all those things conspire against my wife, you can understand her frustration.

This discussion reminds me of a topic I’ve been talking a lot about recently. There’s a difference between quality of care and customer service. As patients we have very little understanding of the quality of care we’re being provided. We don’t really know if the quality of care we’re getting is good or not. However, we’re keenly aware of the customer service experience. If you look at any doctor ratings site, it’s all rating customer service. Yet, so many of us equate those ratings with the quality of care.

What’s the moral of the story? We can all do better. That’s the journey we have ahead of us in healthcare. Continue to improve and do the best we can to provide amazing care. This is not a one time battle that you win and move on. It’s an ongoing battle that never ends. That’s what makes it so difficult. It’s also what makes it so important.

Are Patient Portals Really Helping Patients?

Posted on December 4, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

One thing’s for sure about patient portals: They’re a hot commodity.

What’s less clear is how much good they’re doing for health care.

The popularity of patient portals stems from Meaningful Use Stage 2 patient-engagement requirements. The market for the products is expected to approach $900 million by 2017, up from $280 million in 2012, according to a report from Mountain View, Calif.-based research firm Frost & Sullivan.

Patients like at least one aspect of the portals — the ability to access their own medical records. In a recent Accenture study, more than 40 percent of consumers who can’t access their own records online said they’d consider switching doctors in order to get access.

But several recent studies suggest that currently available products have a way to go before they can consistently improve care, reduce costs or perhaps even increase patient engagement.

In a review of 46 studies, researchers found little evidence that portals were helping much of anything. The doctors from Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System and other institutions wrote that it’s “unlikely that patient portals will have substantial effects on utilization or efficiency, at least in the near term.”

Some of the limitations of the products, they wrote, included “disparities in who accesses these portals and instances of suboptimal patient attitudes of their worth.” The portals typically gave patients options such as looking at their test results, refilling prescriptions and communicating with doctors.

Patient portals likely are most beneficial, the authors wrote, when they’re part of a more comprehensive quality-improvement strategy.

Another study also found that patients, in many cases, fail to see the value of a portal — or at least some parts of it. In questions about hypothetical features, consumers showed interest in “back-office” tasks such as seeing their own medical records. But clinical digital communication capabilities, such as online video consultations with doctors, failed to impress.

The bottom line was that patient portals “may act as a complement to health-care service delivery, while substitution for clinical in-person interactions may not be viewed positively.” In other words, most people just don’t seem to be ready to give up face time with their primary-care physician.

When MU2 starts on Jan. 1, physicians will be required to give their patients electronic access to their health records. The requirement went into effect for hospitals in October.

The U.S. health care system is, with government prodding, investing a huge sum in patient portals. The idea sounds empowering for patients. But given the lack of solid evidence for a benefit at this point, it’s concerning to think the money might be better spent on something else. Let’s hope that vendors and providers are soon able to turn portals into something with tangible benefits for quality care.

Will Google Use Health IT To Make You Immortal?

Posted on November 15, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

When Google Health, an attempt at a personal health record, turned out to be an unqualified failure, the consensus was that people just weren’t interested.

But health care is too big, important and data-ridden a field for Google to ignore. And now the company has moved on to a concept sure to be in demand: It wants to help you live forever. Google’s new anti-aging initiative, Calico, will apparently treat mortality as a big-data problem.

But is data the path to eternal life — or even a few more good years? I’d feel a little more comfortable booking a cruise for the year 2199 if Google had accomplished something in health care already.

Google officials, including cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, haven’t said much about what Calico will actually do. But the project seems to take inspiration from 23andMe, a firm that Google helped to start and whose goal is “to make it possible to create a massive genomic database and thereby understand the permutations and mutations that happen to the human genome during the aging process,” according to the Washington Post.

Time explained in a feature article that medicine “is well on its way to becoming an information science.”

“Doctors and researchers are now able to harvest and mine massive quantities of data from patients,” the magazine continued. “And Google is very, very good with large data sets.”

When you put it that way, it sounds kind of reasonable. And if Google invents a medication, an app or a device that brings about a longer lifespan, then I will certainly take it, download it, wear it or whatever is required. But I doubt the human lifespan is quite that reducible.

The rich and powerful have often hoped to use their resources to overcome their mortality. And as Pete Shanks wrote, “immortality and transhumanist ideas generally have long been a source of fascination in Silicon Valley.”

Ray Kurzweil, Google’s engineering director, is a noted futurist who believes we’ll upload our minds to computers and achieve digital immortality by 2045. It’s not clear what role, if any, Kurzweil will have in Calico.

The human lifespan doesn’t seem to have budged in 100,000 years, but that’s not to say it’s impossible. I don’t doubt that humans’ maximum time on Earth could be increased. Maybe. Someday. For the longest time, humans didn’t fly or play Minecraft, either. And it’s been done in other species.

But Shanks was right when he wrote of Calico that “what’s most aggravating is the hubris involved.” A common fallacy among highly successful people is to think that expertise in one area will apply to other fields.

Google is great at search. Its map service is also ubiquitous, and I’ve heard that its driverless car works well. But when it comes to chaotic human data, the company’s algorithms might not work as well. Take free-form language, for example. When I use Google Translate to decipher the Chinese-language Wikipedia entry for “immortality,” I get sentences like this: “If you can maintain Chang Heng unchanged, it is possible to ‘live forever,’ but before the observation Everything in the world is now, whether living or heartless thing, and both are changing all the time.” It’s an app that can be helpful, but it doesn’t give me confidence that Google can overcome the limitations of our mortal coils. It can barely understand what we’re talking about.

And Google’s track record in health care is, of course, not so strong. Google Health, introduced in 2008 as a way for consumers to collect their health records online, was defunct by the end of 2011. Few consumers found it worth the effort of entering their data, given Google Health’s lack of capabilities such as appointment scheduling, InformationWeek reported.

Let’s hope that whatever Calico comes up with proves more useful. If it can be packaged as a free download, even better.

But I’d rather see Google invest its considerable resources in something with a higher chance of a payoff.

What Value Does a Healthy Patient Get from a PHR?

Posted on November 11, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my previous post about a Patient Controlled Medical Record, I asserted that such a thing would be a challenge to get to work in the US, but that there was a lot of potential internationally. I did provide one caveat when it came to chronic patients where I think there is potential in the US as well. Although, some argued against even that group being interested in the comments.

Let me further expound on why I think the patient controlled medical record fails for a healthy patient (and this includes people who think they’re healthy, or at least relatively healthy…ie. they don’t go to a doctor for any chronic condition). In many respects this is my talking from my own personal perspective as a young, healthy adult (although I guess all of those descriptors could be argued).

The problem for someone that’s healthy is that their medical record basically has no data. The reason you want a patient controlled medical record is so that you can extract value from the data. I don’t need to look at my online medical record to see that I don’t have any drug allergies, that I had a cold or flu 3 years ago, that I got my flu shot 4 years ago, and that when I was 15 I had a hernia operation.

The point being that my medical record is so short that there’s so little value in me trying to aggregate that record in once place. What value do I get from doing so?

I think there could be value in doing so, but not today. For example, if by keeping a patient controlled medical record I could avoid filling out the crazy stack of paperwork that’s given you at every new doctor you visit, I and every other patient would want to keep an online patient record. This should be a solvable problem, but I won’t go into the hundreds of systemic reasons why it’s not going to happen anytime soon. Although, we’ll start with the doctor preferring your allergies to be in the upper right corner in red. Now scale that request up to 700,000 doctors.

Similar to the above item, there are other ancillary functions (ie. appointment scheduling, prescription refills, message your doctor, etc.) that could be tied to your medical record that would make people want to use a PHR or other similar system. However, most people would use it for the ancillary functions and not to be able to control their medical record in one place. For many of the ancillary services this portal will need to be tethered to a PHR.

One trend that I hope will change my description above is the wave of new health sensors that are hitting the market. As those health sensors get better I believe we’ll see a new type of portal that is attractive for even a “healthy” person to visit. This concept coincides with what I call Treating a Healthy Patient. All of this new sensor data could make it worth my time as someone who thinks I’m healthy to check and aggregate my data in one location. The volume of data available would be much more than what I have stored in my memory and so it will make sense for me to visit somewhere that stores and processes my whole medical record.

How these portals full of health sensor data will work with doctors is a topic for another blog post. Until then, I’ll be surprised how many healthy patients really get on board collecting their patient data in a patient controlled medical record.

Mobile PHRs On The Way — Slowly

Posted on October 24, 2013 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

On-demand mobile PHRs are likely to emerge over time, but not until the healthcare industry does something to mend its interoperability problems, according to a new report from research firm Frost & Sullivan.

As the paper notes, mobile application development is moving at a brisk clip, driven by consumer and governmental demands for better quality care, lower healthcare costs and improved access to information.

The problem is, it’s hard to create mobile products — especially a mobile PHR — when the various sectors of the healthcare industry don’t share data effectively.  According to Frost  & Sullivan, it will be necessary to connect up providers, hospitals, physician specialty groups, imaging centers, laboratories, payers and government entities, each of which have operated within their own informational silos and deployed their own unique infrastructures.

The healthcare industry will also need to resolve still-undecided questions as to who owns patient information, Frost & Sullivan suggests.  As things stand, “the patient does not own his or her health information, as this data is stored within the IT  protocols of the EHR system,  proprietary to providers, hospitals and health systems,” said Frost & Sullivan Connected Health Senior Industry Analyst Patrick Riley in a press statement.

While patient ownership of medical data sounds like a problem worth addressing, the industry hasn’t shown the will to address it.  To date, efforts to address the issue of who owns digital files has been met with a “tepid” response, the release notes.

However, it’s clear that outside vendors can solve the problem if they see a need. For example, consider the recent deal in which Allscripts agreed to supply clinical data to health plans.  Allscripts plans to funnel data from participating users of its ambulatory EMR to vendor Inovalon, which aggregates claims, lab, pharmacy, durable medical equipment, functional status and patient demographics for payers. Providers are getting patient-level analyses of the data in return for their participation.

Deals like this one suggest that rather than wait for interoperability, bringing together the data for a robust mobile PHR should be done by a third  party. Which party, what it will it cost to work with them and how the data collection would work are the least of the big problems that would have to be solved — but might be that or nothing for the foreseeable future.

Parents Using PHRs More Likely To Get In All Well-Child Visits

Posted on October 18, 2013 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Parents using an integrated PHR were more likely to take their young children to all recommended well-child visits, according to a Kaiser Permanente study reported in iHealthBeat.

More than 4.3 million members are registered to use Kaiser’s PHR, My Health Manager, on kp.org. During the first half of this year, patients have viewed 17.5 million lab test results, sent 7.4 million secure e-mails to their care providers, refilled 7.1 million prescriptions and scheduled 1.8 million appointments, reports News-Medical.

The study, which was published in The Journal of Pediatrics, analyzed data on more than 7,000 children ages zero to two living in the Northwest U.S. and Hawaii.  The children were enrolled in KP health plans between January 2007 and July 2011.  To determine the appropriate number of well-child visits, researchers  used performance measures listed in the 2010 Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set that state that children aged 0 to 15 months should attend at least six well-care visits, News-Medical says.

The study found that in the Northwest region, children whose parents used the Kaiser PHR during the study period were 2.5 times more likely to bring their child to the recommended number of well-child visits. These children were also 1.2 times more likely to get all of their immunizations.

In Hawaii, meanwhile, children in this group were two times more likely to get all well-child visits, but results related to immunizations were statistically insignficant, iHealthBeat notes.

While it may be too soon to call it a trend, this is one of a growing number of projects which use the PHR concept to help patients engage and take responsibility for their health behaviors.

For example, this summer Howard University Hospital rolled out a mobile PHR for pre-diabetic young adults designed to help them take control of their health.  Howard has given the young adults in the program — aged 18 to 24 and diagnosed with pre-diabetes — access to a mobile version of the NoMoreClipboard PHR for their smartphones.

The program sends a variety of text messages to the young adults targeted by this intervention, which include reminders to interact with the PHR. The program participants are also given a FitBit Zip wireless activity tracker which keeps track of steps taken, distance covered and calories burned per user.

Projects like these, which help patients make the PHR the fulcrum point for better health, are a smart way of using the technology. I expect to see a great deal more of this “PHR=patient engagement=better health” model going forward.

Patients Eager To Access Medical Images Online

Posted on July 19, 2013 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study suggests that making medical images accessible online to patients might be a fruitful method for getting patient engagement up in time for Meaningful Use Stage 2, reports EHR Intelligence.

The study, by IDR Medical and Carestream Health, surveyed 1,000 patients who had recently had an imaging study done, in an effort to examine patient views of patient portal use prior to engagement requirements falling into place with MU Stage 2.

It found that patients were very interested in accessing medical images — as well as the clinical notes accompanying the images — with 68 percent saying it was “extremely likely” they would do so if given the opportunity, according to EHR Intelligence.

Survey respondents were particularly interested in using a portal to access their children’s medical images, with 90 percent saying that they would do so if they could. Meanwhile, 82 percent of people wanted to view their own images.

The researchers assumed that older patients would be less likely to use an online portal, but that other patients who frequently get images taken or already access health data online would probably access a portal often.

While elderly patients aged 71 and above were indeed less likely to be interested in portal use, patients aged 50 to 70 had the most positive attitude toward patient portals.

Not surprisingly, patients who already had access to a patient portal were also very positive about access imaging studies online, the site notes. When given a choice of methods by which they could review imaging studies, 79 percent of patients said that an online portal would be their first choice, either by itself or in addition to hard copies of images and reports.

While some providers have worried that they’ll have trouble getting patients to interact with online patient portals, it seems clear that putting images and interpretative notes online can help, if this data is any indication.

Now, some clinicians have worried that at the extreme — an overly-engaged patient who raises time-consuming questions over trivial details — online patient portals will turn out to be a headache.

But to date, as my colleague Jennifer Dennard notes, the portal-fueled pesty patient isn’t materializing. Perhaps both the portal and the patients have matured to the point where they can support each other.

Cerner Supports Blue Button +

Posted on July 5, 2013 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Cerner has announced plans to support and participate in the Blue Button + initiative, marking a small step towards freer sharing of patient health information by its clients.

Blue Button +, launched as the Automate Blue Button Plus Initiative, is the next generation version of the Blue Button technology for consumer download of health information. This next gen Blue Button is intended to provide a blueprint for better-structured and secure transmission of personal health data.

What this announcement means in practical terms, according to an entry in Cerner’s blog, is that the EMR giant will make it possible for its Cerner Direct clients to securely zap information to any personal health record participating in Blue Button +.  Cerner Direct users will also be able to send automated reminders to people managing specific health conditions or who need age/gender-specific check-ups, plus send out summaries of care and instructions following a health visit.

Cerner Direct, as readers probably guessed, uses standards drawn from the Direct Project, a set of standards and documentation allowing providers to push data from one point to another. Cerner has obtained accreditation from the Direct Trusted Agent Accreditation Program offered by DirectTrust and the Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission.

And why is Cerner taking this step? “The primary goal we have for our clients is to help create a trusted, reliable group of participants with which to securely exchange health care information using Direct protocols over the open internet, helping them reduce their liabilities by creating an efficient, secure method of communication based on best practices,” writes Andy Heeren of Cerner.

This sounds like a reasonable move toward greater data interoperability, if not an earthshaking one. It will be interesting to see where Cerner takes this.

HIEs and Patient Engagement – Why and Why Now?

Posted on June 20, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest post by Jeff Donnell, President of NoMoreClipboard.
Jeff Donnell - NoMoreClipboard PHR
Health information exchanges have become quite adept at moving medical data from provider to provider on behalf of patients, but making that data available to those same patients has rarely been attempted – until recently.

Not including patients at the HIE exchange table is understandable, but ironic. Understandable for reasons ranging from policy challenges to a lack of standards to technical limitations. Ironic because HIEs are ideally positioned to aggregate data from multiple providers – leveraging the interfaces already in place with provider applications – and deliver that data to consumers, overcoming several of the major barriers to patient adoption and use of tools like PHRs and patient portals.

HIEs have recently grown interested in supporting electronic patient engagement, in large part based on provider inquiries regarding meaningful use stage two requirements. Many providers are looking for affordable alternatives to the tethered patient portals being offered by their EHR vendors, and they want to provide their patients with a solution that can be used across the care continuum. Increasingly, providers recognize that a patient who visits five different clinicians is not about to create five different patient portal accounts. Savvy providers realize that the HIE is well equipped to provide portable, interoperable solutions.

For HIEs interested in long-term sustainability, patient engagement makes perfect sense. The HIE can leverage its existing interfaces and aggregated data – making existing medical information available to patients from a single pipe, in a standardized format. The HIE can act as a conduit between consumers and clinicians – adding value for all parties. Providers can transmit data to patients, and recent CMS guidance indicates that all providers who contribute data to a shared portal (like that provided by an HIE) can count patients who use that portal toward their 5% patient participation requirement. Patients avoid having to collect data from every provider they see, and can populate a PHR or HIE portal account with existing electronic data. Everybody wins.

The value is evident, but what about those challenges? In the state of Indiana, we received an ONC Challenge Grant to figure out how to get HIE data in the hands of consumers with a PHR. We are fortunate to reside in a state with five well-established HIEs and a provider community eager to innovate, and we have spent the last two years working on those challenges (giving us a real appreciation for why the ONC affixed the challenge label to this grant program). We have addressed issues ranging from patient ID/Auth/Match to minor consent to provider skepticism to amended data use agreements. We have overcome any number of obstacles to get data flowing, and we are seeing increased levels of engagement and enhanced clinical outcomes.

We have learned any number of lessons to help other HIEs, state agencies and healthcare providers avoid pitfalls and make accelerated progress. We are eager to share what we have learned. Perhaps the most important lesson is to get started now – as crafting and implementing a patient engagement strategy takes time. As nobody appears to be manufacturing more time these days, HIEs and other organizations that envision sharing data with patients even a year or two down the road would be well advised to begin working in earnest, with an eye on making incremental progress.

Jeff Donnell is president of NoMoreClipboard, a web-based, Personal Health Record (PHR) management system designed to consolidate medical information in one convenient and secure location for easy retrieval and updates. NMC enables consumers to share personal or family member medical information with medical professionals electronically, reducing the need for repetitive medical paperwork.  Jeff and the company are committed to developing PHR applications that are consumer-friendly, interactive, secure, mobile and interoperable.  For more information, follow us on Twitter @NoMoreClipboard or visit www.NoMoreClipboard.com.

Benefits and Struggles of EMRs, and More – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on June 9, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Are tablets going to take the place of traditional laptops and desktops? Well, Dr. Michael West seems to think so. He talks about his new-found love for his iPad mini, and how it fulfills all his current needs. Have you traded your desktop in for a tablet yet? The new Microsoft Surface is making me kind of want to!

Having a PHR on your phone doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, if your phone has a camera (what phone doesn’t nowadays?) you can create when quickly and easily. Here are five health-related snapshots you could keep on your phone to assist in a variety of situations.

If you have been following the Affordable Health Care Act, you’ll know that an optional Medicaid State Plan called Medicaid Health Homes was introduced. There are, of course, many questions that people have about this, including what kind of technology will be required for successful implementation. Lori Bernstein, president of GSI Health, addresses some questions and lays out the benefits that this new model has to offer in her guest post at EMR and EHR last week. what kind of technology will Medicaid Health Homes require to ensure successful implementation?

Paper to EMR is a necessary evil for for hospitals, therefore, it’s easy to justify the expense required to do so. But what about when you decide to switch EMRs. Is it justifiable? Not always. There is no ROI to switch from EMR and EMR, and it can be a big risk.

A current pilot program is currently underway to help identify high-risk pregnancies by using an EMR. This pilot program is being led by researchers and people from Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Population Health IT to find hints in a mother’s health history to help determine if her pregnancy is high-risk. It’s a slow-moving project, but may prove to be worth it if it helps get mothers the help they nee.d